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New Prescription Rules for Hydrocodone Set to Start in October.

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posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: whyamIhere

My letter from the VA makes it seem like the process isn't going to be that painful. Just e-mail my doc and get my scrip refilled monthly and my normal visits every few months. All that is being added is the monthly e-mails rather than 3 month supplies.

Like I said it won't effect me that much, but I feel for civilians that are going to be caught up in the whole thing.




posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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a reply to: U4ea82

I don't know there might be more to the regulation specifically for the doctors we're unaware of. The changes means that any hydrocodone pain meds cannot be refilled period. Which means the pharmacy cannot simply fax over to the doctor for approval. So a hand written script must be picked up or office visit whatever. The problem here is that some people may not have the ability to pickup a script or go in for an office visit which is the reason for faxing. A doctor may not write a scribe to a family member without a patient visit. With these new tighter regulations coming Oct 6th who knows it may be a complete fiasco.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:51 PM
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I hear the military has some hydro fields in the middle east.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: whyamIhere
I wish I could but currently, it is the only pharmacy in my area that will order name brand Fentanyl. All of the others refuse to order Duragesic. My insurance company will only pay for the name brand. My copay for the name brand is $15, whereas if I have to purchase generic it is $285.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:56 PM
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a reply to: Sremmos80 It's easier for a person or family member to pickup a drug than a doctor to just hand out a script to someone. With these new regulations that might cut that off completely. I guess we'll have to see.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: sean

Well hopefully I won't have to make another visit each month. I guess I'll find out for sure tomorrow. Thanks for the reply though



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: sean

I (at one time) suffered from an "over-affection" to vicodin. So I can see the attempt made to inhibit the potential to addiction.

But this won't stop someone who is addicted.

This will push people (honest people) to break the law instead of being open with their doctor and openly discuss options (which saved my bacon) to wean themselves off pain killers.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:00 PM
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originally posted by: seeker1963

originally posted by: James1982

originally posted by: seeker1963
a reply to: sean

Be prepared for a massive influx of Opiates on the Streets.

The Black Market, (government included) will make fortunes from selling illegal pain killers! Not to mention the increase of profits for the Corporate Prison system............

They act like they are doing it because they care, but in reality, rest assured it will end up being a great way for the illicit drug trade, ie CIA and Judicial/Prison system to fill more cots!



Why would there be an influx of opiates on the street when this thread is specifically about them increasing the roadblocks to obtain opiates?


Per the OP's source, the DEA is the agency responsible for implementing this program, due to an over abundance of prescription pain killers. Some people steal them, others sell them.

By decreasing the amount of prescription pain pills what do you think people will resort to as an alternative? The streets maybe?

I don't see the war on drugs going away anytime soon with this kind of thinking.


Our state has seen a huge surge in heroin overdose deaths since they cracked down on pain management clinics a couple of years ago. Here's just one story---if you Google Kentucky's heroin problem, you'll get lots of them.
www.courier-journal.com...
All the new laws in Kentucky did was to drive up the costs of the sought-after pharmaceuticals, to the point where heroin is cheaper but because there's no regulation on dosage, we're seeing a lot more overdose deaths.

The law of unintended consequences....



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:00 PM
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originally posted by: deadeyedick
I hear the military has some hydro fields in the middle east.


I'm sitting here getting a nice laugh at the mental picture of people plucking Norco tablets from bushes.

Besides which, hydrocodone shrubberies are all CIA. The military doesn't get any.
edit on 25-9-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:05 PM
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originally posted by: diggindirt

originally posted by: seeker1963

originally posted by: James1982

originally posted by: seeker1963
a reply to: sean

Be prepared for a massive influx of Opiates on the Streets.

The Black Market, (government included) will make fortunes from selling illegal pain killers! Not to mention the increase of profits for the Corporate Prison system............

They act like they are doing it because they care, but in reality, rest assured it will end up being a great way for the illicit drug trade, ie CIA and Judicial/Prison system to fill more cots!



Why would there be an influx of opiates on the street when this thread is specifically about them increasing the roadblocks to obtain opiates?


Per the OP's source, the DEA is the agency responsible for implementing this program, due to an over abundance of prescription pain killers. Some people steal them, others sell them.

By decreasing the amount of prescription pain pills what do you think people will resort to as an alternative? The streets maybe?

I don't see the war on drugs going away anytime soon with this kind of thinking.


Our state has seen a huge surge in heroin overdose deaths since they cracked down on pain management clinics a couple of years ago. Here's just one story---if you Google Kentucky's heroin problem, you'll get lots of them.
www.courier-journal.com...
All the new laws in Kentucky did was to drive up the costs of the sought-after pharmaceuticals, to the point where heroin is cheaper but because there's no regulation on dosage, we're seeing a lot more overdose deaths.

The law of unintended consequences....


I live in PA, not far from you and we have the same thing happening here.

As a matter a fact our State legislators just passed a law allowing use of a heroin overdose drug, along with a good Samaritan act which would prohibit them from being arrested for calling in an OD.

I guess you and I can see the writing on the wall already aye?



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:09 PM
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Good, hydrocodone sucks anyway.. Bad drug



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:10 PM
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originally posted by: seeker1963

As a matter a fact our State legislators just passed a law allowing use of a heroin overdose drug...


Nothing wrong with that. And it's not a "heroin overdose" drug, Narcan will reverse any opiate. It's a good thing that they'll let EMS and police administer it now.

Not that the users will like it, it harshes their buzz in an immediate and unforgettable way.
edit on 25-9-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:10 PM
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What a ripoff...

You should look into a mail pharmacy.

To run you out of meds is in humane and dangerous.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:12 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: seeker1963

As a matter a fact our State legislators just passed a law allowing use of a heroin overdose drug...


