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Is Ebola Airborne - Is This Proof?

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posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: ArmyOfNobunaga

Can you provide us with some examples of truly airborne viruses?




posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 09:21 PM
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a reply to: ArmyOfNobunaga

Why don't you can the attitude? It does nothing for your credibility.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: Staroth

It does not have to be airborne the way people are allowed to fly where ever they like in the world with almost no restriction.

The idiots that are handling this event just count the people that the infected ones come into direct contact with, how about the people they pass on the street or are in the emergency room where the guy that just flew into the U.S. sat in for how long pucking and coughing.

The "canary in the cage " is going to be the apartment complex this guy was at with his family, it will either bust out with Ebola or we will just not hear about it any more after it mysteriously catch's fire... IMO


edit on 3-10-2014 by Battleline because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 09:40 PM
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From all the info posted so far in this thread and from my own snooping on the internet, line between AIRBORNE and AEROSOL transmission seems blury at best and nonexistent at worst. I haven't been able to find any concrete explaination of how an airborne virus travels vs how a virus that can travel in aerosol form differ.

But to me it sounds like there is NO difference except for how long a specific virus can live outside the host. And it sounds like ebola can survive for a few hours at LEAST.

So is it ok to be in, lets say, a classroom in the opposite side of the room from someone with ebola who is symptomatic (coughing and sneezing)?

I highly doubt it.

Here is something I found about influenza, since I couldn't find anything similar for ebola but it attempts to explain...


Droplet or Aerosol?
Influenza is thought to be transmitted primarily by droplets (particles ≥ 5 μm, and settling within 3-6 feet); however, the airborne route (particles < 5 μm remaining suspended in air) has been implicated in special situations, such as aerosol-generating procedures. Discussion has been ongoing between the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and healthcare epidemiologists on the relative role of the airborne route, especially during the 2009-2010 influenza season with the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 strain.


SOURCE

Here is the description of the stucture of the ebola virus vs the influenza virus... ebola is clearly bigger and heavier.
This is from their respective wikipedia pages.


Structure - EBOLA

In general, ebola virions are 80 nm in width, but vary somewhat in length. In general, the median particle length of ebola viruses ranges from 974 to 1,086 nm, but particles as long as 14,000 nm have been detected in tissue culture.

Structure - INFLUENZA

Influenza viruses A, B and C are very similar in overall structure.The virus particle is 80–120 nanometers in diameter and usually roughly spherical, although filamentous forms can occur

edit on pm032014102014Friday by adomol because: (no reason given)


It would seem that ebola IS airborne, just for a shorter amount of time then something like the flu.
edit on pm032014102014Friday by adomol because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 09:56 PM
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originally posted by: Bone75
a reply to: ArmyOfNobunaga

Can you provide us with some examples of truly airborne viruses?


Here's a website. Colorful pictures too ... score!!

I find it odd ... and a bit troubling ... that Penn State has classified Ebola as an airborne pathogen. I wonder exactly when Ebola found its place in their database?
edit on 3102014 by Snarl because: Bold emphasis



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: adomol


i think that's some damn significant information there. basically.... ebola is transmitted the same way the flu is. i did google after reading your post and everything i find is that the flu is transmitted by aerosol particles.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 10:05 PM
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originally posted by: MrNeo


Then, two weeks after the incident with the bloody glove, something frightening happened in the Ebola rooms. The two healthy monkeys developed red eyes and blood noses, and they crashed and bled out. They had never been deliberately infected with Ebola virus, and they had not come near the sick monkeys. They were separated from the sick monkeys by open floor. If a healthy person were placed on the other side of a room from a person who was sick with AIDS, the AIDS virus would not be able to drift across the room through the air and infect the healthy person. But Ebola had drifted across a room. It had moved quickly, decisively, and by an unknown route. Most likely the control monkeys inhaled it into their lungs. "It got there somehow," Nancy Jaax would say to me as she told me the story some years later. "Monkeys spit and throw stuff. And when the caretakers wash the cages down with water hoses, that can create an aerosol of droplets. It probably traveled through the air in aerosolized secretion. That was when I knew that Ebola can travel through the air."


From "The Hot Zone" (pg.65) a collection of true stories of Ebola outbreaks and close calls.
True story.

If you don't know what "extreme amplification" and "level 4" is you may want to read it..
learn.flvs.net...


thanks for the link reading book now.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: pasiphae

Here is the CDC press conference from a couple of days ago and it does get anything clearer than straight from the horses mouth. Our horse being Dr. Tom Frieden...

LISTEN CLOSELY AT 4:39




posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: Staroth

Aerosol means cough/sneeze. Droplets in the air. A disease can spread yhat way and still not be considered airborne. Its considered airborne when the virus stays aloft for extended periods of time. Measles for example you can walk into a room where someone with measles is or has been and catch it. Cough and sneeze droplets are heavy and settle quickly.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: MarlinGrace


SO, it is a picture. It doesn't mean that it was used there. If i have a picture of flying monkey's i put on the screen, does this mean we have to watch out for flying monkey's too. Click your heals together dorathy, the wicked witch is comming and the master is pulling the strings behind the curtains.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: adomol

That video has been cut in so many places it's starting to bleed. Watch his head magically appear in different places. This video is soooooo edited. I call BUSTED.



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: cloaked4u

What are you even talking about?

Here is the link to the CDC's own website, from their press release archive. It includes the full UNEDITED press conference WITH full transcript. Read it yourself. I doubt the CDC would edit a video and transcript to actually put anymore heat on themselves then they already have.

