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the bad a** women thread......lets bring the noise

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posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 07:56 AM
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i just finished reading a book about phoolan devi.... she was a bad ass so i figured i would list a few ladies who i think fit the bad ass category. i hope this thread takes off. introduce us to some awesome woman. i dont mean bad ass as in only tough...here are a few people to start with

please list some as i am always looking for reading material

phoolan devi
en.wikipedia.org...

she was the 'bandit queen'. she was married off by her parents when she was 11. raped and tortured by her husband and others till she was like 15. she got away from the situation and became a bandit. stealing from the rich and giving to the poor. she also gave punishment to men who raped by cutting off their 'serpents'..she did time in prison when she was 15. she wound up being elected to parliament before being assassinated.
she was a tough lady
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golda meir
en.wikipedia.org...

the iron lady of israeli politics. she was the one that gave the order for mossad to go after the black september group that killed the israeli athletes at the 76 olympics.
she didnt take any #
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hedy lamarr
en.wikipedia.org...

born in germany and moved to the states. she was an actress in the 30;s. in 1933 she did full frontal and acted out an orgasm. unheard of then. thats not why she is awesome though. she was super smart. she learned about torpedos from her neighbor and decided they could be jammed to easily. she helped to develop frequency hopping to control the signal so it couldnt be jammed and the torpedo taken off course.
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calamity jane
en.wikipedia.org...

ex prostitute turned gunfighter. she loved the bottle and was an on and off alcoholic but she was tough. a frontierswoman and a scout back when ladies didnt do that. 'fought' indians all through whyoming with wild bill...
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joan of arc
en.wikipedia.org...

the heroine of france.. born a peasant and took up the fight.
dressed up as a guy to go on military campaigns. eventually got burned at the stake as we all know
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marie curie
en.wikipedia.org...
she was a physicist and chemist. did pioneering work with radioactivity. first person to win the nobel prize. first person and the only woman to win it twice. only person to win twice in multiple sciences. first woman to become a professor at the university of paris.
she did all kinds of cool stuff. she discovered elements and isolated radioactive isotopes. of course she was exposed to a lot of radiation and died in a sanitarium of aplastic anemia. apparently she used to carry test tubes of radium around in her pocket.




posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: CardiffGiant
Nancy Botwin
Nancy Botwin Wiki

She excitedly jumps on the opportunity to traffic pot across the border at the beginning of season four but is uncomfortable with transporting other drugs like heroin and child-prostitute smuggling. She also has trouble respecting the "chain of command" within the drug cartel and sometimes blatantly violates its rules.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:12 AM
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There was a young lady of 14 years at the time of the 1st crusade 1000ad or so. She was betrothed to a Swedish Prince and went with him on the crusade as they were to be married in Jerusalem once it was captured. The band of Crusader knights were ambushed by the Turks and she died in battle with sword in hand at the side of her Crusader prince. She was known as the Maiden of Burgundy.

Now I have to search through boxes of books so I can correct myself on this, but I have a fair idea where to look.

here she is, Florine of Burgundy.


edit on 1-10-2014 by weirdguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:21 AM
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Babe Didrikson Zaharias

Though best known for her athletic gifts, Didrikson had many talents and was a competitor in even the most domestic of occupations: sewing. An excellent seamstress, she made many of the clothes she wore including her golfing outfits. She claimed to have won the sewing championship at the 1931 State Fair of Texas in Dallas, but in reality won the South Texas State Fair in Beaumont, embellishing the story many years later in 1953. She attended Beaumont High School. Never a strong student, she was forced to repeat the eighth grade and was a year older than her classmates. She eventually dropped out without graduating after she moved to Dallas to play basketball. She was a singer and a harmonica player and recorded several songs on the Mercury Records label. Her biggest seller was "I Felt a Little Teardrop" with "Detour" on the flip side.

Didrikson gained world fame in track and field and All-American status in basketball. She played organized baseball and softball and was an expert diver, roller-skater, and bowler. She won two gold medals and one silver medal for track and field in the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics.

By 1935, she began to play golf, a latecomer to the sport in which she became the most famous. Shortly thereafter, she was denied amateur status, and so, in January 1938, she competed in the Los Angeles Open, a men's PGA (Professional Golfers' Association) tournament, a feat no other woman tried until Annika Sörenstam, Suzy Whaley and Michelle Wie almost six decades later. She shot 81 and 84, and she missed the cut. In the tournament, she was teamed with George Zaharias. They were married eleven months later, and lived in Tampa on the premises of a golf course that they purchased in 1951.

