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Top 10 Ebola Quotes by Health Experts

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posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:35 AM
This is an excellent compilation of Pollyanna-ish Ebola quotes from health experts. The BOLD comments are mine.

#1 Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: “We feel confident that there won’t be an outbreak.”

Um, how are you feeling now, Dr. Fauci?

#2 University of Chicago professor Michael Z. David: “While this all sounds very frightening, there’s no need to worry at this point about Ebola spreading widely here.”
Can you define "spreading widely?"

#3 Gerardo Chowell-Puente, an associate professor of mathematical epidemiology at the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University: “Math and history show us that decisive efforts to isolate those who are infected with Ebola and to follow up quickly with the potential contacts of the infected can help to get an outbreak under control. We’re lucky that we have such capacities in the United States; even with the Ebola case in Dallas, the epidemic should not get much of a foothold here.”
Not much of a foothold, well. It's good to know that math and history are on our side, as opposed to, say, a global effort to get the outbreak "under control."

#4 Texas Health Director David Lakey: “This is a very sophisticated city, a very sophisticated hospital, … and the chances of it being spread are very, very scarce.”
Hmm, how did a 'very sophisticated hospital' prescribe antibiotics for a viral illness? Fail to inform the triage leader that a patient had arrived from Liberia? Oh, forget it. My head is hurting very, very badly; the pain was initiated by all of this double talk.

#5 Zachary Thompson, director of Dallas County Health & Human Services: “This is not Africa. We have a great infrastructure to deal with an outbreak.”
So, paved roads and easy access to interstates should wrap this up? Let's back up and look at the structure of US hospitals, specifically how to deal with body fluids of the infected, not to mention bodies. According to the NYT and the NY Post, US hospitals are STILL trying to figure out a way to handle waste products from Ebola patients. Let's see, you''ve had how long to come up with an answer?

#6 Dr. William Shaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center: “We’re very prepared: Infection-control people in hospitals over the past two months have been reviewing all their infection- control procedures because we anticipated just this sort of thing happening—a person coming from West Africa, they were healthy at the time they traveled, but got sick here.”
Vanderbilt is a case in point of the right hand not knowing what the left is doing. I suppose you fired the person who tagged the wrong leg of the person who received an amputation?

#7 Thomas Frieden, the director of the CDC: “It is certainly possible that someone who has had contact with this patient could develop Ebola, but there is no doubt in my mind that we will stop it here.” Oh, please.

Blah, blah, blah.

#8 Dr. William Shaffner: “Even Doctors Without Borders in West Africa are moving the fatality rate from 50 percent down to 30 percent—I bet we can do substantially better than that here.”
And just look at how well 'we' have done so far. Sent an infected patient home? Check. Great job, Dr. Shaffner.

#9 Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine and professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston: “The Ebola virus is not easily transmitted from person to person, and we have an outstanding infrastructure in place both to contain the virus and trace contacts. There will not be an Ebola epidemic in the United States.”
Well, I'm just so relieved. Should I not stock up on bottled water and Ramen noodles, then?

#10 Thomas Frieden: “The bottom line here is that I have no doubt that we will control this importation or this case of Ebola so that it does not spread widely throughout this country.”

Not you again. How many bottom lines are there, Tommy Boy? "Control this importation??" That's a new one. And thanks for letting us know that Ebola won't spread too widely through the US. I will look forward to a narrow contagion.

edit on 2-10-2014 by drwill because: (no reason given)

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:51 AM
a reply to: drwill

Why would anyone want to live a life consumed by speculative thoughts of low probability outcomes?

Someone or something may be orchestrating this hysteria. IDK.... Mossad, The Russians, USG? Too many bad actors to list.

Stay rational and wash your hands.... I mean NOW! RUN!!!!! LOL.

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:02 AM
a reply to: drwill

Aside from poor triage, I wonder if the patient himself proffered the information that he was coming from Liberia. Surely when he became ill, he must have feared and suspected ebola, but perhaps fear prevented him from saying so.

I think a visible sign ought to be put up on all ERs for patients to notify staff of any recent travel to ebola outbreak countries. In that way there should be a double check up front and shared responsibility.

edit on 2-10-2014 by aboutface because: (no reason given)

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:16 AM
Aside from getting ebola, the thought that I might have given it to someone else is a terrible burden to carry, especially if I were to recover and many others of my contacts die.

If we behave just as we were supposed to during the SARS, there should be no problem. Good hygiene, (I carry a small bottle of that hand cleanser in my purse) avoiding crowds and unnecessary travel and above all using common sense while remaining alert should keep us and our loved ones safe.

Now if the idiots at the microphones who supply sound bytes to the masses were to accurately teach instead of trying to gain publicity points, then the public would be less panicked, imo.

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:38 AM
a reply to: aboutface
IMHO, the real panic hasn't even started. Many are happy to drink the Kool-Aid that Dallas officials are serving.

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:47 AM
a reply to: drwill

At this point it's either kool aid or poison. The second Americans give into the rising fears that even the most determined of ostriches are feeling it's all over anyways. Panic will only make things worse.

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 12:06 PM

originally posted by: aboutface
a reply to: drwill

Aside from poor triage, I wonder if the patient himself proffered the information that he was coming from Liberia. Surely when he became ill, he must have feared and suspected ebola, but perhaps fear prevented him from saying so.

It was stated by the director from the hospital that the patient did indeed tell the first nurse who saw him that he came from Liberia. The nurse did not inform the doctors of that little piece of information and then they sent him home with antibiotics. The dude actually tried to play safe and was bounced by the system.

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 01:07 PM

there is no doubt in my mind that we will stop it here.”

This one gets me every time. He keeps saying it as if this is a one time thing. "Okay folks, we've reached the required minimum amount of cases we can all go home and sleep easy knowing that 'we stopped it here' it's done for good, let's go get a drink."

Unless we stop, at the least, commercial/non-import export flights we will get more cases. There's also a BIG IF they're even able to round up all of his contacts.
What about the guy or gal that used the public restroom after him? Or guy from the waste desposal company that touched something contaminated emptying the dumpster? You all know, the list is the energizer bunny, it keeps going and going.
edit on 10 2 2014 by MDpvc because: Fixed coding mistake

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 05:25 PM
People have to realize, that Ebola would not have spread that wide in West Africa if the people would not keep their ill people at home and just dump the corpses on the roads.
Or the patients that go outside, totally sick, and # themselves and vomit everywhere....
Furthermore the people there still do not believe that Ebola exists and do not care about proper hygiene to prevent infections.
Look at the most recent Vice reports, really surprising.

This stuff in the reason it spread out of control there.
I doubt that the same will happen in more developed countries.

posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 06:39 PM
a reply to: aLLeKs

People are ignorant everywhere including the United States. Your faith in the human animal is wasted.

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