It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Is Gout hereditary?

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 11:18 PM
link   
Does anyone here suffer from this? Did your father have it?

My dad has been dealing with gout for quite some time now, he's in his late 40's and whenever he has a gout attack his knee swells up really bad.

Now I'm worried that I might suffer from it in the future. From everything I've read so far, it does seem that gout is a hereditary disease.

If anyone here suffers from it, did your father have it as well?




posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 11:32 PM
link   
a reply to: muse7

Does your father take a diuretic: meds that promotes the production of urine? This can cause it to be more frequent.

My mother suffers off and on from Gout in sometimes both feet. I finally got her taking apple cider vinegar which is suppose to help neutralize the uric acid that is the cause of Gout. She hasn't been taking it long enough for me to know how effective it is but so far since she is drinking ACV she hasn't had an occurrence.

I hope it's not hereditary because it doesn't seem pleasant at all. She's not able to walk until the pain subsides. This last sometimes several days.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 11:57 PM
link   
Gout used to he an ailment of the rich. Due to excess. Now its become an ailment of anyone that eats poorly and can't properly process.

As stated above its too much uric acid in the body. There is a special diet for this... gout isn't hereditary eating habits tend to be taught to our children though.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 12:00 AM
link   
My Dad never had Gout, I have never had Gout, my 33 year old son has Gout.


To Theliewelive.

I will tell my son to try ACV thanks.



a reply to: muse7



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 12:55 AM
link   
a reply to: keenasbro

tart cherries, tart cherry juice very good for gout...



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 02:33 AM
link   
a reply to: muse7


Gout has a tendency to run in families .... My mother had it, and since

my first attack the doctor has put me on a daily dose of 'Allopurinol',

which seems to have contained it.

In the last week I have read in the medical section of newspapers that

a drink of sour cherries has been found to have a positive effect on

sufferers. I have yet to try it but I certainly intend to.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 03:31 AM
link   
Gout has a tendency to run in families.
But there is no certain pattern of inheritance and no genetic test for it.
Therefore you'll never know until you actually do get it.
Allopurinol is helpful to prevent subsequent attacks, but should only be taken if you actually do have the condition.
Tip: Allopurinol while experiencing the pain of gout makes it worse, so it is best to let the attack subside before starting it. Not knowing this might lead patients to blame the allopurinol, when it actually is helpful in preventing further attacks.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 05:47 AM
link   
a reply to: muse7

I don't know about gout but diarrhea is... it runs in Your genes.


Look for a cherry/pomegranate juice mix.. drink LOTS more water..



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:09 AM
link   

originally posted by: JimNasium
a reply to: muse7

I don't know about gout but diarrhea is... it runs in Your genes.


Look for a cherry/pomegranate juice mix.. drink LOTS more water..


That can run in your jeans ...



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 10:22 PM
link   
a reply to: muse7
No nothing is hereditary its what you put into your body that determines if you will be ill or not.
if your mum does not get all of the nutrients between the time of conception and 3 months into the pregnancy then you will have a nutritional deficiency and will be ill later on in life if your mum gets all the nutrients it will be very unlikely you are ever ill.

gout is a form of arthritis which would indicate you have a deficiency of boron take borax 60mg a day ( we can take up to 2 teaspoons a day of borax and it has been proven to be safe) and magnesium you need 400-600mg a day and also a deficiency of potassium which removes uric acid, cut out salt if possible as we only need 0.07mg a day and replace with Himalayan salt one teaspoon a day Is optimal due to all the minerals it contains 78 all in, table salt has had 76 minerals removed from it and it takes 23 times the amount of cellular water to remove table salt from your body

find out what foods you get these from, bananas with the skin on (wash thoroughly due to pesticides) is a very good source of potassium and magnesium raw food is extremely beneficial as the nutrients are not denatured by heat

you could also take nascent iodine about 2 drops a day in distilled water and sulphur coarse crystal flakes no additives can be used in making the sulphur as additives stop anything working further than the GI tract

we are all deficient in iodine sulphur and boron these help to balance your chemicals in your body and remove heavy metals which is the cause of most disease
edit on 7-10-2014 by jinni73 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 10:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: alexball
Gout has a tendency to run in families.
But there is no certain pattern of inheritance and no genetic test for it.
Therefore you'll never know until you actually do get it.
Allopurinol is helpful to prevent subsequent attacks, but should only be taken if you actually do have the condition.
Tip: Allopurinol while experiencing the pain of gout makes it worse, so it is best to let the attack subside before starting it. Not knowing this might lead patients to blame the allopurinol, when it actually is helpful in preventing further attacks.


while telling people to use pharmaceutical poisons please tell them the side effects

Allopurinol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to allopurinol: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using allopurinol and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;


the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild;


pain or bleeding when you urinate;


nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, weight loss, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);


urinating less than usual or not at all;


joint pain, flu symptoms;


severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or


easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin.


Less serious allopurinol side effects may include:

vomiting, diarrhea;


drowsiness, headache;


changes in your sense of taste; or


muscle pain.


This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur

I believe the swelling of the throat would in some cases lead to death a side effect not mentioned
edit on 7-10-2014 by jinni73 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 02:38 AM
link   
a reply to: jinni73
It is true. Allopurinol is associated with those side effects.

But gout is painful, and sometimes debilitating.
When neglected it often ulcerates and ruins joint function.
In these conditions, sometimes the poison is better than the disease.

www.cdaarthritis.com...



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:00 PM
link   
Gout is different for different sufferers, and my experience doesn't necessarily apply to other cases.
It's also a stigmatized condition, often associated with excessive eating and drinking alcohol, or old age.
This is not all incorrect, but it is also not correct all of the time, and gout attacks can also be brought on by exercise and dieting.

