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Is Ebola Airborne - Is This Proof?

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posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:43 PM
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I'm only going by official gov documents and not news/media or their "experts" and feel free to correct me if I am wrong but to me this clearly says aerosol inhalation lungs.





Human-to human transfer usually occurs through direct contact with bodily fluids
from an infected individual though aerosol transmission can occur between individuals in close proximity
to one another


Both picture and quote on PDF file - Source from the defence.gov.au found here

Additional side note added: For those talking about surfaces and temps pertaining to Ebola please read here. It can survive without a host, it thrives in colder conditions.



When dried in tissue culture media onto glass and stored at 4 °C, Zaire ebolavirus survived for over 50 days




Filoviruses have been reported capable to survive for weeks in blood and can also survive on contaminated surfaces


What is Aerosol



An aerosol is a colloid of fine solid particles or liquid droplets, in air or another gas.[1] Examples of aerosols include haze, dust, particulate air pollutants and smoke

Wiki link to aerosol

What is Airborne



An airborne disease is any disease that is caused by pathogens and transmitted through the air. Such diseases include many that are of considerable importance both in human and veterinary medicine. The relevant pathogens may be viruses, bacteria, or fungi, and they may be spread through coughing, sneezing, raising of dust, spraying of liquids, or similar activities likely to generate aerosol particles or droplets

Wiki link to airborne
edit on 3-10-2014 by Staroth because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: Staroth

There's a difference between airborne and aerosol. Being transmitted through an aerosol basically means sneezing or coughing on someone, thereby transmitting small amounts of body fluid. So that means body fluid is still the means of transmittance. Ebola apparently does not last long in the open air, meaning without protection of the small droplets of fluid in the aerosol sneeze or cough, the virus will not survive.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: Staroth
Appears to me you are correct.. I think they are too many cases of ebola for it NOT to be transmitted by air.

The truth will be known when it is too late is my feelings.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: Staroth

Aerosol would mean droplets of bodily fluid, such has mucus or blood being coughed or sneezed. If this is then inhaled by another person, then they would become infected.

Isn't this how most diseases are spread? When you see pictures of the guys trying to contain the disease in their bio hazardous suits, it kind of gives the game away doesn't it?

So it is more than likely that Ebola will become pandemic. So we have that to look forward to, unless ISIL gets us first.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:53 PM
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So officially how long does Ebola last on surfaces? Phones, toilets, doorknobs, computers, tables etc? How does it compare to say the flu virus ?



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:54 PM
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originally posted by: Staroth
I'm only going by official gov documents and not news/media or their "experts" and feel free to correct me if I am wrong but to me this clearly says aerosol inhalation lungs.





Human-to human transfer usually occurs through direct contact with bodily fluids
from an infected individual though aerosol transmission can occur between individuals in close proximity
to one another


Both picture and quote on PDF file - Source from the defence.gov.au found here



Huge difference between aerosol and airborne man.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: GreenMtnBoys

Probably lasts as long as it is contained within a bodily fluid. Once the fluid dries out fully, it doesn't have long without the protection of it.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: GreenMtnBoys

In semen 61 days.

On surfaces looks like its about 6-12 hours... although direct sunlight and temperature makes this vary greatly.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: AshOnMyTomatoes
a reply to: Staroth

There's a difference between airborne and aerosol. Being transmitted through an aerosol basically means sneezing or coughing on someone, thereby transmitting small amounts of body fluid. So that means body fluid is still the means of transmittance. Ebola apparently does not last long in the open air, meaning without protection of the small droplets of fluid in the aerosol sneeze or cough, the virus will not survive.


Yes, there's a difference between what the medical community means by 'aerosol' or 'airborne' and what the general public would take that to mean. Ebola has been called 'heavy' in that it is supposed to be a heavy particle that drops to the ground and therefore safe to be around a patient; I call BS on this because frankly, sneezes and coughs and the wind can go a long way towards moving a 'particle' around that's the size of nothing at all... and it lives for DAYS in ambient temperatures and household surfaces. Hell, we don't even know the original vectors of this, except possibly bush meat. In many ways, it's a big mystery both due to the dangers of studying it, and the (up to now) remoteness of its victims.

Presume it's transmitted BEFORE the symptoms are obvious, through all possible vectors, until proven otherwise.

That's why it's only been handled in Biosafety Level IV labs with triple gloves, no sharps, negative pressure suits and extreme decontamination procedures on leaving the lab... meanwhile these jackasses are telling you it's okay to sit next to someone on a plane for a 10 hour flight as long as they're not vomiting or bleeding????



