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can a plane made of wood fly supersonic?

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posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:18 PM
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like the title says, can a aircraft made of wood break the sound barrier?

im thinking no but im not sure




posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:30 PM
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I would guess at no, I don't think a wooden structure would be able to handle the speed, it would just break apart.

I could be wrong but I definitely wouldn't want to be the guy sat in the wooden cockpit testing it out!



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:34 PM
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Apparently yes, it is possible...

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: adomol

And we all miss Howard Hughes, who would have built a wooden spaceship by now. Remember the Spruce Goose? The biggest plane ever made, and made from wood, it only flew once and then was mothballed/exhibited.

en.wikipedia.org...


edit on 1-10-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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Magic wood could
2nd line same as the first



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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i dont think theres anyreason why not other than being pointless.
but wood is quite capable of going faster than sound.
its not fast enough to burn it so if the construstion is ok , yes



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: Rikku

Then I guess the next logical question would be... can a spaceship made of wood travel superluminal?

Hmmm...

edit on pm012014102014Wednesday by adomol because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: theboarman

I have to ask you this. What's "OBAMA IN GAY" mean?

And I yes a plane made of wood if built properly can break the sound barrier. Its all about structural strength, weight, aerodynamics and thrust.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 07:28 PM
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Not on this planet. Neither in space. They will either ignite into flames or disintegrate going against air pressure at that speed. We all seen wooden planes requiring maintenance during WW1 and how easy it is to break apart. This is why WW1 planes were made of Metal sheets first place.
edit on 1-10-2014 by makemap because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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not that im an expert but the de Havilland Mosquito was going 400+ mph in the the 1940s with piston engines, so why not. would be cool to see would it not, a wooden plane thrashing a modern day subsonic jet plane



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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Well, the right paint additives coupled to an electric plasma charge on the shell and it could be possible if the design was right.
Actually I have no clue if it is possible, but wanted to say something cool about this.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:17 PM
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DeHavilland did it in the late 1940's. The plane was built with the same wood techniques as with the Mosquito fighter-bombers.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:18 PM
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You'd only be limited by the laminates you used for the wood.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: LoneGunMan

it was for another thread i was going to make but didn't, since the mods removed it, and i don't want this thread to get deleted, ill say search Google



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:30 PM
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Well the entire thing could not be made out of wood, but theoretically the majority of the structure could be made out of wood and still achieve such a velocity. One of the main components would be the outer shell, some type of coating that could withstand the increased temperatures of supersonic flight, which would reach hundreds of degrees F. I imagine that wood exposed to such temperatures would fail in some manner, and a failure of any portion of the structure at those speeds would likely result in an overall failure. And if everything is wooden, this means the pilot is also wooden...And a wooden pilot does not possess a brain and therefore could not operate an aircraft. That is foolproof logic right there, lol.
edit on 10/1/14 by JiggyPotamus because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 12:39 AM
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originally posted by: JiggyPotamus. One of the main components would be the outer shell, some type of coating that could withstand the increased temperatures of supersonic flight, which would reach hundreds of degrees F.


You have to be going quite fast for aerodynamic heating generally. Mach 1 at 30,000' is probably going to give you a surface temp somewhere around 60F (air temp at 30,000' is around -55F, so aerodynamic or kinetic heating is being absorbed by the airflow).

Some of that depends on altitude (or density of the air). Some of that is going to depend on the shape of the airframe. The more the shape slows the airflow as it contacts the surface area, the more heat is built. Some of the heat is going to radiate through the airframe. We could design our fuel tanks to absorb some of that heat at the leading edges of the wings, for example, to catch more heat.Some will radiate back into the air.

It's also proportional to the square of the airspeed, so it is going to build up quickly. A rule of thumb is, if you slowed the air at sea level 100% (and you won't even with a brick shape), you would increase the temp by about 100C at 1000mph (Mach 1.3). That's below the burning temp of wood, though we might get some smouldering at the nose and wingtips. At 2000mph (Mach 2.6), we're up to 400C. Now we've got problems even with most metals. At 3000mph (3.9M), we're at 900C.

Now those numbers are at sea level, and no one generally goes that fast at sea level because the air is thicker (drag, and kinetic heating) and warmer there. We'd probably only get about 85% of that heat at the hottest parts of the airframe because of aerodynamic shaping. Going to a higher altitude is going to help because the air temp is a lot colder at altitude, and the density/mass of the air is substantially less. The SR-71 experienced "only" about 240C heating at cruise at very high-altitude. Plenty hot enough to destroy wood, but also going three times the speed of sound.

Wood would be fine temp wise at Mach 1.1. Structurally, you're going to take a beating in transonic flight just from the turbulent airflow over the structure. But not heat.

So could it be done with wood? Sure, if we make the airframe strong enough to pass through the transonic state, and we do it at altitudes higher than 27,000' ASL.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 01:07 AM
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a reply to: theboarman

I would think a wooden plane built strong enough to handle the engines necessary and stresses would be too heavy. Light weight metals are much stronger at much lighter overall weights.

Just my opinion though, I don't know anything about planes.
edit on 2-10-2014 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 01:07 AM
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a reply to: _Del_

what is the aircraft in your picture? a prototype for the taranis drone?

second line.
edit on 2-10-2014 by theboarman because: second line



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 01:13 AM
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a reply to: adomol

Might be a little iffy, but if it is possible I would guess it would be utilizing dives. I wasn't thinking of that just considering engine power, take off and achieve super sonic speed.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 01:28 AM
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originally posted by: theboarman
a reply to: _Del_

what is the aircraft in your picture? a prototype for the taranis drone?


It's a Teledyne-Ryan Model 262. It was the great, granpappy of Taranis if you want to look at it that way.




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