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CDC warns 500,000 will be infected with Ebola by January

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posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

If she (the infected nurse) was showing symptoms, how is it that she was able to perform her duties?


Amazingly, poor people manage every day. How? 'Cuz they know the rent needs to be paid, kids need to be fed, and the rest. People -especially mothers- drag their sick butts out of bed, put one foot in front of the other, hope they won't fall down and just keep going however they can, as long as they can. Why? Because they have no choice.

Next time you eat out, think about this. Ask your server how much they're paid. Ask how much the cook is paid. Ask if they get sick days.






edit on 22/9/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: ElohimJD


But this is just my opinion.

As well this is mine. I don't now if anyone said this yet in regards to solutions in the blood stream so here goes. The reason Ebola is so successful at spreading is because mot only does it hide from detection for up to 21 days in the period of incubation, but it also is hiding from the bodies immune system.

Ebola filovirus stands enter the blood stream and immediately seek out red blood cells and enter them. Replication occurs inside the blood cell, not in the blood stream. Only when the cell dies and ruptures do the hundreds of virus copies pour into the blood stream where they all seek out fresh cells to invade and hide in. The effectiveness of UV, silver or anything you put into the blood is limited by the time it has to catch the Ebola virus outside the cell walls.

If the dose of whatever "snake oil" was strong enough to kill the virus it would have to kill the cell outright to get at the virus inside. Thats part of the insidiousness of the beast and why the death rate is so high.

Ninja man.

Hope that helps.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: soficrow


You keep missing the point - and the important info - 'cuz you did not read to the end of my post. If you want to keep arguing basic science, you'll lose.

The point I am trying to get you to back off making is that it is not transmissible until symptoms show. it is erroneous and misleading.

If you got it, you can give it.



There are serious problems with Ebola - one being that its new mutations may affect transmission, which was never well understood. No, we're not being told everything. Yes, we're being misinformed. Yes, there's something wonky going on here. However, the scientific fact remains: viral diseases are not contagious until the incubation period is over - the infected cells die, burst open, and the virus particles start "shedding" into your body and the environment. eta: This is when the contagious period starts.

Ebola's incubation period is 2 to 21 days - a helluva range - and Ebola might be like a cold where there's an infectious day or so when symptoms aren't obvious. But no way no how is a patient infectious from the first point of exposure/infection.


Are colds and the flu most contagious before or after you start showing symptoms?

Myths about contagion are a regular part of life. Remember when AIDS could be transmitted by a handshake? Most fictions regarding how you can catch diseases aren't quite that bizarre and off the mark -- they usually sound pretty reasonable, which is how a lot of them get passed through generations as unquestioned truths. Many of us understand that when it comes to a cold or the flu, we're most contagious before we start feeling sick; that by the time we've got a runny nose, sore throat and achy muscles, the damage to the people around us has already been done. In fact, many of us are completely wrong.

If you think about how a virus works, it makes sense that we're most contagious when our symptoms are at their worst. Viruses like influenza and those that cause the common cold (there are a couple of hundred of them) have an incubation period once they get into your body. The virus gets into a group of healthy cells and then goes about requisitioning their survival apparatus from the inside. During this incubation period, while the virus is multiplying inside those infected cells, you have no symptoms -- no sore throat, no runny nose, no achy muscles -- and no virus spreading like wildfire throughout your body so that every drop of saliva or mucous you produce contains it. And that's how a virus spreads from one person to another: By a healthy person coming into contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person, whether those fluids are airborne (as from a sneeze) or left on a doorknob by a sick person who just wiped his nose. So if you have no symptoms yet, it's a lot less likely that you're going to spread the virus to another person.

Once the cells that have been taken over by the virus start to die, that's when all hell breaks loose. Here's when you start having symptoms, and you start spreading it to everyone you know if you're not careful. Some of those symptoms are caused by the virus itself (runny nose and sore throat, for example), and others are caused by your immune system(fever and exhaustion, for instance). When the virus breaks out of those dead cells and starts infecting tons of other cells throughout your body, your immune system recognizes that something is wrong and begins its counterattack. All of this can take days to happen. With the flu in particular, the time between exposure and the onset of symptoms is usually between one and four days.

So, when are you most contagious? Most experts agree that adults with a cold or the flu start being contagious about a day before they start experiencing symptoms. For the flu, the contagious period then lasts five to seven days into the illness. For children, the contagious period for the flu can last up to two weeks after they start feeling sick, even if they start feeling better before that. The contagious period for a cold lasts about three to four days into the illness. As a general rule, people with a cold are most contagious about three days after their initial exposure to the virus.








edit on 22/9/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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Can't help thinking Zombie apocalypse.. I know
their not zombies .. but still.. that's what comes to mind.

