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CDC mobilizing: Dallas Hospital confirms First Positive Ebola Case in the US

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posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:07 AM
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originally posted by: marg6043

They see their nation as a extension of the US.





yeah well, theyre wrong.
lock it down




posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: Doodle19815

I was happy to see someone addressing prevention, and in my mind was not off topic. Empowering ourselves is more important than discussing the stupidity of all those government experts.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: SunnyRunner360
Here is my concern, the man went to the hospital initially because he was exhibiting symptoms and had just come from an infected region. For whatever reason, he is misdiagnosed with something bacterial, not viral, and sent home. Now this man has the assurance that he doesn’t have ebola, so though he may feel under the weather he isn’t going to take extra precaution not to come into contact with others. Even if he didn’t feel well enough to venture into public, any of the family members who became symptomatic prior to proper diagnosis would also have had the same assurance that the symptoms they may be feeling are not cause for great enough concern to limit contact with others. This is a greater concern than even the original patient. We have this idea that our nation is safer because we have better medical care, but we also suffer this delusion that it can’t happen here so we are not being as efficient of observers as we should.


He probably did not have medical insurance. If he could not pay for tests, they probably gave him antibiotics and sent him home. The area seems to have a large Liberian population, so health care workers might not be in the habit of asking if someone was recently in Africa. Accents might be common there.

I would say they should fire whoever sent him home from the hospital the first time, but I think they have bigger issues right now, as the person who misdiagnosed him must be on their exposed-potential-infected list. And - how many other patients did that health care worker treat in the last few days?

I am sure (hope?) that from now on health care workers will be asking about travel history. I was at the doctor a few weeks ago with a fever (just an infection), and was asked if I have traveled recently. So, I am sure this is proper procedure.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:11 AM
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Just heard on news media that they know of 125 people so far that was exposed. Exponential growth potential.
edit on 1-10-2014 by MOMof3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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Officials: Second person being monitored for Ebola


DALLAS — Health officials are closely monitoring a possible second Ebola patient who had close contact with the first person to be diagnosed in the U.S., the director of Dallas County's health department said Wednesday.


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posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:22 AM
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At least they are checking people for fevers before they allow them on planes. It's a good thing there are no medicines like Tylenol or Ibuprofen that mask fevers. /end sarcasm



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:23 AM
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The fact is: no one can say conclusively how it's spreading...obviously.
Americans are human - just like the rest of the world and Ebola does not discriminate!
No matter how superior your medical facilities are, no matter how clean your country is, you're not exempt.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: Doodle19815


Thank you for the preventative advice. Though I did read that boosting your immune system may in fact make this particular virus worse.



When a person becomes infected with Ebola, the virus depletes the body's immune cells, which defend against infection, said Derek Gatherer, a bioinformatics researcher at Lancaster University in the United Kingdom, who studies viral genetics and evolution. In particular, the Ebola virus depletes immune cells called CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes, which are crucial to the function of the immune system, Gatherer said. [5 Things You Should Know About Ebola] But if a person's immune system can stand up to this initial attack — meaning their immune cells are not as depleted in the first stages of infection — then studies suggest they are more likely to survive the disease.

www.foxnews.com...



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:27 AM
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CNN just announced that Patient Z traveled from Liberia to Brussels before arriving in DFW.
www.cnn.com via Legal View (TV)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: Witness2008

Thank you for that. I can't remember what the immune storm is called off the top of my head... Something else to research I guess.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:35 AM
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I remembered seeing this a couple of months ago.

From August 1, 2014

Airline travelers are not being screened for Ebola


World and U.S. health officials urge airline crews to isolate passengers who show symptoms of the Ebola virus if they have recently traveled to West African countries suffering an outbreak of the deadly disease.

But the World Health Organization isn't recommending screening airline passengers leaving the region of Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone. Screening is costly and detected few cases after an outbreak in 2003 of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, that began in China.

Sick people are urged not to travel. Because Ebola's incubation period is two to 21 days and early symptoms aren't specific, using thermal scanners to detect fevers is costly, unlikely to detect anyone infected with Ebola "and is not encouraged," according to the WHO.


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posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:36 AM
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originally posted by: MOMof3
Just heard on news media that they know of 125 people so far that was exposed. Exponential growth potential.


And that's just the ones they know of.

The good news (if there is any) is that if he is patient zero and if they have managed to trace every contact he had, they can now monitor them and if any show symptoms as well, they can isolate them at once so they don't infect others.

