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Government Set Up A Fake Facebook Page In This Woman’s Name

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posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 07:41 AM
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(Mods if in wrong place, etc etc)



The Justice Department is claiming, in a little-noticed court filing, that a federal agent had the right to impersonate a young woman online by creating a Facebook page in her name without her knowledge. Government lawyers also are defending the agent’s right to scour the woman’s seized cellphone and to post photographs — including racy pictures of her and even one of her young son and niece — to the phony social media account, which the agent was using to communicate with suspected criminals.


No permission, doubt any kind of witsec in case of retaliation & oh yeah, they posted pics of her KIDS, all in the name of the "war on drugs."



The account was actually set up by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration special agent Timothy Sinnigen.
Not long before, law enforcement officers had arrested Arquiett, alleging she was part of a drug ring. A judge, weighing evidence that the single mom was a bit player who accepted responsibility, ultimately sentenced Arquiett to probation. But while she was awaiting trial, Sinnigen created the fake Facebook page using Arquiett’s real name, posted photos from her seized cell phone, and communicated with at least one wanted fugitive — all without her knowledge.


We wouldn't even know about this if there wasn't a lawsuit involved.

Court filing

And the page is still up after four years!

Fake facebook page

So cops can shoot ANYONE "in fear of their safety" but even if you have kids, anything can be done (including posting kids pics) in the name of war on drugs & the hell with your & their safety.

Seriously? Why are their lives more important then ours? Where's anonymous when we need them?

Anyone feel like making a facebook page where Timothy Sinnigen.comes out as someone who has problems with making love to farm animals?

I know, defamation of character & the like I'm sure, two sets of rules, blah blah blah.

#sickofthis#

Source
edit on 7-10-2014 by schadenfreude because: forgot source




posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 07:45 AM
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Crafty. I don't think it is right to do this and it should be illegal, but I am still impressed that the guy thought of it.


+4 more 
posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Impressed?
....I'm disgusted. Disgusted at the lengths that the # go to, all in the name of "the war on drugs".

There is nothing "crafty" about this and it didn't take a rocket scientist to come up with the idea.

....I'm also fairly sure it is illegal, though....don't hold me to that. "Legal" and "lawful" are often in stark contrast, especially these days.

..................
Wondering what would happen if I was to set up a fake page and impersonate someone......?


+2 more 
posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 07:53 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I thought identity theft WAS illegal.

Just where's the line anymore? Or does the end always justify the means?



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 07:58 AM
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a reply to: schadenfreude




The government’s response lays out an argument justifying Sinnigen’s actions: “Defendants admit that Plaintiff did not give express permission for the use of photographs contained on her phone on an undercover Facebook page, but state the Plaintiff implicitly consented by granting access to the information stored in her cell phone and by consenting to the use of that information to aid in an ongoing criminal investigations [sic].”


Silent consent.....
They [the government] surely knows how to utilize it to the fullest. A tired old game it is.


And the fact that pictures of her young children were posted....(I'm shutting up before I get pegged with a T&C violation for what I was about to say!)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: schadenfreude

Identity theft isn't illegal in some cases. Narcotics agents often make up names and fake contact information to accomplish what they want. This case is a little unusual though. If it was illegal the cop would have been charged with a crime.

Like I said, I do not think this kind of stuff should be going on, it should be illegal. The cops can make up their own identities.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: Jakal26

I think ppl need to say what's not pc, just so other ppl can get used to the idea.

I'm sure the founding fathers thought the same way.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Crafty. I don't think it is right to do this and it should be illegal, but I am still impressed that the guy thought of it.
It would be crafty if someone did this to find someone to save their life. If they had permission and the objective was to find a missing child or something. It would be crafty if it were Joe Blow from Idaho who did it to find someone, a long lost cousin, or a person than owed them money or whatever.

But not when the state does it. Its not crafty its a dystopian reality.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Hey if the DEA wants to make up an identity like Joe Shmoe from Buffalo, I got no problem with that. None.

But using someone else's identity, without their permission, (or even with their permission I'd wager) is the very definition of identity theft.

The fact that the govt. did it, in the name of WOD, shouldn't mean squat.

Again, two sets of rules & everyone else be damned.