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:03 PM
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Airborne diseases include any that are caused by pathogens and transmitted through the air. Some are of great medical importance. The pathogens transmitted may be any kind of microbe, and they may be spread in aerosols of dust or liquids. The aerosols might be generated from sources of infection such as the bodily secretions of an infected animal or person


Such infected aerosols may stay suspended in air currents long enough to travel for considerable distances on air currents


link
edit on 3-10-2014 by Staroth because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:04 PM
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a reply to: Staroth

That is the weaponized Ebola.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:13 PM
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Then, two weeks after the incident with the bloody glove, something frightening happened in the Ebola rooms. The two healthy monkeys developed red eyes and blood noses, and they crashed and bled out. They had never been deliberately infected with Ebola virus, and they had not come near the sick monkeys. They were separated from the sick monkeys by open floor. If a healthy person were placed on the other side of a room from a person who was sick with AIDS, the AIDS virus would not be able to drift across the room through the air and infect the healthy person. But Ebola had drifted across a room. It had moved quickly, decisively, and by an unknown route. Most likely the control monkeys inhaled it into their lungs. "It got there somehow," Nancy Jaax would say to me as she told me the story some years later. "Monkeys spit and throw stuff. And when the caretakers wash the cages down with water hoses, that can create an aerosol of droplets. It probably traveled through the air in aerosolized secretion. That was when I knew that Ebola can travel through the air."


From "The Hot Zone" (pg.65) a collection of true stories of Ebola outbreaks and close calls.
True story.

If you don't know what "extreme amplification" and "level 4" is you may want to read it..
learn.flvs.net...
edit on OctFri, 03 Oct 2014 19:14:37 -05005America/Chicago2014 by MrNeo because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:16 PM
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Here is thing about being "Airborne". It travels in the bodily fluids but unlike aids, droplets of saliva from a cough ingested can infect you so far as I have seen evidence for. Merely having physical contact with somebody who is infected can transfer the disease. This is not the same way a disease like HIV is transmitted, it is MUCH easier to contract Ebola, perhaps as easy as the Flu.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:20 PM
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originally posted by: Helious
Here is thing about being "Airborne". It travels in the bodily fluids but unlike aids, droplets of saliva from a cough ingested can infect you so far as I have seen evidence for. Merely having physical contact with somebody who is infected can transfer the disease. This is not the same way a disease like HIV is transmitted, it is MUCH easier to contract Ebola, perhaps as easy as the Flu.

And isn't it interesting that the Talking Heads on TV are playing it down like it's the flu?

I'm tired of being lied to by the people in power.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:26 PM
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All this means is that if some one is speaking to you and their saliva gets in your mouth it is possible to spread this way.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: Restricted
a reply to: Staroth

That is the weaponized Ebola.


That is the name of the manual, but the what I have posted is a basic description of Ebola from their manual. If you scroll down the next disease is Foot and mouth disease virus along with it's description and so on.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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originally posted by: GreenMtnBoys
So officially how long does Ebola last on surfaces? Phones, toilets, doorknobs, computers, tables etc? How does it compare to say the flu virus ?





Filoviruses have been reported capable to survive for weeks in blood and can also survive on contaminated surfaces





When dried in tissue culture media onto glass and stored at 4 °C, Zaire ebolavirus survived for over 50 days

link
I added this to my OP.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:35 PM
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originally posted by: Staroth

originally posted by: GreenMtnBoys
So officially how long does Ebola last on surfaces? Phones, toilets, doorknobs, computers, tables etc? How does it compare to say the flu virus ?





Filoviruses have been reported capable to survive for weeks in blood and can also survive on contaminated surfaces





When dried in tissue culture media onto glass and stored at 4 °C, Zaire ebolavirus survived for over 50 days

link
I added this to my OP.



Lets not let facts get in the way of good doom porn. Eh?



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:36 PM
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"Thrives in cold environments." Just in time for winter, eh?



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: ArmyOfNobunaga

originally posted by: Staroth
I'm only going by official gov documents and not news/media or their "experts" and feel free to correct me if I am wrong but to me this clearly says aerosol inhalation lungs.





Human-to human transfer usually occurs through direct contact with bodily fluids
from an infected individual though aerosol transmission can occur between individuals in close proximity
to one another



Both picture and quote on PDF file - Source from the defence.gov.au found here



Huge difference between aerosol and airborne man.

Can you prove that by providing a viable link, because I am reading much different of Wiki and provided a link to my OP. But definitely open to anything more. Thanks in advance



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