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CDC mobilizing: Dallas Hospital confirms First Positive Ebola Case in the US

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posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: Gothar

I will definitely agree that the most dangerous approach to take is an arrogant one. Nature doesn't care what we think, it just does what it does. Getting a handle on this now should be paramount.

Honestly though I think people overestimate our readiness as a society to handle something like this. Arrogance and bravado have no place when dealing with something like Ebola. If the nephew of the first victim had to call the CDC, what's going to happen if there are a dozen cases, or a few dozen?

What happens when someone panics and goes on the run? Lord knows it's not everyone's dream in life to be locked into a room for weeks surrounded by people in HAZMAT suits and plastic sheeting.




posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:24 AM
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From Pigs to Monkeys, Ebola goes airbourne:
2010


When news broke that the Ebola virus had resurfaced in Uganda, investigators in Canada were making headlines of their own with research indicating the deadly virus may spread between species, through the air.

The team, comprised of researchers from the National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease, the University of Manitoba, and the Public Health Agency of Canada, observed transmission of Ebola from pigs to monkeys. They first inoculated a number of piglets with the Zaire strain of the Ebola virus. Ebola-Zaire is the deadliest strain, with mortality rates up to 90 percent. The piglets were then placed in a room with four cynomolgus macaques, a species of monkey commonly used in laboratories. The animals were separated by wire cages to prevent direct contact between the species.

Within a few days, the inoculated piglets showed clinical signs of infection indicative of Ebola infection. In pigs, Ebola generally causes respiratory illness and increased temperature. Nine days after infection, all piglets appeared to have recovered from the disease.

Within eight days of exposure, two of the four monkeys showed signs of Ebola infection. Four days later, the remaining two monkeys were sick too. It is possible that the first two monkeys infected the other two, but transmission between non-human primates has never before been observed in a lab setting.

While the study provided evidence that transmission of Ebola between species is possible, researchers still cannot say for certain how that transmission actually occurred. There are three likely candidates for the route of transmission: airborne, droplet, or fomites.

Airborne and droplet transmission


healthmap.org...



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: windowpane

That and this is the perfect killer of the infidels...



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:27 AM
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a reply to: antar




Within eight days of exposure, two of the four monkeys showed signs of Ebola infection. Four days later, the remaining two monkeys were sick too. It is possible that the first two monkeys infected the other two, but transmission between non-human primates has never before been observed in a lab setting.


Might be worth looking into Ebola Reston, which was the first outbreak of Ebola in the United States in 1989. Airborne transmission was suspected back then as the virus infected hundreds of monkeys separated from each other by cages at a research lab in Reston Virginia. The Reston strain wasn't deadly to people though; a fortuitous roll of the genetic dice.



RESTON, Va. (AP) — It had all the makings of a public-health horror story: an outbreak of a wildly deadly virus on the doorstep of the nation's capital, with dozens of lab monkeys dead, multiple people testing positive, and no precedent in this country on how to contain it.

Americans' introduction to the Ebola virus came 25 years ago in an office park near Washington Dulles International Airport, a covert crisis that captivated the public only years later when it formed the basis of a bestselling book.

Initially thought to be the same hyper-deadly strain as the current Ebola outbreak that has killed hundreds in Africa, the previously unknown Reston variant turned out to be nonlethal to humans. But the story of what might have been illustrates how far U.S. scientists have come in their understanding of a virus whose very name strikes fear, even in a country where no one has fatally contracted it.





In the fall of 1989, dozens of macaques imported from the Philippines suddenly died at Hazelton Research Products' primate quarantine unit in Reston, where animals were kept and later sold for lab testing. Company officials contacted the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, Md. — Jaax's unit — concerned they might be dealing with an outbreak of hemorrhagic fever among the monkeys.

Initial testing revealed something much worse: Ebola, specifically the Zaire strain, which had a 90 percent fatality rate in humans. Four workers at the quarantine facility tested positive for exposure to the virus.

Amazingly, they never even got sick.

