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Official: Fleas test positive for plague at Doney Park near Flagstaff

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posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:09 PM
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Ebola just isn't fast enough I'm guessing
now the Plague is here too...

Too many diseases lately, I wonder what else will show up...Sad times..

From the source..


FLAGSTAFF - Fleas collected near Flagstaff have tested positive for the plague, according to officials with the Coconino County Public Health Services District. The fleas were collected and tested as part of surveillance being done by the CCPHSD Environment Health staff due to the die-off of prairie dogs in the area. The fleas were taken from burrows at being monitored in the area near Doney Park. Residents in the area were notified of the positive test and those burrows have since been treated. Officials will continue to monitor the situation to determine if the area will need to be treated again.


www.abc15.com...


edit on 24-9-2014 by baddmove because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:11 PM
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Bubonic plague? This is a pretty vague article.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: tavi45

Yea, just the plain old plague,

no special name for this one...

except maybe- death?



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: baddmove

There's nothing really unusual about this.

The SW has been found to have plague carrying creatures many times over the years. This is why you shouldn't handle dead mammals when found. Rats. Ground Squirrels. Etc...

...and the Plague is very treatable. Unlike ebola, or some of the nastier bugs out there.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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Plague is common in many places in america.

We can treat an infection so don't be too alarmed.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:14 PM
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originally posted by: tavi45
Bubonic plague? This is a pretty vague article.



Bubonic and Pneumonic both caused by Yersinia pestis I believe.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:14 PM
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This year alone the US has seen pneumonic, classic and septicemic plague. I think Colorado has seen three types of plague so far.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: seagull

I agree totally. Now, Valley Fever is another story... that is some nasty sh*t. My parents Golden retriever has it and it about killed her. It was wrapped around her wind pipe.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: darkwingduck

That's the one I was trying to remember. ...and honta (sp?) virus. Truly nasty stuff.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:25 PM
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a reply to: seagull

Hantavirus is bad. A baby mouse was on my driveway all day yesterday. Must've been lost or abandoned. I felt so bad for it but knew I couldn't take it in. Found it death this morning with blood running out of its mouth. Sad to see it die but not worth catching hantavirus or something else.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 10:52 PM
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Hopefully it's nothing like theplague that affected people in Colorado this past July.

A bit dated now but thought this was a good thread on the subject are we seeing more or going to of the plague-
Are Incidents of the Plague in the United States on the Rise? - www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: seagull


This is why you shouldn't handle dead mammals when found. Rats. Ground Squirrels. Etc…

Good advice.

Fleas cling to their host with tenacity. They will hardly ever leave a warm host. As soon as that host dies however, the body temperature begins dropping almost immediately. That is the sign to the fleas to abandon ship in hopes of another host.

That could be you, if you walk up on a fresh or semi fresh kill going, "Hey everyone, look what I found!" and pick it up by the tail.

If you can't resist and you have to poke it, do it with a lengthy stick.

Best advice is wild life should remain wild.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 06:53 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: seagull


This is why you shouldn't handle dead mammals when found. Rats. Ground Squirrels. Etc…

Good advice.

Fleas cling to their host with tenacity. They will hardly ever leave a warm host. As soon as that host dies however, the body temperature begins dropping almost immediately. That is the sign to the fleas to abandon ship in hopes of another host.

That could be you, if you walk up on a fresh or semi fresh kill going, "Hey everyone, look what I found!" and pick it up by the tail.

If you can't resist and you have to poke it, do it with a lengthy stick.

Best advice is wild life should remain wild.


Wild life should remain wild? That's just racist.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 08:55 AM
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originally posted by: darkwingduck
a reply to: seagull

I agree totally. Now, Valley Fever is another story... that is some nasty sh*t. My parents Golden retriever has it and it about killed her. It was wrapped around her wind pipe.

Valley Fever took my nikki dog, last December, and I am VF survivor. It almost killed me 32 years ago, while in higschool and relapse last summer did a good job of trying, I lost more than 25lb in a week, and was bedridden for two weeks.
It's a harsh disease, not only do we have to think about VF here, add hanta virus, west Nile, plague and dengue fever, luckily that one is rare oh, yah and hot springs near here have the brain eating ameoba.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 09:08 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

A fast moving Chevy will make a mess of you, too. Don't text and drive.

Good info in your post, thank you.




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