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CDC mobilizing: Dallas Hospital confirms First Positive Ebola Case in the US

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posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 12:27 PM
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The NBC cameraman told doctors he is uncertain how he contracted Ebola.

Well then... I guess it's a little easier to contract it than the CDC has been leading us to believe...
edit on 6-10-2014 by CaPpedDoG because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 12:38 PM
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Here is one big question we will have to answer as it relates to Mr. Duncan's care and treatment...why was he not afforded the same options as Americans flown back here?

Why was he not given a blood tranfusion from a survivor or the experimental drug provided to Rick Sacra?

Details on the treatment given to Dr. Rick Sacra during his Ebola illness:


A medical missionary recovering from Ebola infection in Nebraska was given an experimental drug made by a Canadian company, his doctors said Monday. They’d already said that Dr. Rick Sacra got transfusions of serum from recovered Ebola patient Dr. Kent Brantly. They also had revealed that he got a weeklong treatment course of an experimental drug but had not said what drug it was.

"Although the FDA just authorized Tekmira to provide TKM-Ebola for treatment under expanded access protocols to patients with the Ebola virus, there's still a very short supply,” said Dr. Phil Smith, medical director of the Biocontainment Unit at The Nebraska Medical Center. Smith and his colleague Dr. Angela Hewlett said there's no way to tell what has led to Sacra’s recovery. He also got what’s called supportive care, which includes replacing fluids and important minerals lost to the vomiting and diarrhea caused by Ebola infection. "We don't know if it was Dr. Sacra's own immune system, the supportive therapy we provided, the blood transfusion from Dr. Brantly, TKM-Ebola or a combination off all these factors that helped Dr. Sacra recover,” Hewlett said. “What's important is that we pool all of our treatment resources and continue to study what is most effective in treating the virus."



Source

If Mr. Duncan did receive either of these options, it has not been confirmed by the hospital.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: DancedWithWolves

I agree with you.

I'm just keeping tract of how many times information gets changed in the media. Like I said before, "News always changes." The new article was only about an hour old before I linked it. They obviously didn't update their information before circulation. This trend of media not re-vetting information before circulation is ridicules. It is also why last night I thought both daughters and their families were quarantined.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: CaPpedDoG


Although Mukpo isn't sure how he was infected, he told his father that it's possible he was exposed when he was spray washing a car in which someone had died to disinfect it. That can expose people to Ebola, if blood or other fluids splash up and get into a person's eyes, Britigan said.


Source

Flashbacks to powerwashing vomit off the sidewalk in front of the apartment where Mr. Duncan stayed, anyone?



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: 2gd2btru

In this dailymail article it shows Ms. Troh at Church, correct? While in quarantine? Or is that an old picture? Curious. Very curious.

Not sure why you would bring family in when you can't really touch or communicate. If he does pass I hope they are kept far from the body.

I feel like I sound crass and cold but ... why would you want any family witnessing what the end is like for someone with that virus?



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 12:47 PM
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originally posted by: DancedWithWolves
a reply to: CaPpedDoG


Although Mukpo isn't sure how he was infected, he told his father that it's possible he was exposed when he was spray washing a car in which someone had died to disinfect it. That can expose people to Ebola, if blood or other fluids splash up and get into a person's eyes, Britigan said.


Source

Flashbacks to powerwashing vomit off the sidewalk in front of the apartment where Mr. Duncan stayed, anyone?



........... oh brother.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 01:13 PM
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Ebola in Spain: Nurse 'infected in Madrid'



A Spanish nurse who treated an Ebola victim in Madrid is thought to be the first person to have contracted the virus outside Africa, health officials say.

The nurse tested positive for Ebola in initial tests and doctors are awaiting final results, according to reports.

She was part of the team that treated Spanish priest Manuel Garcia Viejo, who died of Ebola on 25 September.

The nurse was admitted to hospital on Monday morning with a high fever, Spanish newspaper El Pais said.

