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Harrier cockpit perspective.

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posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: Spacespider

It's a 3D head up display. It shows airspeed, heading, target location, shoot cues, etc. Everything the pilot needs to know is right in front of him so that he doesn't need to look down into the cockpit.




posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Spacespider

It's a 3D head up display. It shows airspeed, heading, target location, shoot cues, etc. Everything the pilot needs to know is right in front of him so that he doesn't need to look down into the cockpit.


Thats was not my question...

I know what it is for and why it is there...

But it´s HOW is it there..



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: Spacespider

How is the green there?



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: Spacespider
But it´s HOW is it there..


Magic.

Wikipedia has an overlong description of how it works en.wikipedia.org...

To topic. The Harriers cockpit is quite cluttered. I was looking at more modern aircraft e.g. Typhoon, which is much simpler. The glider I have flown in is simpler!

Regards
edit on 28/9/2014 by paraphi because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

I got to see a B-57 cockpit a few years ago. It was nuts to see the difference between then and now.



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 01:42 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: onehuman

The only aircraft that left handed people don't have to be ambidextrous to fly are larger aircraft, that require two pilots. All single seat aircraft have the throttle on the left side, and a right handed control stick.

Zaph, On the Mohawk the stick is handled with the left hand and the power levers are on the right. Most pilots have to be ambidextrous.



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: buddah6

That's about the only one that I've heard of that's set up like that then. Every other single pilot I've ever seen was throttle on left.



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

The Mohawk has side-by-side seating, and like most aircraft with such configuration, the throttle quadrant is located between the two seats. It's not really an exception to the rule, even if the Mohawk flew most often with a single qualified pilot in practice.



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: _Del_

That's why then. I couldn't remember if it was dual seat, or front back seating. It's been a long time since I've seen one.

That's actually the configuration I was talking about earlier, with the two pilot, center throttle.



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Well, the observer was not a rated pilot, so it is technically a single pilot a/c, I suppose. Most of the instrumentation is on the pilots side, but visible from the observer's seat. Both pilot and observer had a stick, and many observers got some bootleg time as both members of the crew typically thought it was a good idea to be able to get out of indian country before landing/punching out in case the pilot was incapacitated.



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: _Del_

I have yet to see a dual stick configuration that DIDN'T get some bootleg time in. Even letting the WSO learn how to fly refueling.



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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Kind of funny that this is a picture from wikimedia and not some Uncle.

Real picture



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: _Del_
a reply to: Zaphod58


edit on 28-9-2014 by buddah6 because: lobotimization



posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 03:54 PM
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a reply to: johngrissom

I prefer the pic you linked to.

However, the original pic was taken by a pilot. Maybe he was someones Uncle and shared the digitally manipulated image ...
I was impressed by the image not so much the header.






posted on Sep, 28 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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originally posted by: _Del_
a reply to: Zaphod58


edit on 28-9-2014 by buddah6 because: lobotimization



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: _Del_
a reply to: Zaphod58

Well, the observer was not a rated pilot, so it is technically a single pilot a/c, I suppose. Most of the instrumentation is on the pilots side, but visible from the observer's seat. Both pilot and observer had a stick, and many observers got some bootleg time as both members of the crew typically thought it was a good idea to be able to get out of indian country before landing/punching out in case the pilot was incapacitated.

Del, Only the trainer version has dual controls. The left side only has flight instrumentation, except the trainer. On operational aircraft the right side has no room for flight controls just sensor gear. This is all I feel comfortable in saying...I don't know if this gear is still classified so that's all for now. Truly ATS!
edit on 30-9-2014 by buddah6 because: lobotomized through superior pain meds.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 01:29 PM
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Without having any real flying experience whatsoever, it seems to me that the left hand is busier nowayadays anyway. As a start, modern fly by wire and "smart autopilots" lets aircraft stay level and stable without any pilot input whatsoever. Older aircraft often have the nasty habit of needing constant corrections, i.e. hands on stick.

So my amateur presumption would be that left handedness might have grown to be an advantage afterall.


originally posted by: paraphi
...

To topic. The Harriers cockpit is quite cluttered. I was looking at more modern aircraft e.g. Typhoon, which is much simpler. The glider I have flown in is simpler!

Regards

Well, the cockpit of a Typhoon is a lot larger (also to the left and right), so you naturally have more real estate to put stuff. Not to speak of the many things that now are mainly handled by the computers, they dont get their own controls anymore and are accessed via MFD sub-menus. Also, the equipment and capabilities of the Harrier grew, but not the availalbe space. So knobs, dials and displays necessarily get cluttered up, along with a certain "handyman" approach to ergonomics (if it fits, it sits!).
edit on 30/9/2014 by Lonestar24 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 02:58 PM
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originally posted by: onehuman
Okay stupid question time, but I am curious. Is it hard for left handed people to adapt to using the "joy stick" since the proper term escapes me at the moment. Even the curve of it looks like it is geared more for right handed people.

Cool picture btw. The flight deck looks so narrow from this point of view
Flying with either hand is quite easy. Just take about 10 hrs flying exp to switch hands



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:36 AM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei

originally posted by: onehuman
Okay stupid question time, but I am curious. Is it hard for left handed people to adapt to using the "joy stick" since the proper term escapes me at the moment. Even the curve of it looks like it is geared more for right handed people.

Cool picture btw. The flight deck looks so narrow from this point of view
Flying with either hand is quite easy. Just take about 10 hrs flying exp to switch hands

I flew the Mohawk from 1978 until 1992 and it always felt a little odd with it's configuration! However, I was switching back and forth from several other types that I was flying commercially. Maybe I was just a bit odd but that was my experience. I felt more comfortable while flying as IP on the right side of the Mohawk.
edit on 2-10-2014 by buddah6 because: lobotimization



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 01:18 PM
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originally posted by: cody599
a reply to: Timely

My dad used to work on harriers in the RAF, I was lucky enough to sit in some of them as a kid.
It was truly awesome. I remember my dad's words of wisdom to this day.

"DON'T touch anything" LOL

Cody


Lol I know the feeling! As a young buck I was a member of the US Navy Sea Cadets which was a Pre-ROTC grooming program running in my area. Our group did exceptional in all of our PT exercises and tests, and as a reward they allowed us to sit in the cockpit of an F-14 Tomcat.... man, I'll never forget that!!!
edit on 2-10-2014 by parad0x122 because: (no reason given)



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