She went on to become America's first female golf celebrity and the leading player of the 1940s and early 1950s. If she had wanted to gain back her amateur status, she would have had to play no other sports for three years. After gaining back her amateur status in 1942, she won the 1946 U.S. Women's Amateur and the 1947 British Ladies Amateur – the first American to do so – and three Women's Western Opens. Having formally turned professional in 1947, she dominated the Women's Professional Golf Association and later the Ladies Professional Golf Association, of which she was a founding member. Serious illness ended her career in the mid-1950s.

Zaharias won a tournament named after her, the Babe Zaharias Open of Beaumont, Texas. She won the 1947 Titleholders Championship and the 1948 U.S. Women's Open for her fourth and fifth major championships. She won 17 straight women's amateur victories, a feat never equaled by anyone. By 1950, she had won every golf title available. Totaling both her amateur and professional victories, Zaharias won a total of 82 golf tournaments.

While Zaharias missed the cut in the 1938 PGA Tour event, later, as she became more experienced, she made the cut in every PGA Tour event she entered. In January 1945, Zaharias played in three PGA tournaments. She shot 76-76 to qualify for the Los Angeles Open.[8] She then shot 76-81 to make the two-day cut in the tournament itself, but missed the three-day cut after a 79, making her the first (and currently only) woman in history to make the cut in a regular PGA Tour event. She continued her cut streak at the Phoenix Open, where she shot 77-72-75-80, finishing in 33rd place. At the Tucson Open, she qualified by shooting 74-81 and then shot a 307 in the tournament and finished tied for 42nd. Unlike other female golfers competing in men's events, she got into the Los Angeles and Tucson Opens through 36-hole qualifiers, as opposed to a sponsor's exemption.

In 1948, she became the first woman to attempt to qualify for the U.S. Open, but her application was rejected by the USGA. They stated that the event was intended to be open to men only.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:28 AM
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Tomoe Gozen

Tomoe Gozen is the most legendary female Samurai warrior of all time. Against all convention, Gozen insisted on fighting alongside her fellow men in the Genpei War. She was immediately recognized as invaluable to the Japanese cause. Her swordsmanship was unparalleled, her skill with archery was legendary and — get this — she was said to have ridden unbroken horses down cliff sides. That's some major Samurai street cred right there. No wonder she is remembered as a "warrior worth one thousand."\


Jennie Irene Hodges aka Albert Cashier

Caught up in the fervor of the Civil War, Jennie Irene Hodges dressed as a man and assumed the name Albert Cashier to serve in the Union Army. She was regarded by her fellow soldiers as quiet and small for a man, but they never suspected her gender. Cashier ended up under the command of Ulysses S. Grant himself, and partook in 40 notoriously bloody battles before she was captured. Small though she was, she overpowered her Confederate captors, and continued to fight until 1865. She didn't discard her male identity after the war, opting instead to vote and receive a proper pension and who can blame her? Both her names are etched on her tombstone.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:50 AM
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Assata Shakur



Her story is literally unbelievable, as in, you have to suspend disbelief when you read it. Probably because it happened all so close to home, but also makes up a much larger narrative including the Black Panthers, 1960-70s Harlem, Tupac and Biggie, and the hip hop culture from the 90s until now.

en.wikipedia.org...


In May 1973, Shakur was involved in a shootout on the New Jersey Turnpike, in which she was accused of killing New Jersey State Trooper Werner Foerster and grievously assaulting Trooper James Harper.[5] BLA member Zayd Malik Shakur was also killed in the incident, and Shakur was wounded.[5] Between 1973 and 1977, Shakur was indicted in relation to six other alleged criminal incidents—charged with murder, attempted murder, armed robbery, bank robbery, and kidnapping—resulting in three acquittals and three dismissals. In 1977, she was convicted of the first-degree murder of Foerster and of seven other felonies related to the shootout.[6] In 2013, the FBI announced it had made Shakur the first woman on its list of most wanted terrorists.[7]

Shakur was incarcerated in several prisons in the 70s. She escaped from prison in 1979 and has been living in Cuba in political asylum since 1984. Since May 2, 2005, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has classified her as a domestic terrorist and offered a $1 million reward for assistance in her capture. On May 2, 2013, the FBI added her to the Most Wanted Terrorist List.
On the same day, the New Jersey Attorney General offered to match the FBI reward, increasing the total reward for her capture to $2 million.[8] Attempts to extradite her have resulted in letters to the Pope and a Congressional resolution. Her life has been portrayed in literature, film and song.[9]

edit on 1-10-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-10-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:54 AM
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If women realize they arnt sup par in anyway, and just as strong or and willed or focused as men....


