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FBI furious over encrypted phones... or are they?

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posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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www.huffingtonpost.com...


"I am a huge believer in the rule of law, but I also believe that no one in this country is beyond the law," Comey told reporters at FBI headquarters in Washington. "What concerns me about this is companies marketing something expressly to allow people to place themselves beyond the law."





I just finished the NLBS episode where they touched this, and while they missed the veiled message, it hit me so clearly! In what world or battlefield has one side ever came out and directly exposed their own weakness and complained about it??? In a prepared statement no less...

Read through their psychological smokescreen and you can see they are practically endorsing these new phones saying "if you use this, we can't get you" , LOL. They are screaming "wah wah" we can't break into these phones and it's not fair, just to lure people into believing that.

Or does anyone actually believe the FBI are that stupid and really can't break this encryption in about 33seconds ?

Well played FBI, I have nothing to hide anyway, but it will be hilarious to see how many idiots actually fall for this and use their smartphones for illegal activities, haha.




posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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It's part of a reverse psy-ops and controlled opposition.

They still have a back door.

Don't let anybody fool you.

I bet they even have people in the design phases.




posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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It doesn't matter to me one way or another.

It's a telephone.....telephone!

DO NOT PUT CRAP ON THE PHONE THAT WILL GET YOU IN TROUBLE.....PERIOD.

It isn't supposed to be a filing cabinet that holds all your information and deepest darkest secrets. If you keep personal information on your phone then you deserve whatever you get.

People annoy the hell out of me anymore because they have no common sense and it's always someone else's fault when bad things happen.

Don't keep personal info on your phone and it won't get stolen / hacked

Don't store naked photos on your phone or on an online storage site and they won't get hacked / stolen.


Question:

20-30 years ago would you have put all your naked pictures, credit card info and other personal info in a shoebox and stored it at a strangers garage? If you would you're an idiot and deserve to get it stolen or looked at.

That's all your doing now by storing it at some site.

Don't worry whether the phones are secure or not, just don't put your crap in them.



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:21 PM
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I know that while they couldn't break some of the previous encryption directly, they simply set up servers that handled the communications so they could get into the messages indirectly. Don't ask me on specifics because I am not technical like that, but for those in the know, maybe you get what I'm saying...

Is this similar? Don't know. But could be.



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: 8675309jenny

I agree that this is a smokescreen. It does look to me as if there may be another level here.

I think local LEOs may not get access as the FBI plays the eternal, we are the 'bestest' while trying to outdo all of the other agencies.

I would not be surprised if the Chinese could read every phone on the planet, hell, they manufacture all of them.

Code is getting so deep that most companies will not error check and as proof of that you need only to look at some of the recent OS debacles, let alone bendable phones.

P



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:35 PM
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originally posted by: boncho
I know that while they couldn't break some of the previous encryption directly, they simply set up servers that handled the communications so they could get into the messages indirectly. Don't ask me on specifics because I am not technical like that, but for those in the know, maybe you get what I'm saying...

Is this similar? Don't know. But could be.


Yeah, you're talking about Stingray:
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:35 PM
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Unless they've developed capability in the past few years, the FBI probably can't efficiently 'get into' your data. Furthermore, it's probably against the law and FBI policy to try and do so surreptitiously. If they want your data, they're going to get it, because they are going to make you very willingly give it up.

The NSA can (and it doesn't take no 33 seconds either). The NSA does ... and in their defense ... they can't help but do it. What they don't do 'after' is break the law. The NSA doesn't go around spying on 'Joe American' just because they can. That's against the law ... and every employee of the NSA is aware of this. Not very many people are dumb enough to risk their careers over "stoopit".

I wouldn't buy an iPhone just because it's advertised as secure. Seriously? Would you?



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: boncho
I know that while they couldn't break some of the previous encryption directly, they simply set up servers that handled the communications so they could get into the messages indirectly. Don't ask me on specifics because I am not technical like that, but for those in the know, maybe you get what I'm saying...

Is this similar? Don't know. But could be.


That's the "man-in-the-middle" attack. It doesn't matter how fancy, complicated, convoluted or devious your encryption scheme is, they just pretend to be where you want to talk to, have the data decrypted, read it, then encrypt it again and send it on to where it was supposed to go.




edit on 5-10-2014 by stormcell because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:37 PM
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I think you are absolutely right. Its just a smokescreen. Make the people feel comfortable and feel like they have a small victory. They can and always will be able to spy on you. You know, they dont even need a phone to do it anymore. Why do you really think everyone had to change to digital television in 2010? Along with many other means of surveillance.
edit on 5-10-2014 by thesmokingman because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:39 PM
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I have an android phone, and while the FBI may not be able to access your phones contents, that is if it is even locked, I'm sure they have the capability to see all communications, like texts and calls and even GPS locations. Basically what they are saying is they can't get past the pattern lock on iPhone 6? Like they don't already know where you've been? OK maybe they are not on the NSA's level? It seems to me they just need to harvest the data stream to get that information, but what they are saying is for criminals already arrested they can't just look at the contents of their phone. weird.