Nothing wrong with that. And it's not a "heroin overdose" drug, Narcan will reverse any opiate. It's a good thing that they'll let EMS and police administer it now.

Not that the users will like it, it harshes their buzz in an immediate and unforgettable way.


I stand corrected!

However, the governor hasn't signed the bill yet, so it isn't as I originally stated.

I am surprised they put the good Samaritan clause in though.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:14 PM
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They are putting any pain med that has hydrocodone in the same class 2 category as the higher drugs like oxycontin. Which means if your pills run out they cannot be refilled period through the pharmacy. You have to have hand written. This kills the ability for the pharmacy to fax your doctor for you for more medication that has zero refills and has ran out. Again in serious situation you may not have the option to go see the doctor or pickup a script. With the new laws the doctors may not just hand out a script to someone other than the patient. Some doctors are more compassionate. If you even see a doctor. Many people just see a PA and the doctor just floats around in the ethereal space time continuum.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:29 PM
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Hey guys this is my first post but this topic has kinda hit home. I'll keep it short. Anyways if you've been keeping up with the opiate problems how aday you see a large uprise in the use of heroin. The issue is that it is cheap, more potent and easy to find. In the late 90s the youth population was all about pills and now since the strict restrictions on doctors writing pain medication there are less and less pills on the street. OxyContin 80mg are up to 80 dollars on the street but heroin is 10-20. I know this as a doctor Volenteery in a recovery center. More and more people are using heroin due to this simple fact. And more and more people are overdosing and dieing becouse of the quality of the heroin now. It is no longer in the intercitys and in moving into the suburbs. We are seeing people of all ages that are now using heroin becouse they can't afford medication or the doctor lost their licance. Unfortunately the USA does not have programs like the UK for this.
Being a doctor my self I can tell you right now in my state before I write a prescription I have to look that person up in the state database to make sure they are not doctor shopping. And we can't fax any narcotic, they have to come in every month. I fully agree it is a pain for a lot of people my office tries to accommodate everyone's needs. We can write upto a 3 month script (as it is now).
Anyways that's my two cents. I feel it's going to cause more pain and suffering on the people that need them and more addiction issues with others that can't get there meds and have been on them.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: sean

The doc can also right you more then one script and post date the prescriptions.
This is not their first rodeo in this type of medication



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: Redwizrd

I can see a more regulation, but in what way does a fax of a script stop addiction?? I have my share of problems and have to have narc on hand. Back goes out, left hip goes out and probably will need surgery for that. Left ankle is fused with a 6 inch titanium bolt. I am constantly riddled with chronic pain and when something goes out I literally cannot walk for days. When I need a narc I need it! I take two at once just to take the edge off for a couple hours. I am in no way addicted. Twelve pills is all I am given. It lasted me the entire summer I still have 2 left :::knocks on wood::: I am lucky I haven't had such serious episodes this time around.

Seriously doc, why the hell do I have to beg for pills?? Why do I have to jump through hoops to prove myself? I always get told narcs are bad for you narcs ruin your liver, but they will recommend 1000mg of Ibuprofen twice a day. So ibuprofen helps inflammatory which helps pain I get it. I do use it too, but when your femur decides it wants to dislocate from your hip that's an entirely different kind of pain. In that point in time I wish I had morphine. The last episode I had to call an ambulance. I don't think Ibuprofen is going to fix that doc. It's getting to the point people got to beg, borrow, steal to get any real pain relief. I use to smoke marijuana years and years ago and I quit, I willed myself off cigarettes and quit, I don't drink.

I am seriously thinking of going back to marijuana and ingesting it in a pill form with or without the blessing of the feds. Piss on em! Here we are the great nation or once was and we have the worst the worst medical. My PA I see never checks my heart, carotid artery, never checks lungs, never checks a damn thing other than a pulse. I suppose if you have a pulse these days you're healthy. Where is the doctor? Oh he's out golfing with Obama. I am practically my own doctor!



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 10:41 PM
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originally posted by: seeker1963
However, the governor hasn't signed the bill yet, so it isn't as I originally stated.

I am surprised they put the good Samaritan clause in though.


Well, Narcan is a great thing if you don't quite know what might be going on. If you get to the scene and you have a guy that's down and unresponsive, and isn't breathing well, or at all, that can be an issue for LEOs or basic EMT. The LEOs generally don't have bag masks and oxygen in the cruiser. EMTs can't give narcan, although they at least have bag/valve/masks and o2. But if they're narced out enough, you might end up with more than respiratory depression and you could still lose them on the way, if it's a long drive.

This gives them a way to just administer it on the spot. If you're in opiate depression, bammo, instant (if not popular) cure. At least for an hour or so, long enough to get you to the ED. If you're having some other issue, it's rare that it will cause a problem.

That said, in some people, when they wake up they'll puke. If you don't have the guy on his side when you give it, or you're not willing to sit them up 'by hand' and keep them physically stable while the narcan works, you can have someone aspirate the puke, which is bad. Also, some small percentage of people will get immediate pulmonary edema with narcan. The good samaritan clause is to protect against lawsuit from those two outcomes.

It's not so different from epipens, you can give someone a heart attack with one, but it's unlikely.

I'm surprised that they didn't also consider including romazicon, although maybe you can't give it as a nose spray. Romazicon reverses benzos, another thing you see people down for. But it doesn't do it for nearly as long as Narcan.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 10:46 PM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: sean

The doc can also right you more then one script and post date the prescriptions.
This is not their first rodeo in this type of medication


Not in our state they can't, unless they want to be tried as felons and lose their license to practice. I know this for a fact from having been in the drug pushing racket for several years.



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