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Major defect found in Typhoon aircraft

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posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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A major manufacturing defect has been found in both British and German Typhoon aircraft. German sources say that it could cause the aft fuselage to become unstable. They have suspended deliveries of new aircraft, and cut flight hours for existing aircraft in half. The British announced that they were also cutting flight hours in half.

www.businessinsider.com...

www.aerosociety.com...




posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Wow. When I bought my laptop, the salesman said it would last about three years because of planned obsolescence. I'm on my fourth year with it and it is barely still functioning.

However irrational it may sound, I wonder if this race to market and sell planes is not a form of that, not properly designing, developing, and testing before delivery and sales. Look at the F-35s, Canada thought they would buy some then when the whole country objected, we were exorbitantly penalized for canceling the order. Nice business to be in huh? The finished product does not seem to be as important as making a profit on canceled orders. Just my opinion here, but I really wonder if that it's the name of the new game.


edit on 2-10-2014 by aboutface because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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It would be nice if they could be more forthcoming, Eurofighter is a fantastic airplane. Saw one this summer, and last summer at the festival of flight in Newcastle, Co Down, the lowdown noise rattles your chest. I wonder what the problem is..maybe the power is stretching the airframe apart through sonic vibrations flying low....same as my chest.

edit on 2-10-2014 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

They may not be entirely sure yet. It may be a case of doing an inspection of an airframe and seeing something odd, then finding it on others. I'm sure more will come out in the next week or so.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Could this be similar to the F-15 Longerons. Just that they caught it before a catastrophic failure?



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Yeah, it could be something like that, or an aft bulkhead crack.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 07:00 PM
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Seems like some kind of modal resonance problem. They can be some of the worst problems, because it involves the net additive effects that take the entire fuselage into consideration. These are some of the most fundamental problems looked at during the early design of the aircraft, and it is puzzling why it would show up at this stage of the game.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: smurfy

They may not be entirely sure yet. It may be a case of doing an inspection of an airframe and seeing something odd, then finding it on others. I'm sure more will come out in the next week or so.


True enough, but it does say, 'manufacturing defect' and the initial reports came from the RAF, then the Luftwaffe and so far, none of the rest. So there might be be something in common with those two air forces, or the way they have been flown twixt and between the two as against the rest. It does seem to hint then that the 'manufacturing defect' is either specific to the RAF and the Luftwaffe.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 07:27 PM
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The rear fuse is built at Samlesbury. Some of the first few tail fins (about 6 I think) were all defected as they laid the carbon fibre incorrectly.

This is then attached to the rear fuse by some brackets, there are a couple of machined ribs but it's mainly cowling and engine doors. It was designed (in part) for easy maintenance, so the whole bottom of the jet opens, an engine winch attached and you drop the engine.

Will be interested to see how this turns out.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

It must be flying hours and number of aircraft to test. The airframes are identical.


RAB

posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:07 PM
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I find this odd according to the update on:

www.defenseindustrydaily.com...

BAE Systems and Britain’s RAF reportedly discovered that some of the rivet holes in the rear fuselage of the jet were drilled in ways that could introduce splinters and cracks into the rear fuselage, giving it less ability to resist wear and tear.

Well if that's true we have a serious problem as BAE systems built the rear fuselage and did most of the design work, I cannot see them not following the spec for deburing that they helped to design and set out.

Also the Germans have announced they intend to keep the tornado until 2020, with the life extension of the Tornado and this Typhoon news that may kill brimstone and storm shadow integration work. Leaving the typhoon as a short life one trick pony.

hmmm interesting times

RAB
edit on 3-10-2014 by RAB because: Spelling



posted on Oct, 4 2014 @ 04:20 AM
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a reply to: RAB
Yeah, German reports are talking about not deburred rivet holes, with sharp edges as points of high stress increasing the risk of cracking.




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