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CDC mobilizing: Dallas Hospital confirms First Positive Ebola Case in the US

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posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: marg6043

Look lady you are naive! Sorry but you are. Those hospitals are few and far between. And they are in major cities like Atlanta. Even hospitals such as Emory U. Can only handle maybe a dozen or so truly sick people with rare infectious disease. They don't have any more special facility than my hospital. The only difference is we have 2 reverse isolation negative pressure rooms where as a place like Emory might have a dozen. Also what you are forgetting is many if these patients are ICU critical patients. There are only a certain number of those beds set aside for infectious disease as well. It's not the training that matters in a situation like this IT'S THE RESOURCES!!!!
You're average sick person isn't likely to check into an Emory U. ER. They are going to go down to that community hospital or worse urgent care down the street.




posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: Shana91aus

That might be a good idea. I heard someone ask how we are supposed to keep Ebola out of the country when the best security in the world can't keep someone from running all the way across the lawn and into the White House?



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:38 AM
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PEOPLE NOTHING TO WORRY ABOUT, EBOLA IS HARD TO CONTRACT...

Which is obvious when some of the leading Ebola doctors/researchers have caught the disease. Doctors who know every precautionary measure to take.... You know, if the leading doctors are getting sick, average joes like you and me have NOTHING to worry about....(Rolls Eyes)
edit on 1-10-2014 by jhn7537 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:42 AM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


originally posted by: loam
"Strict isolation" at the hospital. What about before?

Exactly. He didn't just magically pop into Dallas from nowhere. And last I saw, Ebola can live on surfaces up to 60 days. All I can say to this is .... crap, it's here.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.


No... 5 days at the most. You are thinking about how long it lasts in semen after infection which is 61 days.


Remember, electromagnetic waves, uv light, and temperature completely screw up viruses as they do not have an effective wall or membrane.

www.reddit.com...



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: jhn7537

Most doctors in the average hospital maybe spends a few minutes interacting with a sick patient. And you should see them try to correctly don isolation equipment! Hell most will take their stethoscope into an isolation room
And simply wipe it off instead of using the el cheapo one in the room meant for isolation. I just shake my head..... Americans have no idea what goes on in the average hospital... It's like those restaurant shows where cooks are dropping meat and putting back on the plate.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:44 AM
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What seems to be lost is the impact that this would have on W. Africa. It would kill their economy. It may be easy to think that this is a minor problem considering the potential, but if their economy crumbles the area could devolve into chaos. People would be fleeing in great numbers and thus spreading the disease. It is not as simple as saying "ban all flights to and from" this area. a reply to: CardiffGiant



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: marg6043
a reply to: Dryad2

I agree and that is why I am angry about the whole situation, is like our government is inviting the ebola pandemic into our soil.

The greed of the big pharma have no boundaries, the only way they can make profits is if we got a pandemic in the US.


Oh, I also heard this morning that stocks for these companies working on a cure are up, way to go speculators.

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp. shares rallied in the extended session Tuesday after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first case of the Ebola virus on U.S. soil.
Market Watch
Tekmira TKMR, +17.79% TKM, +24.01% jumped 27% to $26.82 on very heavy volume following a report of the first known U.S. case of the Ebola virus.




posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:46 AM
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One reason healthcare professionals are getting sick is because they simply do not have the protective equipment to take precautionary measures. They are overwhelmed and tired, which makes it easier to make mistakes. Its a perfect storm. a reply to: jhn7537



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:48 AM
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Scheduling a press conference today…


Accompanied by state health director David L. Lakey, Gov. Rick Perry will hold a press conference to address the diagnosis at noon from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

Second possible case in Dallas



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: GreenMtnBoys

Been naïve? that is what I am saying, only "CERTAIN" hospitals are equipped for infectious diseases.

I think you are getting too work out with the ebola case in Texas, do not let the "mass hysteria" get to you too much

I find more dangerous the mass hysteria than the ebola infected, at least the infected are very sick to do anything stupid out there but trying to get to the nearest hospital to get treatment.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: marg6043

I'd rate the various scenarios I mentioned as quite possible. That's just my opinion, we all have one and you and I apparently differ. But that's okay.