I don't really see why they should have to have access to OUR devices if they are really ours. Shouldn't the people decide who accesses their personal device?

Privacy is no where close to what it needs to be in the US. And I could point out, like throwaway cell-phones, if it doesn't already exist there will be a blackmarket for it, and then only criminals will have access to privacy tech. LOL way to go Merica


I just want to add the somewhere in the constitution it says we have to right to not incriminate ourselves. If submitting my phone for analysis would incriminate me how is this not unconstitutional? Our constitutional rights have been hijacked. The phone, my belongings, my property, my DNA, is all an extension of my person. I think we need to look to Spain who has the policy of not going into peoples homes, as they are off limits. The home is a sacred place. It would save lives to wait outside, and arrest down the road/in driveway.

edit on 5-10-2014 by nrd101 because: should was missing?!!



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

My thoughts exactly...

Reverse psychology, make them think they're safe from prying eyes when all the while they're really being watched.



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: nrd101

Sorry, can't copy the portion of your post I'm replying to.

I agree with your privacy concerns. The lawmakers do not. They shrug this off like water from a duck's ass. That's why such a major point was made about Merkel's comms and those of 'some' elected US officials.

Bet this: any change will protect 'them' first and 'us' when they get a "round tuit" ... kinda like when Texas tried to make some special rule for elected officials to carry guns ... but not the people. Kinda like how Congress dodged 0bamacare.

I will admit this: it sucks that your # is recorded and can be brought up at a later date to bury you with. But, any ATS member worth his salt ... is in the know.



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 09:27 PM
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a reply to: 8675309jenny


"What concerns me about this is companies marketing something expressly to allow people to place themselves beyond the law."

Not only agree with OP but noted the FBI declaring privacy beyond the law.

Thats beyond the law.



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 09:37 PM
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Trust me, when it comes to Samsung or Apple, there are no surprises. This is another bold lie to ease the convictions we have about being spied on 24/7. Probably because we are being spied on 24/7, by people who put themselves above the law. Is there an echo?



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: 8675309jenny

Their move worked. I've witnessed with my own eyes someone switch to A new iPhone from throw aways cause "they are safe finally"

I even spelled it out for this guy clear as day the play the Feds were at with this overly in our face whining about not being able to get into phones and he still said "their encrypted now".....

I then asked him if he even knew what encryption meant... His answer... And I quote "it means they can't get into my phone" ... Lol

This is one of the most amazing successful massive psy ops I've ever seen. Flat out the spell stuck.

The only thought I have is what are they going to do with all the new data? If they start scooping people up and prosecuting based on phone evidence like 1990ish - 2006ish people will just swap back to throw aways again like from 2004ish - present. A quick guess I have is they are just going to mine the data for leads and other connecting information but not actual case evidence. Try to use it to grab only the people absolutely deemed necessary and the ones they can prosecute without using the phone information. This will keep the phone data flying in. Just a guess tho.



posted on Oct, 5 2014 @ 10:16 PM
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originally posted by: tridentblue

originally posted by: boncho
I know that while they couldn't break some of the previous encryption directly, they simply set up servers that handled the communications so they could get into the messages indirectly. Don't ask me on specifics because I am not technical like that, but for those in the know, maybe you get what I'm saying...

Is this similar? Don't know. But could be.


Yeah, you're talking about Stingray:
en.wikipedia.org...


Kind of the same idea...
edit on 5-10-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 04:27 AM
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originally posted by: 8675309jenny

Well played FBI, I have nothing to hide anyway, .


A sad statement to make that is.

How sad it is that people who say things like this do not realise that it is not they who are going to make the decision as whether or not they have anything to hide.

Whether or not you have anything to hide or whether or not you have done anything wrong it going to be decided by someone sitting in front of a computer screen somewhere in the world then the people across the other side of the desk in a police station will decide whether or not you have done anything wrong or if you have anything to hide.

You will have no say it.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: boncho

If you're talking about man-in-the-middle attacks its the same idea. They place a device to act as a cell tower, and they decrypt the cell communications, record them, and pass them on.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: tridentblue
a reply to: boncho

If you're talking about man-in-the-middle attacks its the same idea. They place a device to act as a cell tower, and they decrypt the cell communications, record them, and pass them on.


No Im talking about intelligence agencies setting up php servers in the islands and selling the php devices through the black market. It came up in a few court cases in the last few years, as well as intelligence reports.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: 8675309jenny Notice they are complaining about it EVERY day to make sure that EVERYONE knows they "can't" read your phone anymore. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!! That's just too funny.



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