ETA: If something happened to her children, would anyone goto jail or get fired? We both know the answer to that. Back in the day even the mob had rules. "No women, no kids". It's messed up when the mob has better values than the Feds.
edit on 7-10-2014 by schadenfreude because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:11 AM
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In a former life I saw this happen all the time. Narcotics officers raid a drug dealers pad and 'set up shop'. When people call up to score they say, "come on over". Anyone who shows up is arrested.

Old tactic. It puts doubt in the hearts of everyone involved with that place. Of course they continue that practice. It works.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

My ex girlfriend used the same tactics in the 10th grade... and you're impressed?

Where do we draw the line? "No one is above the law" HA
edit on 7-10-2014 by 0bservant because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

I can attest to this.
I have seen dealers be arrested and the cops keep running the "trap".
....the worst part is, I live in a fairly small, rural community where dealers and customers are generally tight-nit....one would think that the buyer would have a few red flags raised when he shows up and some guy he doesn't even know is the one with the stuff and his normal dealer is no where to be seen. Nope....a few convincing words is all it would take and then it was a done deal, arrest made.

That is a bit different than this though. Especially bringing her children into it. I cannot recall any of those trap houses that I personally know of still having children present when the agents were doing their little sting. It would be like leaving them in the yard..."go play now, kiddies....mommy and daddy are taking a ride and will be back shortly......oh, and make sure to invite some of those junkies in for 'treats'....mommy and daddy will be REEEAALLL PROUD of you for helping us".....

......faking the profile and posting her information was bad enough. Bringing the kids to it takes it to a new low.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: Jakal26


faking the profile and posting her information was bad enough. Bringing the kids to it takes it to a new low.

Yah, about new lows. They even take the kids and sell them-- I mean foster them, right? Then they take the cars, the TV and shoot the dog

.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

sneaky #ing bastards!

it's worse enough that they steal her identity and post her existing pictures on a profile shes unaware of because she's awaiting trial. it's even more #ed up that they were posting pictures of the woman's kids.

wonder what their defense argument is going to consist of? "anything goes in the war on drugs?". "all is fair in love and the war on drugs?"

bet the asshole only gets a slap on the wrist with a paid for vacation. oh the humanity....



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

This is war plain and simple. The only way to win this war is to FIGHT for your freedom. Bloodshed will be involved as the case with anywar. If we simply sit down and hope someone will bring the freedoms you want by the system your dilusional. Take back the country and its obvious laws and peacfull routes are exhausted. Its up to the Militia as the military and politics have failed us.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:54 AM
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Thats #ed up, particularly about the kids... law enforcement should not be able to break the law like that. But this part made me lol:



The DEA’s actions might never have come to light if Arquiett, now 28, hadn’t sued Sinnigen, accusing him in federal district court in Syracuse, New York, of violating her privacy and placing her in danger.


Yet getting involved in a drug ring didnt place her in danger? lol



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:55 AM
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My solution to all that was to stop doing dope. I'm to old to fight that demon anymore. Or the frigging cops.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:23 AM
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originally posted by: schadenfreude
a reply to: rickymouse

I thought identity theft WAS illegal.

Just where's the line anymore? Or does the end always justify the means?


Just another example of a system polluted with evil
using a threadbare pretext of 'the common good' to
do what it wants. The common good is a universal
excuse for the system to do evil to the commoners.
You can so everything in-between, and including the
act of quoting me or defaming me-- but I'm powerless
to stop anyone from doing it, because injury is also a
subjective term now dictated by the system.
Nutshell: if you're totally evil you can do anything.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:25 AM
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Facebook and online dating sites have become a bit of a honey pot for the DEA and their investigations. While most have wised up, when Facebook was still growing in popularity there were a bunch of naive people who would share pictures of illegal activity and blog about it. Most realize now that what is on facebook can be used against you, especially in the drug war. I have noticed in the past when ever I would write something controversial via Facebook be it about the drug war or the 2nd Amendment I would almost be instantly friend requested from a very attractive girl that I have never met. Most guys will instantly add this kind of 'request' where someone like me actually likes to know a person before I approve it.

Online dating sites is another hot spot for the DEA. I know of several undercovers who have a Plenty of Fish profile, where they state they like to party and usually have the number 420 written on their profile somewhere to make them seem legit. In my home state of Florida the undercovers will indulge with cannabis with those they are investigating in hopes of finding illegal drugs, grow ops, and large scale distributors.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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That's against the FB terms, or so they claim. We know where some of the huge worth of facebook is derived, US government payouts to them for entrapment use.




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