Get your head out of the sand Clyde.

www.cdc.gov...


Ultimately, we are all connected by the air we breathe.


edit on am042014102014Saturday by adomol because: Including Dr. Tom Frieden's quote



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 12:32 AM
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a reply to: AshOnMyTomatoes

You are grossly wrong!
The CDC states that it can live for Several Hours!



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 02:46 AM
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a reply to: Cobaltic1978

I just wanted to reply to someone - I think Ebola may have become more easily airborne, but I don't think it has become airborne, I think that would lead to a lot more people infected.

At the moment, it has a limit; for example, if someone sneezes, the virus doesn't travel around the city and stick to a sign post where it hibernates until the next rainfall.

So basically, you have to be within range of the sneeze in order to contract the virus, while other viruses must be able to float around and stick to surfaces without the cover of a water droplet.
edit on 04amSat, 04 Oct 2014 02:48:25 -0500kbamkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 03:00 AM
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originally posted by: cloaked4u
a reply to: MarlinGrace


SO, it is a picture. It doesn't mean that it was used there. If i have a picture of flying monkey's i put on the screen, does this mean we have to watch out for flying monkey's too. Click your heals together dorathy, the wicked witch is comming and the master is pulling the strings behind the curtains.



SO, people provide pictures and source info, you say it isn't true and we should all drop our keyboards and hail the intellect as if your truth is the final truth? We should just stop posting and wait for you to dispense the truths for all to see?



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 03:34 AM
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I think the arguments about whether Ebola is airborne or not are kind of silly at a laymen's level.

This discussion would be akin to arguing over whether or not humans could fly. Strictly speaking...no humans cannot fly. Humans can however get on a plane and are borne by that plane through the air. So we say that humans have taken to the sky and that we can "fly" to another country.

I realize that in discussing the term "airborne" medically there are stricter definitions and that Ebola may not be "airborne" in the same way the flu is "airborne." While Ebola may not be "airborne" it is certainly "aerosol borne" and aerosols are in fact "airborne." So Ebola in a sense can fly.

Since Ebola can fly and since it only take's one viral organism to infect a host, it's not like one would have to handle or ingest blood, puke, or poop to get it. Getting EVD could be as easy as someone sneezing next to you in the grocery store or on their hand and then touching a doorknob that you touch shortly thereafter.

I think that's what many are talking about when they say Ebola is "airborne." I also doubt that someone from the non-airborne crowd would be too comfortable around a sneezing coughing Ebola patient for a moment.



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 07:06 AM
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originally posted by: Staroth

originally posted by: ArmyOfNobunaga

originally posted by: Staroth
I'm only going by official gov documents and not news/media or their "experts" and feel free to correct me if I am wrong but to me this clearly says aerosol inhalation lungs.





Human-to human transfer usually occurs through direct contact with bodily fluids
from an infected individual though aerosol transmission can occur between individuals in close proximity
to one another



Both picture and quote on PDF file - Source from the defence.gov.au found here



Huge difference between aerosol and airborne man.

Can you prove that by providing a viable link, because I am reading much different of Wiki and provided a link to my OP. But definitely open to anything more. Thanks in advance



Airborne, aerosols, droplets, nuclei and confusion


Whether propelled by sneezing, coughing, talking, splashing, flushing or some other process, aerosols (an over-arching term) include a range of particle sizes. Those droplets larger than 5-10 millionths of a meter (a micron [µm]; about 1/10 the width of a human hair), fall to the ground within seconds or impact on another surface, without evaporating (see Figure). The smaller droplets that remain suspended in the air evaporate very quickly (< 1/10 sec in dry air), leaving behind particles consisting of proteins, salts and other things left after the water is removed, including suspended viruses and bacteria. These leftovers, which may be more like a gel, depending on the humidity, are called droplet nuclei. They can remain airborne for hours and, if unimpeded, travel wherever the wind blows them. Coughs, sneezes and toilet flushes generate both droplets and droplet nuclei. Droplets smaller than 5-10µm almost always dry fast enough to form droplet nuclei without falling to the ground, and it is usual for scientists to refer to these as being in the airborne size range. It is only the droplet nuclei that are capable of riding the air currents through a hospital, shopping centre or office building.

These cases may actively propel infectious droplets containing vomit and blood across the short distances separating them from caregivers. But this is a form of direct transmission, and is not airborne transmission.


virologydownunder.blogspot.ca...



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: Battleline

Excellent points!



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 08:16 AM
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a reply to: adomol




Our horse being Dr. Tom Frieden...

Agree! He has a very eloquent play on words. Nice catch!



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: GogoVicMorrow




Aerosol means cough/sneeze. Droplets in the air. A disease can spread yhat way and still not be considered airborne. Its considered airborne when the virus stays aloft for extended periods of time. Measles for example you can walk into a room where someone with measles is or has been and catch it. Cough and sneeze droplets are heavy and settle quickly.

I can agree with that. However the Ebola virus is mutating rapidly (ever changing) and we while we don't fully know nor understand this virus' - particularly how it will mutate during our winters; remember we have only seen it mainly in hot temps of Africa and a virus' thrives in colder temps.
The Flu for example blossoms during the winter as most virus' do, this is why we have "the flu season". My main concern with that is if the Ebola starts taking on the same patterns/mutations as other virus do, we could be in for real trouble.
In other words: if the Ebola starts to show patterns/mutations of other virus' during our winter will it become like the flu or the measles? Just that easy to catch?




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