Men are all doomed!!!

This is clearly nonsense and to be ignored by everyone, yup, chicks are weak and emotionally insane.

Nothing to see here move along



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:56 AM
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originally posted by: jtrenthacker
Tomoe Gozen

Tomoe Gozen is the most legendary female Samurai warrior of all time. Against all convention, Gozen insisted on fighting alongside her fellow men in the Genpei War. She was immediately recognized as invaluable to the Japanese cause. Her swordsmanship was unparalleled, her skill with archery was legendary and — get this — she was said to have ridden unbroken horses down cliff sides. That's some major Samurai street cred right there. No wonder she is remembered as a "warrior worth one thousand."\


.


thanks for that one... going to look her up right now



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:32 AM
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Not to sound corny, but my lady is pretty bad a$$ herself.

Her dad passed away while she was still in high school...had to drop out to help pay the bills - ended up with a GED.
We met in '08, by '10 she was all done with her master's in public administration and is now in her 3rd year of law school.
She works for NYC - dept. of finance - and has a decent 6 figure salary.

In '11 she pulled me out of a bad low point in life and helped turn my life around.

I think she's bad a**.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: boncho


You beat me to it!
Incredible woman.

Here's a fantastic song done for her....very moving.



edit on 1-10-2014 by stargatetravels because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 10:21 AM
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originally posted by: mikeone718
Not to sound corny, but my lady is pretty bad a$$ herself.

Her dad passed away while she was still in high school...had to drop out to help pay the bills - ended up with a GED.
We met in '08, by '10 she was all done with her master's in public administration and is now in her 3rd year of law school.
She works for NYC - dept. of finance - and has a decent 6 figure salary.

In '11 she pulled me out of a bad low point in life and helped turn my life around.

I think she's bad a**.


i hear you man. my wife is my hero and a bad ass herself.
she saved my life from the despair and pain i was in.

she was in labor for 33 hours. she was pushing for 3 hours. no meds. all natural.
she pushed out my 9lb daughter even though she was completely exhausted.

we wok up at 9am on the day her water broke. her water broke at exactly 10pm that night. we went to the hospital and she was awake and in active labor for 30 hours aand then it was 3 hours of pushing.

in my opinion she is super human.
i women do this all the time and have been since the beginning of time.
that said, i was there for all of it. i watched her struggle through labor. i watched her turn down meds. i watched her push out my monster infant.
i could NEVER have done what she did. i would have been crying like a little school girl and been begging them for the strongest meds available.
not my wife man....she was 21 years old and she went through it like a champ.

i love her more than anything and she is my hero. as far as i am concerned she is the toughest lady ailve.....for the child birth reasons and others.....

just saying...i hear ya man....
our wives are awesome



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:15 AM
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i think the middle east could use more women like phoolan devi.

women are still objects over there. they are tortured, raped, and brutilized. they are a second class.
terrible things happened to phoolan...
her father would always tell her that a womans job is to serve a man. a womans job is to do what she is told.
well, that didnt jive with phoolan. maybe things would change over there if more women were like her.

i know it is not up to them to change the way men behave over there. it is not their fault their culture is like that. it is not their fault terrible things happen to them.

that said, i think that region could use more phoolan devi's

she did not kill people at random just for the hell of it. she took from the rich(who took from the poor) and gave to the poor.
if she discovered a rapist she would cut off his penis and tie it around his neck, strip him naked and drag him around the villiage on a leash.
she went from being raped and tortured by men to feared by them.
she went from being lower than dirt to being well respected.

the world needs more phoolan devis for sure



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:15 AM
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i think the middle east could use more women like phoolan devi.

women are still objects over there. they are tortured, raped, and brutilized. they are a second class.
terrible things happened to phoolan...
her father would always tell her that a womans job is to serve a man. a womans job is to do what she is told.
well, that didnt jive with phoolan. maybe things would change over there if more women were like her.