The common information says that being male puts one at a greater risk, and males also have attacks at a younger age, whereas women largely get it after menopause.
Some say this is changing however, and the ladies are catching up.
Apparently males at risk start depositing the uric acid crystals after the onset of puberty, and the first attack usually occurs about 20 years later.
Males that are prone to gout will typically have their first acute attack in their early to mid thirties.

That's exactly what happened to me when I was about 33.
However, it was the last thing I imagined at the time, and the stereotypes of an obese aristocrat, or a hag with claw-like fingers just didn't fit.
I was exercising at the time (doing a lot of skipping in the backyard), hardly drank soft-drinks and followed a vegetarian diet (although I still ate seafood and drank alcohol).
There was no warning before the first acute attack.
I just woke up one night during winter and it felt like somebody had hit my foot with a sledge-hammer.
Nobody actually knew what it was, and at first I thought it was some kind of insect or snake bite, or that I'd somehow managed to sprain my foot while asleep.

To make a long story short, I was only diagnosed with gout during the second attack bout two weeks later.
I was given colchicine and anti-inflammatories to stop the attack, and a day or so later I started allopurinol and drinking Alka-fizz (one of many cheap powders one can buy over the counter that contains a lot of sodium bicarbonate to make the urine more alkaline).

I was also given a list of high-purine foods to avoid, that went into three classes: never, or very rarely, sometimes and safe.
However, the doctor said that in my case many of those foods weren't applicable (like organ meats), and that I should consult a dietician for more details if necessary.
He also said (a bit off the record) that by his experience red wine consumption preceded the attacks in many (but not all) patients, and if I had to drink wine I should try to stick to dry white wine.
Then it occurred to me that a female ancestor of mine always avoided red wine because she said that it gave her arthritis like pains the next day.
And indeed, I recall drinking red wine (the social plonk for winter) before the attack.
That is, I don't think the red wine a night or so before caused the uric acid build up, but it might have pushed something over the edge for me.
A male ancestor of mine considered himself somewhat of a naturopath, and upon his recommendation I ate a potato-based diet for a few months, with a bake of sliced potatoes, onions and turmeric (the spice supposedly has anti-inflammatory properties).
Although gout was never fully admitted by that side of the family, an ancient packet of Puricos pills I found in the cupboard suggested to me that somebody did have gout a few decades back.

I must commend that doctor for bringing my uric acid levels back to normal, after they were shockingly high during the attack.
Luckily I never had any side-effects from the allopurinol, although they did frighten me, and after a few symptom-free months I stopped.
I'd also heard of guys who had one or two attacks of gout, and it never came back, so I wasn't keen on being lectured by the doctor for not taking my pills for the rest of my life.
A new doctor also suggested that I should only take the pills if another attack occurred, or if my uric acid blood test was too high (I test about twice a year).
Although it has been somewhat high at times, the medication remains untouched in my medicine box.
One shouldn't use the allopurinol during the attack itself, since it can worsen it, but rather to prevent further attacks.

I still get gout-like symptoms in my feet every winter, but over the counter colchicine seems to work when necessary to prevent a full attack.
I used about six tablets over the whole winter.
I also only drink the Alka-fizz when necessary, since it neutralizes the stomach acid, which can lead to other problems over time (another family member of mine got a severe case of a gut parasite after using antacids daily).

So yes, it can be hereditary, although acute attacks can flare up and die down, and people tend to correlate a lot of causes and cures with such attacks.
Another piece of "street wisdom" I picked up is that when the urine is watery and clear the uric acid is OK, but if it goes darker it may be time for an intervention, such as sticking to water, or drinking Alka-fizz twice daily (unless one ate or drank something that dyes the urine, like beetroot).
I've even read somewhere on "Dr. Google" that some races are more prone to gout genetically, such as British people and black Americans (but strangely not black Africans).

I'm not sure there is a genetic test yet, but if one feels one is ancestrally prone perhaps asking for a uric acid test once a year or so couldn't hurt.
I'm also not sure who will develop chronic gout (not just a few acute attacks), but I'd monitor the situation if one has known ancestors with gout, especially as it could lead to secondary problems.
Especially the prospect of a kidney stone is frightening.
I've read of rare chronic gout that doesn't seem to respond to anything, not even the medications, and of people who literally have an acute attack every few hours.
That must be unimaginably painful.

I was at a birthday party not so long ago in the midst of winter, and people remarked that I was drinking white wine in winter (seemingly a major social faux pah).
I then explained that I thought red wine brought out gout attacks for me, and the chance of an attack wasn't worth it.
One lady eyed me suspiciously, as if I was a cripple, or raging alcoholic, and said: "Shame, you've already got gout and you're so young!"
That's the kind of ignorance one deals with, and nobody spoke up, although I knew of at least three other people in that room who'd had acute attacks of gout before!

With the treatments and medication I decided not to take the chronic preventative meds, but to treat the symptoms as they occur with tried and tested, cheap and over the counter medicines.
There are also other options, like Acoxia, which seems to work in a day, but must be prescribed.
So far so good, although everyone is different.
One surgeon I once consulted about an unrelated minor operation however advised that I should see a specialist on rheumatism if another acute attack occurred, and that one shouldn't just rely on general practitioners and over the counter medications, because there could be other underlying causes, or even misdiagnoses.
There's also an awful lot of over-priced snake-oil and diets that claim to cure gout, with no real evidence that they work.

I guess that if I had my life over knowing what I know now, I would have asked for uric acid tests from the moment I turned 30, and perhaps a pattern could have been found to start a course of preventative meds or lifestyle changes, but that's hindsight, and for most people it will come as a sledgehammer in the night.
edit on 8-10-2014 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




top topics



 
2

log in

join