Doctors isolated the emergency treatment room, the report said.


Well, at least they isolated her and didn't send her home with antibiotics. I wonder how long she'd been symptomatic, how she got to the hospital, etc.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 01:41 PM
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Reports are now showing that Duncan's family has consented to him receiving an experimental drug, Brincidofovir

Dallas Ebola Patient Treated with Experimental Drug



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: ValentineWiggin

I think that is an old photo of her in church. As someone who has worked as a church hostess to help with family illnesses/funerals we do what we can to serve the family's needs in times of hardship. I'm sure their family church will be available for whatever the incoming family is in need of, and aid them as they move to let go of a loved one together. Most family members come to comfort those who will be left behind. It isn't as much about witnessing the end as it is about helping to pick up the pieces when the end comes.



edit on 6-10-2014 by 2gd2btru because: grammar



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 01:48 PM
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Did someone say India, everything is moving really fast with potential or suspected cases popping up.
Ebola Outbreak: India Monitoring Possible New Ebola Victim From Japan

Yuko was planning to tour Manipur, but her trip was cut short when she began to exhibit symptoms of a potential Ebola infection. After tests for more common illnesses came up negative at Imphal’s hospital, doctors sent blood samples to India’s National Institute of Virology to be tested for Ebola, The Hindu reported.
If she's found to be positive for Ebola, Indian health officials may decide to have her moved to the Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, because it has an isolation ward, which Imphal’s J.N. Institute of Medical Sciences, where she's currently being held, does not, according to India’s Z News service. Z News added that Indian officials may decide to screen visitors to Manipur for the Ebola virus infection.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: shellyhk

stable condition Monday

seems he is now stable.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 02:18 PM
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originally posted by: CaPpedDoG
The NBC cameraman told doctors he is uncertain how he contracted Ebola.

Well then... I guess it's a little easier to contract it than the CDC has been leading us to believe...


i know how he contracted ebola....
he went to africa



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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i wonder why anyone would even want to go to that region right now(or ever)...

i guess i can kind of understand if you word for the WHO or doctors without borders...the red cross. something like that.
i get that some people want to become doctors. they want to help people. they want to lend their medical skills to people who need it. i get it and i have huge amounts of respect for them because i dont feel that way and wouldnt do what they do.

IF i became a doctor it would be to get paid first and foremost. healing people would be a distant second. sounds shallow but its the truth.

however, a freelance camera operator? what the hell was he thinking?
i wonder what could possible entice him to go to the danger zone....



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: CardiffGiant

Like many journalists, he believed he could make a difference by shining a light (and a camera) at injustices and problems in our world. I am grateful there are people like him willing to do this, otherwise we would truly be the blind leading the blind.


Mukpo is a devout, converted Buddhist from Rhode Island, and has a passion for Liberian culture, friends say. Philip Marcelo, a Boston-based Associated Press reporter, met him last year while on assignment in Liberia for The Providence Journal. Marcelo says Mukpo was a researcher for the Sustainable Development Institute, a Liberia-based nonprofit shining light on concerns of workers in mining camps outside Monrovia.

Mukpo had also spent two months in 2011 working with a Non-Governmental Organization in Liberia providing AIDS prevention services, said friend Adam Hutton. The two were also roommates in Brooklyn, N.Y., while Mukpo was in graduate school at Columbia University studying international and public affairs. “He cares very deeply about injustice in the world, he saw a lot of that in Liberia," Hutton told NBC News. "I think he was motivated to do something about it.”



Source

No journalist does this job for the money because most are paid deplorably, in proportion to the risks they take to keep the world informed, as much as is possible. No three-pointer pay for this gig.


edit on 6-10-2014 by DancedWithWolves because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: DancedWithWolves


Like many jounalists, he believed he could make a difference by shining a light (and a camera) at injustices and problems in our world.



fair enough. makes sense i guess.
respect[/ali g] then because i wouldnt be going anywhere near there to shine any kind of light



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: DancedWithWolves

Interesting, like you said if Mr. Duncan has taken any type of testing serum it will not be told.