However, just like yourself, the last thing I want is mass hysteria. That helps no-one. All I have done is point out some concepts or scenarios that the authorities are apparently not openly discussing. At least, not with our MSM people. Okay, I can understand why, but just because they don't mention something doesn't mean they are not considering it.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:55 AM
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originally posted by: SunnyRunner360
What seems to be lost is the impact that this would have on W. Africa. It would kill their economy. It may be easy to think that this is a minor problem considering the potential, but if their economy crumbles the area could devolve into chaos. People would be fleeing in great numbers and thus spreading the disease. It is not as simple as saying "ban all flights to and from" this area. a reply to: CardiffGiant



i dont really care about the impact to their limited economy. i know people are worried about what we import from them but i think losing those imports would be worth it. i know they export diamonds and ash but in the grand scheme of things, they dont export all that much. at least not to the us.

as far as the area descending into chaos. yeah, that would probably happen...that sucks for them but those are the breaks[/curts blow]
like i said before i dont have all the answers as far as logistics go. as far as them traveling to other countries....well, other countries need to lock it down as well.
how does that happen exactly? i dont know

again, people figured out space travel. people figured out how to split the atom. people can build sky scrapers and bridges.
restricting travel to and from can be figured out. im positive about that



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: GreenMtnBoys

On that I agree, the ones that do the first assessments are the nurses in the ERs, they are the ones that spend the most with the sick, doctors just pup up to do mostly the prescriptions and decided if they should be admitted to the hospital for specialized care, where another doctor and more nurses will interact with the patient.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: JustMike

I am as worry and concern as anybody else, But all we can do is go day by day and keep an eye on the spread, is here that is not doubt about it, yes I am angry at our government because this could be avoided as long as we can.

But now we just need to deal with it.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Worth a try, i mean what else is there, i can't imagine protesting being a good idea at all they would probably just shoot and gas everyone!?
Who ever said that makes a good point! Alot don't think about human error, why even leave it up too chance, basically yeah things might get chaotic in The hot zone if air travel is restricted but by keeping it open we are risking a global pandemic and who only knows how many lives would be sacrificed just to keep one area of the world from going in to chaos, they can help stop this by sending in specially trained in this field military help, all countries - which im already aware a few are but alot more could be sent - it really is as easy as restricting air travel and really locking that place down in to a quarantine zone and saving as many lives in that area as they can, because if they don't then soon its going to be global and they wont be able to contain it that will be it.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: whatnext21

It is sad that people needs to get a reality check when it comes to how the callousness of our corporate power works, they don't give two rats arses about the safety of us the common people, all they care is about how much profits the infected with ebola will bring to their dirty pockets.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 10:01 AM
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The biggest concern to me is all the media coverage of how North America was "preparing" for ebola. Hospitals were getting training etc. Then, someone comes from an infected area displaying symptoms and they send him home? So much for that training.

Also, we have sent doctors and scientists and CDC/WHO workers, missionaries, volunteers and military to Africa to help with their outbreak. If we end up with issues in North America and have to bring them home.....I guess Africa is left to it's own devices. I hope they nip this in the bud very quickly.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: Shana91aus


Several children?? Which more than likely have attended school and been around other children since being in contact with him..

I missed that (yikes) part. Thanks for mentioning it.

Kids don't know from hygiene, they touch everything.



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 10:04 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr



SO, the R Naught factor has a beginning

R Naught



edit on 1-10-2014 by Blue_Jay33 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 10:06 AM
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originally posted by: fleabit

I think it's worthy of concern.


Agreed, but many of the reactions are beyond concern. Once symptomatic, how many folks would he come in contact with? Someone has a flu.. sweating.. coughing.. looks awful.. do you stay away? Most would. He may have in contact with a small # of folks.. but they'll have them pinned down.. and those THEY were in contact with pinned down in a hurry. I'm sure it's already done. All those folks are watched for 21 days.. done deal.

The only real scary bit in my mind is if someone panics and runs.. comes in contact with others, and they don't know who to track. That's when it could get messy. So I agree.. concern is needed. I'm concerned. Just not "omg the pestilence is upon us!" level of concern.


But if all it takes is a nose wipe and subsequent push of a shopping cart around Walmart, how does one "pin down" those who were exposed? "Done deal" seems foolishly simplistic to me.




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