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License Plate Readers appear Overnight on Interstate 5...Not a word to the Public.

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posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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I was driving along Interstate 5 in San Diego yesterday and there it was.

A license plate reader on a 30' pole with one facing each direction.

Because of ATS I knew immediately what it was. Looks like a camera to everyone else.



Well, I thought I had to be wrong. There was no debate, No Public Notice.

It just appeared overnight. I did this thread last year about my fair city...

32 Million Data collection points in San Diego Alone

So before I just wrote a thread accusing the PTB of doing this in our sleep...I googled it.

There it was in Police Chief Magazine...




A carjacking takes place in the Los Angeles area, and a notice to “be on the lookout” is sent out to patrol officers. A description of the suspect, vehicle, and license plate number is disseminated via radio broadcasts and computerized databases. License plate reader (LPR)–equipped patrol cars and fixed-camera systems mounted along Southern California’s freeways begin “looking” for the suspect vehicle. If a patrol officer does not spot the suspect vehicle first, the strategically placed fixed, mounted cameras throughout the region most likely will. Along the Interstate 5 (I-5) freeway, a major artery from the Los Angeles area into San Diego County that terminates at the U.S.-Mexico border, a fixed, mounted camera captures the image of the suspect’s license plate and vehicle as the suspect heads out of the Los Angeles area into San Diego County. An alert sounds in a dispatch center, and a countywide broadcast advises officers of the suspect vehicle’s location along the I-5 freeway. Officers from multiple agencies throughout the county hear the broadcast simultaneously. Patrol officers begin to form a “gauntlet” by watching for the suspect vehicle from numerous on-ramps along the I-5 freeway. Sure enough, the vehicle is spotted, and patrol cars move in, capturing the suspect and recovering the vehicle.


They say they are using it for Stolen Cars....Poppycock

They are using it for everything. If the people in my City want this intrusion...Fine

But, to put them up in the middle of the Night without a word to anyone ?

Police State Much...

Police Chief Magazine




posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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Do they need to ask for permission to monitor a state highway?



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: whyamIhere

Are we sure those are cameras to read license plates? The reason I ask is I don't see a lens in the photo presented.. The front of those things looks flat . More like receivers that enable emergency traffic to change traffic signals as they approach. Or low jack? maybe cell phone trackers? Just wandering foolishly I am sure.

I am sure thy are monitoring this as in the link you provide to another thread that clearly shows they are dong this. But those are cameras, with lenses.

ETA: heres what I am used to Traffic Signal changers looking like… don't know about the ones in the OP.

Image
edit on 22-9-2014 by intrptr because: added image



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 11:46 AM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
Do they need to ask for permission to monitor a state highway?


Monitor....No

Collect a database of your travels....Yes



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: whyamIhere

Are we sure those are cameras to read license plates? The reason I ask is I don't see a lens in the photo presented.. The front of those things looks flat . More like receivers that enable emergency traffic to change traffic signals as they approach. Or low jack? maybe cell phone trackers? Just wandering foolishly I am sure.

I am sure thy are monitoring this as in the link you provide to another thread that clearly shows they are dong this. But those are cameras, with lenses.


I just found that picture. That's not exactly what they look like.

The ones I saw were more tubular and did not have that cover over the lens.

I saw a picture of these exact readers somewhere...I thought it was ATS.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: whyamIhere

this will actually back fire on them. When a cop runs a license place it shows all other agencies that ran that plate. For example if you said you werent in a specific location at a specific time and your car was ran you could then interview the cop that ran your license plate from whatever other jurisdiction. This will spam, so to speak, all the inquiries. If they put these up all over it takes away a huge a tool. Its over kill and ridiculous but im trying to find the silver lining in it.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: whyamIhere


I saw a picture of these exact readers somewhere…I thought it was ATS.

You got me. They are definitely new looking and both appear to be pointing one direction, at traffic. That implies a stereoscopic view with two of them. Waiting for others to chime in.

Lots of stuff appearing atop poles on roadways these days. Gun shot detectors, eyes in the sky camera domes, police radio boosters. In my part of the weld there is something on every corner.

Except the ticket giver pole, so many times it got destroyed by irate drivers, they finally abandoned it (the pole) in place.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: whyamIhere

You have no reasonable expectation to privacy while in public.

And add this to the ever growing list of ways to be tracked in todays world.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:09 PM
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Just out of curiosity, if the Highway Patrol, or whoever, announced 30 days in advance that they were going to install the cameras, what options would citizens have? File a law suit? Alleging what? Marching on the State Capitol? How many times a month does that happen?

Perhaps I'm apathetic, but I don't see a winning strategy here.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:18 PM
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I know the OP has said he just grabbed the pic and I am interested to know more about what he has shown… that would be different than license plate monitoring in the thread topic. Although I would be interested to see the cameras he is referring to.

Found this on IR sensors for traffic flow monitoring and sensing of cars and pedestrians…


The sensors are mounted overhead to view approaching or departing traffic or traffic from a side-looking configuration. Infrared sensors are used for signal control; volume, speed, and class measurement, as well as detecting pedestrians in crosswalks.

Traffic sensors



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:22 PM
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originally posted by: charles1952
Just out of curiosity, if the Highway Patrol, or whoever, announced 30 days in advance that they were going to install the cameras, what options would citizens have? File a law suit? Alleging what? Marching on the State Capitol? How many times a month does that happen?