Bad times.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

M'dear, I've been in restaurant management for nigh on twenty years, I've no need for further enlightenment on those factors you've mentioned and is an example I've used myself to further elucidate my reasons for thinking this would spread in our western world as quickly as it is over there.

 


a reply to: intrptr

Thank you very much, I certainly did not mean to come across as trying to show anyone up. There are so many aspects of this situation and I've been looking at it closely for a good little bit so I've got a decent list of resources built up in my posts to which I am able to refer back, soficrow puts me to shame in both time and the quality of content of her posts.

What I wouldn't give to have a fusion center in which to work with her, ikonoklast, and few others on this and many other issues...



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

I hate to bring this up, and not that the sky is falling, but speaking of mutations affecting transmission, do you think it's possible there's a new intermediary host involved now (not necessarily pigs), and promoting airborne transmission? ...True, most Ebola transmission has always occurred in hospitals but.... Tried to flag this for intrptr but he wasn't into it:


Replication, Pathogenicity, Shedding, and Transmission of Zaire ebolavirus in Pigs

....Results. Following mucosal exposure, pigs replicated ZEBOV to high titers (reaching 107 median tissue culture infective doses/mL), mainly in the respiratory tract, and developed severe lung pathology. Shedding from the oronasal mucosa was detected for up to 14 days after infection, and transmission was confirmed in all naive pigs cohabiting with inoculated animals.

Conclusions. These results shed light on the susceptibility of pigs to ZEBOV infection and identify an unexpected site of virus amplification and shedding linked to transmission of infectious virus.

Discussion
.........There is increasing experimental evidence indicating that the Ebola virus glycoprotein can mediate entry from the apical side into intact airway epithelia of mouse, nonhuman primate, or human origin [28, 30–32]. The presence of Ebola antigens was also detected in the respiratory mucosa, alveoli, and pulmonary lymphatic tissue of nonhuman primates following aerosolized Ebola challenge, demonstrating that the virus can infect nonhuman primates through mucosal exposure with ebolavirus [33].

.....These studies underline some differences in the pathology induced by ZEBOV in pigs, compared with nonhuman primates and humans. In contrast to the severe systemic syndrome often leading to shock and death in primates, pigs developed a respiratory syndrome that could be mistaken for other porcine respiratory diseases.

....These data also have implications for the management of human outbreaks following accidental or hypothetically intentional exposure of pigs to Ebola virus.(!)



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: soficrow


it makes sense that we're most contagious when our symptoms are at their worst.


So if you have no symptoms yet, it's a lot less likely that you're going to spread the virus to another person.

But not impossible, not an urban myth. Thanks for your input Soficrow, I only had that one issue with the information you have presented. I enjoy reading your contributions on ATS and have followed along, been following along with Ebola since before this current outbreak.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: soficrow>>>> Seeing lots of chemtrail activity with government jets flying over every morning. Its weird. You see the jets( wide body twin engine jobs) one after another, and then right behind them, same exact flight path, you see a military fighter.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: soficrow
I do think it's possible.

EDIT: I began to wonder if domestic pigs were common in West Africa.
A quick Google search turned up plenty, including instructions for farmers:
www.smallstarter.com...

I also wish that Ebola could be a topic in its own right on ATS; a comprehensive place for all of the threads.



edit on 22-9-2014 by drwill because: added link



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 07:17 PM
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I don't think the 1st world has much to worry about honestly, i've said in a dozen threads that it will be Africa followed by non modernized Muslim nations that take the brunt of the hit and be it if you look at this from a "conspiracy" pov or a "natural" pov the results will be the same...

If it's depopulation time you don't need to depopulate nations that are already into sustainable or declining birth rates, particularly places that produce modern tech and education.

If it's just rampant spreading disease the exact same science based modern populations literally have an infinitely greater capacity to contain it. even air-born it wouldn't make it far beyond some dense urban zones in a place like the US, for starters in Africa there are people who don't even know Ebola exits most likely and are within range, have no idea. Here without even a single case we have social media, news etc, live web cams and the like and... not one case yet, but everyone in the forum knows more about Ebola than most of the African continent does, halting travel if it gets bad is easy here, impossible there, we all are aware of Americas crowd control capacities, have much better nutrition, immune systems... the capacity to stay inside, digital capacity to track people and identify who they had contact with.... on and on

It'll hit here, but not to 1/20th the degree



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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sad news indeed



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: soficrow



rense.com...


