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A serious question I cannot resolve.

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posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 12:51 AM
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I have a great grandmother very Sicilian came over on the boats to America. Though regretfully I hardly see her, she writes me every holiday and when doing so she Always refers to me as master. Master Jarod this and master jarod that. It is somewhat. Strange and I can't find anything online about this reference can some please explain with historical context?




posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 12:56 AM
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a reply to: TechniXcality

en.m.wikipedia.org...


It's a sign of respect.

Now go and spend some quality time with nonna.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 12:57 AM
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She's stuck in a bygone age where the men of the house were Master, and women of the house were Mistress. When referring to you as a child, she might call you 'young Master Jarod..."

Or she likes fantasy novels and prefers flowery speech over more common.

edit on 000000003112amb14America/Chicago by Hushabye because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 12:59 AM
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As thesaneone said it's a sign of respect.

I think the best example would be Alfred from Batman. "Master Bruce." Though I've never heard it in person, it seems to have fallen out of favor with the latest generation. Sir, madam, Mr.____, Mrs._____ has been replaced with "thanks man" and the like.

Though I prefer thanks man over some of the other things us young people say....



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: TechniXcality
Not sure about a specific Italian-centric meaning, but I've seen it in multiple places and it's generally a proper but gentile and affectionate way to address a young man. An encouraging acknowledgement that he is growing into a man. a sign of respect. That's my guess.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 01:05 AM
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My grandparents used to do this when writing also and they are not Italian.

I believe what others have said is correct: sign of respect and care.
edit on 8-10-2014 by Pinke because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 01:14 AM
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a reply to: Pinke

I would agree accept she never refers to the females In my family in such respect. Also my mother very Irish hates to be around her because she only agrees an supports the man's (in this case my father's ) we'll being and beliefs. Ironicly, she married and Irishman named James McCusker which dishonored both familys. He died many years earlier.
edit on 8-10-2014 by TechniXcality because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: TechniXcality

Master is still used here in NZ quite a bit. It is a tittle like Mr and is used for a young male not yet a adult.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 01:55 AM
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As above posters have already mentioned, a sign of respect to a younger male.

Also still used between consenting adults in certain "ahem" situations as well as the titles Sir, Madam, mistress etc etc...

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 02:56 AM
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originally posted by: TechniXcality
a reply to: Pinke
I would agree accept she never refers to the females In my family in such respect. Also my mother very Irish hates to be around her because she only agrees an supports the man's (in this case my father's )

Hate to say it but ... patriarchy? haha

I don't hold these types of things against my older relatives. Just different times.

I think it's an antiquated term in many societies.
edit on 8-10-2014 by Pinke because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 03:15 AM
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Like others have said, it's an antiquated term for the younger males of a family.

I used to get called Miss *my name*, and my brother Master.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 03:31 AM
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a reply to: TechniXcality

I believe the practice of referring to young (less than sixteen years of age) male correspondents as Master this that or the other, is rooted in Old English, and therefore has echoes in all realms which were heavily influenced by the language, and indeed the English expansion into other realms of Earth. It is probable that your grandmothers grasp of the English language was at least in part sourced from some very old works of English literature, where it appears most commonly.

However, her use of it when addressing you as an adult male is somewhat technically inappropriate, although it is not at all unheard of for a parent or grandparent to continue to refer to their younger male relatives in this fashion as a term of endearment. It is possible that use of this phrase reveals that while your grandmother is no doubt aware that you are a face wrecking badass these days, she will always associate her mental picture of your good self, with that of the child you were when last you had a regular association with her.
edit on 8-10-2014 by TrueBrit because: Added detail for clarification .



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: TechniXcality
When I was a child, letters addressed to young boys were always addressed as "Master John Smith", until they were old enough to be addressed as "Mr. John Smith".
She may have picked up the idea that this remains normal English usage.
So perhaps it's a sign that she doesn't realise you have grown up.


edit on 8-10-2014 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: TechniXcality

"Master" is "mister" for young men.

ETA: i don't really see it as antiquated. I use it frequently
edit on 10/8/2014 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:03 AM
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I had some older female relatives (born around the turn of the 20th century) who would also use this term when writing to my brother when he was a child. They were from the Mid-West.

Sal

a reply to: TechniXcality



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: The GUT




it's generally a proper but gentile and affectionate way to address a young man.


Exactly,


A boy before turning 18 and becoming a man in legal terms is referenced to as master.

All Doctors records and other documents of authorities had me titled as master so and so until I became 18 and then it was Mr. so and so.



posted on Oct, 9 2014 @ 07:27 PM
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You are the master of your universe. Master of your destiny. Captain of your fate.



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