Perhaps I'm apathetic, but I don't see a winning strategy here.


I see some 4th Amendment issues with them logging your travels.

But you're probably right. Nobody would care. Maybe a lawsuit might stop them.

They would just hide it then. I don't have any answers except to defund them.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:22 PM
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You Americans are so behind the times, We in the UK have had them the length and breadth of the country for over 10 years now...We call them the Yellow Vultures.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: whyamIhere

We have those here in Colorado... Even the cop cars carry them.
Not only does the system give them drives information but it'll cross reference Drivers Lic. info to. On their computer screens it gives them a little photo of what the driver should look like.

Here they can use it to tell if you've been speeding, though I've yet to hear about a ticket being written. All I know about that is when you pass one of these plate readers it also logs in the time you were there. So when you get to the next one, say five miles away a simple math formula (Time and Distance) gives them the speed traveled to get there. As I said it has that potential but I haven't heard of anyone getting a ticket from it...yet

Edit to add.
From Wiki

According to a 2012 report by the Police Executive Research Forum, approximately 71% of all US police departments use some form of ANPR.[31] Mobile ANPR is becoming a significant component of municipal predictive policing strategies and intelligence gathering,[32] as well as for recovery of stolen vehicles, identification of wanted felons, and revenue collection from individuals who are delinquent on city or state taxes or fines, or monitoring for "Amber Alerts". Successfully recognized plates may be matched against databases including "wanted person", "protection order", missing person, gang member, known and suspected terrorist, supervised release, immigration violator, and National Sex Offender lists.[33] In addition to the real-time processing of license plate numbers, ALPR systems in the US collect (and can indefinitely store) data from each license plate capture. Images, dates, times and GPS coordinates can be stockpiled and can help place a suspect at a scene, aid in witness identification, pattern recognition or the tracking of individuals.

edit on 22-9-2014 by HardCorps because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
I know the OP has said he just grabbed the pic and I am interested to know more about what he has shown… that would be different than license plate monitoring in the thread topic. Although I would be interested to see the cameras he is referring to.

Found this on IR sensors for traffic flow monitoring and sensing of cars and pedestrians…


The sensors are mounted overhead to view approaching or departing traffic or traffic from a side-looking configuration. Infrared sensors are used for signal control; volume, speed, and class measurement, as well as detecting pedestrians in crosswalks.

Traffic sensors



I can get a picture this PM.

It is in a bad spot to pull over. I stay up with what they are mounting on the poles.

I will try to find the picture as well.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: whyamIhere


I can get a picture this PM.

It is in a bad spot to pull over.

Stay safe.


I stay up with what they are mounting on the poles.

Me too. the battle of the red light fine pole on my local corner was hilarious. The other surveillance stuff disheartens me.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: charles1952




Just out of curiosity, if the Highway Patrol, or whoever, announced 30 days in advance that they were going to install the cameras, what options would citizens have?


Well if you steal cars you would know to stay away from that road.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: whyamIhere


They say they are using it for Stolen Cars....Poppycock


There's no such thing as a "stolen car" anymore, ever since they put immobilizer chips in, which are mandatory in North America now (I believe).

Cars that are "stolen" now a days are two scenario, one very rare and the other more prevalent. The first is the rarer, actual stolen car, where the thief lifts the keys or has spoofing gadgetry that can emit the immobilizer code, but don't forget many cars have laser cut keys as well.

This doesn't happen that often, considering the person has to physically take the keys, or have access to the dealership or car manufacturer in some way.

The second, which makes up most car thefts is an insurance scam, where, the car thieves (a) ask some random person, friend or acquaintance (b), "Hey, can I steal your car?"

(b) decides they aren't happy with their car anymore, and would like an insurance payout because they owe more for their car than its worth. So (a) gets a copy of (b)'s keys, and (b) goes to a public place or somewhere with cameras to show where they were, while (b) gets in and takes the car to either 1. chop shop, or 2. temp location to possible remove some security equipment from the car, (lowjack), which will then end up on a container ship to be sent to Africa or Eastern Europe to sell the car for double its new price tag value. (Certain places its a lot for any car, new or used.)

So, its definitely not for "stolen cars"



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:51 PM
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I had heard about this about a year ago, and how most were already in effect. I thought that a lot of Companies were buying the data, for all kinds of information gathering, Towing, Insurance, Police. but somewhere I heard of a company collecting the info, and thought man thats a very weird Company to be gathering this info, Just need to remember what it was. sorry



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: Glassbender777

The company was most likely TrapWire
I posted a little blip on them last week
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Somehow their system/ got pulled into the FBI's new Next Generation Identification (NGI) system.

stuff of totalitarian dystopia: fingerprint databases, iris scan details, more than 50 million images used for facial recognition (a.k.a. "faceprints"), and the capacity to hoard information of individualizing details like gait, voice pattern, and tattoos.


Now that I think about I bet the FBI's NGI is tied into the plate reader system too?



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 01:19 PM
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In my city on every single intersection pole there is AT LEAST 2 other devices in place besides the cameras...idk what they even are.

And does anybody else find it odd how the cameras are never aimed at the street corners; but rather directly into the windshields of passing cars?







 
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