i know it is not up to them to change the way men behave over there. it is not their fault their culture is like that. it is not their fault terrible things happen to them.

that said, i think that region could use more phoolan devi's

she did not kill people at random just for the hell of it. she took from the rich(who took from the poor) and gave to the poor.
if she discovered a rapist she would cut off his penis and tie it around his neck, strip him naked and drag him around the villiage on a leash.
she went from being raped and tortured by men to feared by them.
she went from being lower than dirt to being well respected.

the world needs more phoolan devis for sure



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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I've got a gal friend that falls pretty square in the "bad ass" category.
If I ever find myself in a shtf type scenario she would be one of my first picks as an ally.
She has had one of the roughest life stories of anyone I've ever met.
Lost her family in a house fire at 7 years old and basically raised herself from a young age.
She is not one you want to be on bad terms with.
She's probably barely a buck 20, but I have seen her inflict severe injuries on men twice her size.
Dumped a bookshelf on one and stomped him until his aorta ruptured. He barely survived.
Took another out with a shovel. Just walked up, knocked on the door, and took his knees out when he answered.
Definitely a crazy, I love her all the same. She's quite the looker, too, but my better sense tells it's best to keep it Platonic.
We've gotten drunk and rowdy a few times. I go a little easy, her being a girl and all, but she has bloodied my nose and nearly choked me out when I made the mistake of underestimating her.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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originally posted by: CardiffGiant

originally posted by: jtrenthacker
Tomoe Gozen

Tomoe Gozen is the most legendary female Samurai warrior of all time. Against all convention, Gozen insisted on fighting alongside her fellow men in the Genpei War. She was immediately recognized as invaluable to the Japanese cause. Her swordsmanship was unparalleled, her skill with archery was legendary and — get this — she was said to have ridden unbroken horses down cliff sides. That's some major Samurai street cred right there. No wonder she is remembered as a "warrior worth one thousand."\


.


thanks for that one... going to look her up right now



Could make for a pretty badass samurai movie.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: jtrenthacker

Could make for a pretty badass samurai movie.


oh for sure.
something along the style of 47 ronin with keanu reeves.

i think a lot of people didnt like that flick but i thought it was great.

i would love to see a movie about her made to look the style of 47 ronin.

i am a movie buff and love bio pics.

i would also love to see a bio pic about phoolan devi

there is a bollywood one they made years back but i would like to see an english version



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:21 PM
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well there's a small percentage of guy's that are really feminine. Likewise there are a few ladies that are really masculine.
Woman have been persecuted quite a bit in nearly every society but aborigines who usually hold elder woman with respect.

It's kinda sad we have to compare woman to men when it comes to action and inaction because many men are unwilling to aid in a situation tho men will get physical more often than woman. Woman like to use their mouths for their fights.
That's just basic society tho.

When we get into sciences and stuff both men and woman are brilliant. But we can't have all woman acting recklessly because *The family unit* would be destroyed. men can't give birth so we typically do all the dangerous jobs.
Since men can be replaced but woman require a 50% chance at being replaced and only a woman can replace another woman.
A man cannot replace a woman, Which is why i kinda think switching genders ( As long as the % within society remains under 8 i am fine with it) if to high would be a major problem. Gradually science will want to phase out the natural human altogether and just go straight cyborg that reproduces in a cloning vat.

So when that happens the utility to have genders might not even be part of the *Cloning* process. So the barriers between men and woman will be broken, and woman giving birth will become obsolete. As well as emotions(feelings), at the rate we are going. Its awesome to see that some people are trying to show how all humans deserve an equal chance to change the world for the better. Not all these woman really made the world a better place. I reckon the discovery for radioactive icytopes could of been left out for another 80 years. Just my opinion. Same as that cop murderer that was posted in the thread.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: AnuTyr

thanks for contributing absolutely nothing to the topic at hand....
who cares what marie curie did right?



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: CardiffGiant

My mother and grandmother are two of the strongest women I know and both an inspiration to me and my sister. My grandmother raised 3 children on her own in 1950-1970's all while running her own Beauty Salon.

Anne Boleyn, she ended up loosing her head but changed the course of religious practices and history for better or worse.

Eleanor of Aquitaine, Duchess in her own right, mother to 3 Kings (although Henry passed before attaining the throne.) She was Queen of France and Queen of England. Strong women in the 12th and 13th century were quite rare, she was bold and wasn't afraid to speak her mind. She paid the price for her actions but still fought for her freedom.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 06:05 AM
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a reply to: CardiffGiant

Great thread! A very small selection of my favourite women.


