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5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites 'exhibit significant damage'

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posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:38 PM
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Location of sites damaged in Syria:



Caption: AAAS analyzed satellite images of six Syrian World Heritage sites: the Ancient City of Aleppo; the Ancient City of Bosra; the Ancient City of Damascus; the Ancient Site of Palmyra; a site encompassing two castles, Crac des Chevaliers and Qal’at Salah El-Din; and the Ancient Cities of Northern Syria, and the Ancient Cities of Northern Syria (Jebel Seman, Jebel Barisha, Jebel Al A’la, Jebel Wastani, and Jebel Zawiye). Credit: AAAS




The AAAS analysis reveals extensive damage in Aleppo, one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, dating to the 2nd millennium B.C.: "In satellite imagery, massive destruction is obvious throughout the city, and especially at the World Heritage site of the Ancient City," Wolfinbarger said. Destroyed structures include historic mosques and madrasas (Koranic schools), the Great Mosque of Aleppo, the Suq al-Madina, the Grand Serail of Aleppo, the Hammam Yalbougha an-Nasry, the Khusruwiye Mosque, the Carlton Citadel Hotel, and the Khan Qurt Bey caravanserai, as well as other historic buildings south and north of the citadel.


Damage to Syrian sites



Caption: Between Dec. 6, 2011, (top) and July 14, 2014, (bottom), the Ministry of Justice building was heavily damaged (red arrow), as was the Khusriwiye Mosque (green arrow). The Carlton Citadel Hotel (blue arrow) was completely destroyed. By Aug. 10, 2014, the Khusriwiye Mosque had been almost completely demolished (green arrow),the Grand Serail was heavily damaged (orange arrow) and the dome of the Hammam Yalbougha an‐Nasry was destroyed (purple arrow). Credit: Credit: Images©2014, DigitalGlobe|Analysis AAAS.Coordinates36.19N, 37.16E.





Caption: Between Oct. 10, 2009, (top) and March 8, 2014, (bottom), Palmyra's North Roman Necropolis has been disrupted by road construction and numerous earthen berms (pink arrows) to provide cover for military vehicles (yellow arrows). Credit: Images ©2014, DigitalGlobe | Analysis AAAS. Coordinates 34.55N, 38.26E.

A more detailed report with larger images
edit on 21/9/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:58 PM
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Much like the sites in Iraq that were damaged during the US invasion, or even the Baalbek site which has see-sawed between the IDF and Hamas. At the rate modern humans are going, we won't have any history preserved, even the stuff in the museums isn't safe - Iraq and Egypt were both looted during their recent wars/uprisings.

Most people may not know that it was the eastern Semites from the region of ancient Syria that formed one part of the fertile crescent, whose people would play such a pivotal role in shaping Sumer during the course of it's history and eventually forming the Abrahamic faiths.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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originally posted by: Blackmarketeer
Much like the sites in Iraq that were damaged during the US invasion, or even the Baalbek site which has see-sawed between the IDF and Hamas. At the rate modern humans are going, we won't have any history preserved, even the stuff in the museums isn't safe - Iraq and Egypt were both looted during their recent wars/uprisings.

Most people may not know that it was the eastern Semites from the region of ancient Syria that formed one part of the fertile crescent, whose people would play such a pivotal role in shaping Sumer during the course of it's history and eventually forming the Abrahamic faiths.


I've been to a number of the sites mentioned above in Syria so I feel a special loss for them and I especially fear for the Pre-Pottery Neolithic Settlements like Tell Qaramel and others, they are very easy to destroy.

Gobekli Tepe is just over the border from Syria in Turkey and the people who built it probably live part of the time in what is now Syria.

Edited to add GT is 30 kilometers from the Syrian border
edit on 21/9/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 10:25 PM
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Maybe that's partly the intent of ISIS in that area, make sure certain history is destroyed. Or are they looking for something stored.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 10:30 PM
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originally posted by: dreamingawake
Maybe that's partly the intent of ISIS in that area, make sure certain history is destroyed. Or are they looking for something stored.


They have been following a pattern of destroying the sites of any sect or religion that is not their own brand of Sunni hyper Wahhabism.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune

makes me sick
www.breitbart.com...


Not just the Christian legacy is threatened by their presence, however-- thousands of years of civilization may be destroyed under the group's reign of terror. The Associated Press reports the Islamic State has taken to destroying key archaeological sites in Iraq and Syria-- much of which includes the ancient land of Mesopotamia-- and subsidizing their income with black market sales of ancient artifacts. In addition to Mosul, the Islamic State controls four ancient cities -- Nineveh, Kalhu, Dur Sharrukin and Ashur-- which gives them nearly unbridled access to a treasure trove of statues, tiles, and other highly-coveted items by collectors. Nineveh alone contains 1,800 of Iraq's 12,000 registered archaeological sites. Qais Hussein Rashid, head of the Iraqi state-run Museums Department, tells the Associated Press that increased awareness of their black market trading is necessary to combat the problem. "They are cutting these reliefs [of Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II, in the city of Kalhu] into small parts and selling them," Rasheed continued. "They don't need to excavate. They just need a chain saw to cut the king's head or legs if they want



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:18 AM
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Enemies of everyone in the present. And now, enemies of every human being past, present, and future.

I found a National Geographic from decades ago and it had a long article about Syria under Assad's dad, and certainly it was not the freest country in the world, but all the inhabitants were cheerful and friendly, and the country beautiful and at peace... I had started a plan a couple years ago to visit Turkey and Syria, and im afraid I will never see their treasures...



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: Ridhya
Enemies of everyone in the present. And now, enemies of every human being past, present, and future.

I found a National Geographic from decades ago and it had a long article about Syria under Assad's dad, and certainly it was not the freest country in the world, but all the inhabitants were cheerful and friendly, and the country beautiful and at peace... I had started a plan a couple years ago to visit Turkey and Syria, and im afraid I will never see their treasures...


You missed a window of opportunity to see Syria, at some point it will be rebuilt but it may be a generation or more. I use to work with Syrians and I have say they lived in an unpleasant tyranny. I'm glad I had an opportunity to see Aleppo Palmyra, walk down the 'street called straight' and see where Captain Richard Burton had been.
edit on 22/9/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)


Q

posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 09:56 PM
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How very sad.

Some of the very oldest relics of humanity are here.

What wonders Aleppo could teach us...if only these dimwits would stop blowing things up.

They were doing some interesting work on the temple of the storm god before all this broke out.

Ultimately, I'm just mad at the loss of human history. We're just now starting to piece things together, and it's hard enough digging through thousands of millenia of entropy without people helping it along!



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