I was having coffee with a friend of mine that also a traveling nurse, she just came from North Dakota, we were discussing the ebola virus and the Liberian man that got infected and the spread.

Beside the obvious that we have discussed in detail here, we also talk about how the countries that are suffering from ebola full blown epidemic will be watching very closely to the developments of Mr. Duncan to see if he recuperates fully.

The reason we speculated that, is, if he is to recovery fully it will be an influx of people from those areas of the world trying to get in the US for a cure.

I can not blame them, I rather take the trip looking for an opportunity to survive than dying doing nothing.

So I got the feeling that Mr. Duncan treatment will be kept secret.

Now, I could be wrong.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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originally posted by: marg6043


I can not blame them, I rather take the trip looking for an opportunity to survive than dying doing nothing.



i cant blame them either. i would do the same thing if i were in that situation.
that said....lock them out
we dont need to import ebola infected people to possibly infect others while trying to get medical care they are not going to pay for



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: DancedWithWolves
Here is one big question we will have to answer as it relates to Mr. Duncan's care and treatment...why was he not afforded the same options as Americans flown back here?

Why was he not given a blood tranfusion from a survivor or the experimental drug provided to Rick Sacra?


Maybe blood types didn't match?



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: CardiffGiant

I agree, the government should be doing what is been done in Russia, quarantine anybody that comes from an ebola hot spot regardless, that will ensure that if they are sick they can receive proper treatment.

I found this on the news about the possible treatment for Mr. Duncan,


Drug made by Durham's Chimerix given to Texas Ebola patient

An experimental drug made by Durham drug developer Chimerix is being administered in Texas to a Liberian man infected with the Ebola virus.

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas on Monday confirmed that Thomas Duncan is receiving the treatment.

“Mr. Duncan remains in critical condition. His condition is stable,” the hospital’s statement said. “He is now receiving an investigational medication, brincidofovir, for Ebola Virus Disease.”

Brincidofovir is made by Chimerix and is being tested for a variety of potent viruses.


Read more here: www.charlotteobserver.com...=cpy

Is this is true, he is in stable conditions and the news are good.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: CardiffGiant

originally posted by: marg6043


I can not blame them, I rather take the trip looking for an opportunity to survive than dying doing nothing.



i cant blame them either. i would do the same thing if i were in that situation.
that said....lock them out
we dont need to import ebola infected people to possibly infect others while trying to get medical care they are not going to pay for


Agree Agree Agree!!!
Especially since they apparently are not going to be confined to the Level 4 Bio-safety environments, like this 2003 article speaks of. Interesting to note it cites International Travelers in the very first sentence. And if you read on down, sounds like the DoD needs to pony up with the resources and house all the dangerously infected patients instead of letting public hospitals take on this risk to humanity!

Source

Abstract


The greatest threats to America's public health include accidental importation of deadly diseases by international travelers and the release of biologic weapons by our adversaries. The greatest failure is unpreparedness because international travel and dispersion of biologic agents by our enemies are inevitable. An effective medical defense program is the recommended deterrent against these threats. The United States has a federal response plan in place that includes patient care and patient transport by using the highest level of biologic containment: BSL-4. The DoD has the capability to provide intensive care for victims infected with highly infectious yet unknown biologic agents in an environment that protects the caregiver while allowing scientists to study the characteristics of these new agents and assess the effectiveness of treatment. Army critical care nurses are vital in the biologic medical defense against unidentified infectious diseases, accidental occupational exposures, or intentional dispersion of weaponized biologic agents. Research that carefully advances healthcare using BSL-4 technology addresses the challenges of the human element of BSL-4 containment patient care, and BSL-4 patient transport enhances our nation's ability to address the emerging biologic threats we confront in the future.



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