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I Finally Found The Answers Concerning The Middle East Issues

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posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: lambros56
Is there a source for this snippet ?
Be good to share on other sites !
Nice find.


Came up in my email so just copy it.

Peace




posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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A search tells us that a Mr. Al-Sabah from London had the same idea...


That whole Middle East deal sure can be confusing. Thankfully, in this concise and clearly articulated letter to the editor published in the Financial Times, Mr KN Al-Sabah, of London, lays it all out in a way anyone can understand. In full, his letter, entitled "A Short Guide to the Middle East," read:



Helpful letter to the editor clears up confusion about the Middle East




edit on 27-9-2014 by Murgatroid because: I felt like it..



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 04:01 PM
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a reply to: Murgatroid

lol.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 06:33 PM
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Just in case someone out there is still trying to make sense out of this whole thing:



A Short Guide to the Middle East


MIDDLE EAST PRIMER


A couple of days ago, Egyptian blogger Big Pharaoh had a fantastic idea to graphically explain the Middle East:



I loved the idea but wasn't happy with the execution. I thought maybe I could make it easier to follow, streamlined and even add more detail. I admire good graphic design and it seemed like it was do-able.

Well, I don't think I succeeded in making it simpler.

Adding a few more vertices and nodes made it even more spectacularly complicated than before.

Maybe we can turn it into a board game.



My original intent was to add Copts, Kurds and (Lebanese) Druze to the chart, but things would have really gotten out of hand.

UPDATE: Some fixes; I put the wrong color for Turkey-Assad and added PA-Israel, some other stuff as people mention it. Continuously updating...

UPDATE 2: Yoel found a simplified guide, which Nevet translated:



Idiot's Guide to the Middle East

This morning I came across an article in the Financial Times that explains who supports who and who hates who in the Middle East. They asked that the story (text) not be copied and pasted so I am respecting that request. However, I thought this story might be conveyed as well or better in a graphical form so I produced the following graphic.

I don’t completely agree with every relationship as described by the article, but most, and this illustrates what a quagmire it is to get involved… Notice this does not even mention the various factions fighting Assad or the Palestinians and Israelis. Still it is quite a tangled mess...



A short guide to the Middle East




edit on 27-9-2014 by Murgatroid because: I felt like it..



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 06:37 PM
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here's my American guide to the middle east......we send our troops to die to defend them, so they will continue to give us oil.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 07:01 PM
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Concerning the comment mentioned above about turning it into a board game:



Available on Amazon for $13.59...



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 07:09 PM
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originally posted by: darkbake
a reply to: jude11

Is everyone sure that Saudi Arabia supports ISIS? I doubt it... ISIS is the black sheep. Other than that, I agree, the situation is about as complicated as the letter to the editor says, even more so, really.


Saudi Arabia has always supported fanatical Islam.

Saudi Arabia is a two faced monster. It hides its real activities.

You forget that all 9/11 hijackers were Saudi. How come there is such hatred in Saudi Arabia against USA??

edit on 27-9-2014 by GargIndia because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 07:15 PM
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"It has always seemed strange to me... the things we admire in men, kindness and generosity, openness, honesty, understanding and feeling, are the concomitants of failure in our system. And those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self-interest, are the traits of success. And while men admire the quality of the first they love the produce of the second." --John Steinbeck



The March to War: Fighting ISIL is a Smokescreen for US Mobilization against Syria, Iran

“The Israeli Dream”: The Criminal Roadmap Towards “Greater Israel”?



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: seasoul

Yes you are right. It is a smokescreen.

They find novel ways to fool public that is generally anti-war.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 08:29 PM
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originally posted by: Murgatroid
Concerning the comment mentioned above about turning it into a board game:



Available on Amazon for $13.59...