Trouble is, with an incubation period that can be as short as two days, they are already past the window of opportunity for tracking and isolating all possible infected contacts before they also can pass on the infection. It's been about a week since he first showed symptoms and became infectious; it was then about four days before he was admitted to hospital and placed in isolation.

So, the worst-case scenario is as you said: exponential growth potential. The best-case is they found everyone, they are monitoring them, and will isolate any who might show symptoms.
edit on 1/10/14 by JustMike because: fixed the last sentence so it made some sense.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: Doodle19815

Found it - cytokine storm -
en.m.wikipedia.org...

So in essence, it is our immune system that kills us. That may be why youth and elderly do better. Not sure.
That isn't to say I won't be eating my oranges. I am just trying to learn as much as possible without taking a microbiology class.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: Doodle19815

Cytokine storm. I too read on ATS somewhere that boosting your immune system could make it more difficult to deal with this, but I can't remember which thread it was now...will try and find it for you.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:38 AM
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From my post on september 4th:




Make note of the size of the expected outbreak in the US according to the graphic above.


It's only a matter of time, some researchers are warning, before isolated cases of Ebola start turning up in developed nations, as well as hitherto-unaffected African countries.


This is something ATSers have been saying for weeks, even months, now and it is only recently being reported as being said in the scientific community.


The probability of seeing at least one imported case of Ebola in the U.S. is as high as 18 percent by late September, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. That's compared to less than 5 percent right now.


As time goes by, it becomes more of a certainly; when, not if.

And its here now, no longer when...

...


There's a 25 to 28 percent chance that an Ebola case will turn up in the U.K. by late September. Belgium, France and Germany will have lower risk. "But it's not negligible," Vespignani says. "Sooner or later, they will arrive."


The closer to Africa the more likely it is to show, and sooner.


The researchers calculated the impact of severe restrictions on flights from Ebola-affected regions. An 80 percent reduction in air travelers would do no more than delay the impact of Ebola by a few weeks. (A 100 percent choke-off of air travel is considered impossible.)


Impossible by choice.


"Unless you can completely shut down the transportation systems, these kinds of efforts will, at best, buy you a little time," Longini says. "And they can be quite counterproductive because you're interrupting the flow of help, goods and services. It can make the epidemic worse in the country that's being quarantined."


All commercial traffic should have been halted weeks ago and only allow aid/food/supply flights, but that was deemed too damaging economically.

A Few Ebola Cases Likely In U.S., Air Traffic Analysis Shows



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: Doodle19815
Young people would do worse. Cytokine storms hit hardest in those whose immune systems work best.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: caitlinfae
Yes, I think it was SofiCrow who posted about that. And it's true: you don't want to boost your immune system to try and protect yourself in this case. The virus could actually hit you harder.

It's something like the 1918-20 Spanish Flue pandemic. It hit young, fit people very hard. Not the same disease, obviously, but the same principal. Cytokine storms were the killer factor in many cases, apparently. Not all, but many.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:42 AM
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www.cdc.gov...
Maybe this solves the puzzle of the confirmation or not. Like it would even matter



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical
I remember reading this post. The CDC has banged the drums poorly, IMHO. Reuters and CNN are reporting that Patient Z traveled from Liberia to Brussels. The CDC hasn't released the patient's name or flight numbers to any airlines. That alone makes many of us go, Hmmmmmm.




posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 11:45 AM
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a reply to: K_OS

Thing is, if you have an 11-19 hour flight you may not show symptoms at the gate but can be in full blown fever within hours. Everyone who has come into contact with Patient Zero was and is a continued risk no matter how they down play this or people chose to be in denial of their exposure.

Came on to remind members from the discussion from yesterday what I had sensed about this guy hugging children, family and friends... now we have reports of someone in his circle being checked out for the virus...

NOW, WTH? So he has only been in the States for 10 days and his contactee's are already beginning to show symptoms? This tells me that he was far more sick upon his International Travels than he let on so that he could get back into the states for treatment rather than being shut out in a location less capable of handling his sickness.

If you are at the start of a fever you can take copious amounts of fever reducers, enough to drop your temp to a passable level. Face it, the TSA are not trained medical professionals.

So, back to the children who have been exposed, they went on to school, church, shopping, entertainment, transportation to name but a few of the public exposures.

*Bumping the thread, and where is Soficrow?*




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