Agnodice


Agnodice or Agnodike (c. 4th century BCE) (Gr. Ἀγνοδίκη) was the first female Athenian physician, midwife, and gynecologist, whose life was recounted by Gaius Julius Hyginus.[1] Hyginus, who lived in the 1st century BCE, wrote about Agnodice in his Fabulae.[2]



Agnodice was born into a wealthy family in Athens, Greece. Her desire to become a physician initiated from witnessing increased numbers of women dying or undergoing painful childbirths. Though women were allowed to learn gynecology, obstetrics, healing, and midwifery in the time of Hippocrates, after his death the leaders of Athens discovered that women were performing abortions, and made becoming a female doctor a capital crime.[3] Agnodice, determined to become a physician and help the women of Athens, cut her hair and donned the clothes of a man to pursue medical training. Agnodice then used an alleged friend’s sickness to account for her future leave to pursue medical training.[4] She then left Athens to study medicine in nearby Egypt, where women played an important role in the medical community.[4]



When male physicians began to see that their services were no longer desired by women, the male physicians began to accuse Agnodice for seducing the women and the women were accused of feigning illnesses.[5] Agnodice was then tried before a group of jealous husbands and rival doctors for seducing the women of Athens. When Agnodice was brought before the court assembled on a hill near Athens called Areopagus, the men began to condemn her. She then lifted her tunic to reveal her true identity and was condemned further by the men of Athens for her deceit and false pretenses.[3] With a crime warranted of execution if carried out, Agnodice then convinced the judges that it was impossible she could be guilty of the alleged crimes the men claimed upon her. Her adversaries then sought to condemn her for violating the law in which women were not allowed to study any branch of medicine.[5] Before the judges ruled on the trial, a crowd of women arrived at her trial to praise her successes as a physician and chastised their husbands for trying to execute Agnodice.[6] [5][7] After a short debate, Agnodice was acquitted from her charges and the Athenian law was changed to allow women to be treated by female physicians in Athens.[5][1]

en.wikipedia.org...


Queen Zubaida


Zubaida bint Jafar Al-Mansour was born in 170H (786 AD) during the time of the Abbasid Empire, an empire that lasted about 508 years and stretched from the Atlantic Ocean to China.



Zubaida was a very devout Muslim and never missed a prayer. She hired 100 servant girls to constantly recite Quran throughout the palace so that wherever you were, the versus of the Quran were echoed around you. She also made Hajj many times, often making the 900 mile trip from Baghdad to Mecca on foot. During one of her pilgrimages, she noticed that there was a water problem in Mecca. Many Muslims performing Hajj could not afford drinking water in areas in Mecca, near Mount Arafat, Mina and Muzdalefa. Zubaida was so distressed by seeing this that she brought forth the best engineers to build a canal that provided free water throughout all areas of Mecca. The water was brought from over the mountains for many miles and from the ground using tunnels, pits, channels, and all other methods. She was very involved in the whole process as she herself was educated in the ways of building and planning cities and infrastructure. The whole project took three years and cost the equivalent of billions of dollars in our time, which she personally paid from her own money.

Not only did she build this water system in Mecca, but also she created a path from Baghdad to Mecca to make it easier to travel to Hajj. There was a path that existed but it was always fading away because of desert sand and weather conditions. So to solve this problem, Zubaida built up walls that provided shelter to the travelers from the blowing sand and she also built masjids and hostels along the way.

mosaicofmuslimwomen.wordpress.com...


Queen Sonduk


Her father was the king of the Silla kingdom, which had emerged in the south about 250 and 350 AD, and by the end of the 7th century would manage to unify the whole peninsula. Having no sons, he chose as his heir his daughter Sondok.



Sondok's reign was a violent one; rebellions and fighting in the neighboring kingdom of Paekche filled her days. Yet, in her fourteen years as queen of Korea, her wit was to her advantage. She kept the kingdom together and extended its ties to China, sending scholars to learn from that august kingdom. Like China's Empress Wu Zetian, she was drawn to Buddhism and presided over the completion of Buddhist temples. She built the "Tower of the Moon and Stars," considered the first observatory in the Far East. The tower still stands in the old Silla capital city of Kyongju, South Korea.

www.womeninworldhistory.com...




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