would be a great drinking game where everyone should drink no matter if you land on USA, Iran, Syria, Iraq, UK, Poland etc.
edit on 27-9-2014 by BlackNWhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 03:56 AM
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a reply to: jude11
There is a simple solution to the Middle East problems. Sneak a nuke into Tel Aviv and detonate it. Without a government and command and control of the military, Israel will be overrun very quickly. It is a very tiny country. If you sneak a nuke in, the nuclear armed subs will not know who is responsible, and they will have no one to order them where to launch their nukes at. All of this is accomplished with one bomb. Even with a missile launched nuke, the subs probably won't know who did it. A nuclear missile can be launched in the middle of a Hezbollah or Hamas rocket barrage. It would have to be launched from one of those locations so that it looks like a normal missile. That is why it is necessary for Hezbollah to keep getting more advanced missiles like they are. When it becomes normal for missiles that can carry a heavy warhead to be launched in one of these rocket wars, that is when a nuke can be snuck in.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 04:32 AM
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originally posted by: GargIndia

originally posted by: darkbake
a reply to: jude11

Is everyone sure that Saudi Arabia supports ISIS? I doubt it... ISIS is the black sheep. Other than that, I agree, the situation is about as complicated as the letter to the editor says, even more so, really.


Saudi Arabia has always supported fanatical Islam.

Saudi Arabia is a two faced monster. It hides its real activities.

You forget that all 9/11 hijackers were Saudi. How come there is such hatred in Saudi Arabia against USA??

Saudi Arabia and Qatar were the main players in funding the anti Assad terrorists. They also supplied them with chemical weapons. They have agreed to participate in these airstrikes. Turkey, a NATO allied, has not cooperated in these airstrikes. They have not even allowed the use of their airbases. The pro Islamist government in power in our NATO ally seemed to become jealous when the caliphate was announced by ISIS. They talked about starting their own caliphate. I guess they want a return to the Ottoman Empire. Now, they are helping ISIS. Maybe they want to make ISIS's caliphate, their caliphate. The Islamic State, IS (ISIS), is now attacking the Kurds. The Kurds are the enemies of Turkey. The Kurds have announced that they will break off the peace talks with Turkey that have been going on for years if ISIS does not stop their attacks. It's a big cluster#. Our allies, Saudi Arabia and Qatar, were supporting ISIS, but maybe no longer are. Now our NATO ally, Turkey, is supporting them. All of this came about because the US and the Sunni Arabs wanted to remove the Shiites from power in Syria. Now the Shia rebels in Yemen may be coming to power. So there will be a war there. Our ally Bahrain is majority Shia and ruled by Sunnis. It has a US military base. The people support Iran. Iraq was ruled by Sunni Baathist socialists under Saddam Hussein, while the majority were Shia. The Shia are in power now. They are Arabs who are influenced by the Shia Persians in Iran. Syria is ruled by Shia (Alawites, subsect of Shia) Baathists under Assad. Egypt is a Sunni military dictatorship and was briefly part of a state with Syria, the United Arab republic. Egypt is growing ties with Russia, Syria's ally, ever since the US supported the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood. Egypt and Syria are non fundamentalist military dictatorships. The US killed the nonfundamentalist military dictator in Libya, Muammar Khaddafi. Islamic fundamentalists now rule Libya. The US tried to overthrow Assad in Syria using Islamic fundamentalists like they did in Libya. The result was the formation of the Al Qaida linked Nusra Front and ISIS. The Free Syrian Army is the group the US supports. They are supposed to be moderates. The Free Syrian Army cooperates on the battlefield with the Nusra Front and can pass through its checkpoints. In the recent airstrikes, the US bombed ISIS, the Nusra Front, and core Al Qaida (they called them the Khorasan group because Al Qaida was supposed to be diminished). ISIS evacuated their buildings weeks and days before the strike because they knew it was coming. The US bombed empty buildings. The US did manage to kill the leader of the Nusra Front. Since that happened, Nusra fighters have begun to join ISIS. ISIS was advancing, taking towns, and gaining new members while the airstrikes were happening and news of the death of the Nusra Front leader was not known. The reason ISIS has become more capable is because the disillusioned former Baathists in Iraq, who were persecuted by the US installed Shia government of Al Maliki, have joined ISIS. They bring with them military experience, intelligence experience, and are led by Izzat Ibrahim al Douri, the King of Clubs.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 08:58 PM
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Basically USA has stirred a hornet's nest by invading Iraq and supporting civil war in Syria.

The whole region is de-stabilized - middle-east and north africa is burning and other places in the world are also coming into focus of trouble-makers.



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