Researchers eventually realized they were dealing with a different strain, one now known as Ebola-Reston. Though its appearance under a microscope is similar to the Zaire strain, Ebola-Reston is the only one of the five forms of Ebola not harmful to humans.


www.usatoday.com...
edit on 2-10-2014 by windowpane because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-10-2014 by windowpane because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:27 AM
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I can't help but wonder the what ifs. In the areas of Africa where this has hit hard, people have been noted to be afraid of Dr's and avoid them at all costs because Ebola has a history of spreading from the Dr.s and medical areas.

We have not had that worry here except for staph infections/MRSA. If this does spread, we will have people flooding hospitals with every runny nose and fever exposing people whose immune system is already taxed with the flu and might not have Ebola.

We are going to have quite a mess.

Do they expect those who have been exposed to not go to work for 21 days? Do they expect kids not to go to school? (though I will pull mine and homeschool if it comes here).

This will be interesting.
edit on OctThu, 02 Oct 2014 10:30:31 -050031.ndam313114p by mrsdudara because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:32 AM
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originally posted by: mrsdudara
I can't help but wonder the what ifs. In the areas of Africa where this has hit hard, people have been noted to be afraid of Dr's and avoid them at all costs because Ebola has a history of spreading from the Dr.s and medical areas.

We have not had that worry here except for staph infections/MRSA. If this does spread, we will have people flooding hospitals with every runny nose and fever exposing people whose immune system is already taxed with the flu and might not have Ebola.

We are going to have quite a mess.

Do they expect those who have been exposed to not go to work for 21 days? Do they expect kids not to go to school? (though I will pull mine and homeschool if it comes here).

This will be interesting.


These are all questions we're going to have to answer. How does society function properly if we have any significant spread of a virus like Ebola?

Will things start to break down as panic and fear spread? Will we pull together and work to contain the virus?

My guess is you will see some panic, some breakdown, but mostly people working together.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:37 AM
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originally posted by: nugget1





took her by taxi to a hospital with Mr. Duncan’s help on Sept. 15




she died hours later, around 3 a.m.

So, Mr. Duncan knew he had been exposed and chose to join his GF in America......
I don't think I would have made that choice.

We're supposed to have faith that the CDC is well prepared and on top of this, but it took 2 days to decontaminate the ambulance that was used?

Asking people to stay home because they have been exposed isn't very comforting.
We're told this disease keeps mutating, so how long before it mutates to an airborne variety? And, will they even tell us if it does?

I think Big Pharma, the healthcare industry and a lot of stockholders will be buying new yachts soon......


And think of the people PZ was in close contact with in Liberia, he now rests in a US hospital knowing all of the people he has infected including his time traveling here.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:40 AM
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My guess this is the chance to get rid of the bottom feeders, the people who take their children into ER's across America and allow them to lick the floors, wallow around on the floors without shoes and leaf through magazines and books while waiting to be seen... and then off to McDonalds playhouses...



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: windowpane

Panic will prove to be a far more effective killer than Ebola, in a worst case outbreak.

imo

Imagine being trapped in a quarantined sector of a city, being told to stay inside and wait for news and information. Military forces being deployed, no way out...

I could go on, but you've already seen that movie, and know how it goes...

Pray it never gets to that point for real. It should not happen. Not with this virus.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:46 AM
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CNN reporting that Duncan's girlfriend claims that CDC has not provided any instructions or aided in decontaminating the apartment where Duncan was staying.







posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:47 AM
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This is interesting:
www.cnn.com...


I wonder how many of us are willing to do the same?



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: kosmicjack
CNN reporting that Duncan's girlfriend claims that CDC has not provided any instructions or aided in decontaminating the apartment where Duncan was staying.












Isn't that terrible? She is confused as to what to do with the pillows and sheets that are still on the bed. He was sweating a lot.

The Red Cross gave her a sandwich last night but she hasn't had anything to eat today and can't leave her apartment. That's terrible!! That poor woman!

Shame on the CDC, Red Cross and other organizations who are supposed to be helping her.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: CardiffGiant

I agree with everything you said. It's good common sense but I"m afraid a portion of our society is sorely lacking in that department.

The nurse/gf continued working while taking care of a suspected Ebola patient, she knew better/did it anyway. Did she inform her boss of the situation, was she so naive she didn't think it was worth a mention or was she trying to keep it a secret/hope for the best? I suspect the latter.

In theory your post makes total sense but in practice people will lose it for whatever stupid, self serving reason. Educated people aren't exempt. She's a nurse,of all people she should've known proper procedure or made an educated guess. Yet she allowed children/family to come in contact with this man and continued working. She chose to throw caution/common sense right out the WINDOW. (Sorry for the caps ATS doesn't like the word.)

Despite her inside knowledge/education she dropped the ball. Can we honestly expect other Americans will do any better? Look how many have been exposed by 1 mishandled patient. Not a luxury we can afford.

Leaving people to their own devices hasn't worked so well in west Africa. Ebola or lack of education isn't the problem, reining in/calming scared/panicked people is. West Africa has failed in that regard and just because we are medically superior doesn't mean our population as a whole will do the right thing.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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originally posted by: texasgirl

Shame on the CDC, Red Cross and other organizations who are supposed to be helping her.


It's a joke - and yet we are supposed to trust them!?

Doctor dons Ebola protection suit to protest CDC

edit on 10/2/2014 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:00 AM
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originally posted by: kosmicjack

originally posted by: texasgirl



Shame on the CDC, Red Cross and other organizations who are supposed to be helping her.




It's a joke - and yet we are supposed to trust them!?



Doctor dons Ebola protection suit to protest CDC




Thanks for that link. Very disturbing.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:00 AM
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a reply to: antar

I am happy to see you and other members inserting common sense prevention into these threads. There are many things available to keep us relatively germ free when we are out and about, and for all those things that we bring home.

Members may want to look into easily gotten antivirals also. A simple google search, then pick your prevention. I am stocking up on olive leaf extract, not because of ebola but the flu season is now upon us.

The Pharma company that has shares skyrocketing is BioCryst and their antiviral wonder drug. I say we all beat them to the punch and create our own antiviral protection. I alternate olive leaf extract, oil of oregano, with turmeric and lots of garlic. If folks double up on antivirals, taking a probiotic every day would be wise.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

She is a health care worker is she not?

She brought a man she knew was in direct contact with Ebola into her house did she not?

She kept a sick patient in her home and treated him while also treating other patients outside her home did she not?

Now we are hearing that they had to call the CDC because at their first visit the patient history "wasn't shared between the entire team", the CDC had to ORDER them to remain away from the general public, and the CDC isn't helping them sanitize their home.

This is going to boil down to the US owing these people something. Lawsuits are in the works as we speak I can guarantee. What should have been prosecution for the two of them for knowingly putting the nation at risk will end up being the best thing that every happened to them........... if they survive.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: 200Plus

You'll get no arguments from me.

I think he had to have known he had exposure and he came here to get help. They have been in a relationship for 15 years and he has never been here - until NOW - just days after he helped physically carry a woman dying of Ebola to the hospital. She died. The other guy helping died.

So, yeah, they own it as far as I'm concerned - BUT...

Pointing fingers should come after containment FFS!
edit on 10/2/2014 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: 200Plus

just heard on the tv news that they are now watching 80 people due to the case in dallas.....flu season is coming....people have to work to pay bills...human nature......mistakes...self preservation....denial......not going to be good....how many of these 80 will show symptoms.....




posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

I agree.

The whole CDC "isn't helping" thing could have been handled by placing the entire family in a clean facility for 21 days. However that would have opened up a whole other can of worms I would imagine.

Damned if you do and damned if you don't kind of situation.

Maybe they could drop off a couple cases of water and some MRE's with a 5-gallon bucket of STB on the sly. Question is can they do that for the next patient and the one after that and the one after that...........



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