This is a link from a resource i used in another article. But the main is this link talks about a Texas Professor who advocated culling the population by 90% using an airborne Ebola virus. He did so in front of a big classroom full of Scientist and other Professors who all gave him a standing ovation afterwards. Stuff like what your are talking about has me seriously wondering.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: soficrow
Thousands 'evade' Ebola lockdown in Sierra Leone... what a mess !

youtu.be...



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky
They're running. And the virus is carried along. Yep: a mess.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

A point I've seen made in another thread, probably even made by you, that with all off the uncounted and unburied dead, how many animals have consumed the remains and then extended the reach of the virus outside of areas it otherwise might not have ventured beyond.

We know it was presumed to have been acquired from bats, and that there are several animals it can and does reside within, both symptomatically and asymptomatically. I presume it can move back and forth between any of its several vectors, some less so than others.

Point I'm making here is that there are many ways it can spread and not have to be airborne to have tremendously detrimental effects world wide.

But, as you point out, it could still conceivably mutate to a human transmissible airborne form.

The MSF AMA on reddit really does set my mind at ease on that regard though:



[–]ELasry[S] 111 points 2 days ago 

To woody121: Thank you! No reason why Ebola should mutate to an airborne virus. It survives in body fluids, but not on dry surfaces due to it's lipid membrane.


That being said, never say never with a virus.



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 09:51 PM
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I wonder if 500,000 is too high of an estimate for the end of the year? Although the virus is spreading into densely-populated areas... that is a big jump, in my opinion.

But what I am seeing is that people in charge are panicking - I'm not sure if anything productive is going to be done to stop the virus before it continues spreading.

The fatality rate is 90%, which is what makes the virus scary. That, and it is brutal.
edit on 22pmMon, 22 Sep 2014 21:58:14 -0500kbpmkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

Thank you for that link. The doctor also mentioned that the virus presented with unusual symptoms:



Furthermore, the disease presented in a somewhat different way, with less hemorrhagic symptoms initially, and a lot of gastrointestinal symptoms, mimicking gastroenteritis for which less methods of infection control would be put in place. The health systems of these countries were already very weak, sometimes supplies are in shortage (even gloves), making infection control even more difficult.


www.reddit.com...



posted on Sep, 22 2014 @ 10:43 PM
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originally posted by: darkbake
I wonder if 500,000 is too high of an estimate for the end of the year? Although the virus is spreading into densely-populated areas... that is a big jump, in my opinion.

But what I am seeing is that people in charge are panicking - I'm not sure if anything productive is going to be done to stop the virus before it continues spreading.

The fatality rate is 90%, which is what makes the virus scary. That, and it is brutal.


Too high? Try this on for size! They upped it to over 1,000,000 possible infected in January!!!

"CDC scientists conclude there may be as many as 21,000 reported and unreported cases in just those two countries as soon as the end of this month, according to a draft version of the report obtained by The Associated Press. They also predict that the two countries could have a staggering 550,000 to 1.4 million cases by late January."


Link

edit on 22-9-2014 by 59demon because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2014 @ 01:15 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

OK OK, I was just randomly just looking around at google earth for other various reason and one city I decided to look up was Monrovia Liberia. The place is stacked and packed and surprisingly looks pretty modern and even has street names you would think to find here in the us in local neighborhoods, but considering its ties and such. The whole way the city of monrovia is build I was not joking when I said its stacked, so yes if there were to be an outbreak this place would be a prime candidate for all kinds of things, and i see were you get your number could exponentially grow, a good chunk country is probably living in that city alone, and they would definitely all have contact with somebody or others in many ways daily, its practically a mouse maze with a potential of bumping into another mouse every time you turn around. So going by the city structure alone then yes 500,000 hosts in a few months is quite possible.

I dont really know what to think about this whole thing, I got ideas. But we will see what happens, but with those numbers its also quite possible that a good portion could also create the vaccine to fight this thing, as well as help mutate it into all kinds of new and unforeseen ways. If i was a biologist or if such things interested me, this would be quite a thrill, but I am not. And if if this is some conspiracy, I mean it is pretty mysterious how all of a sudden it just poops up, but if somebody is looking to weaponize it I would say this is the perfect testing bed, or even more likely that its weaponized already.

So really I can think a few other things, but really you people keep saying to do something more. But really if this ebola thing is as bad as you say and more bite then bark, really I dont see people going in there willingly, and those that are, well there probably signing a lot of paperwork that says so and so is not responsible for any ect ect, so sign on the doted line. Quarantine may not work great or even at all, but with what they have to work with its, well its what they have to work with.
edit on 1amTuesdayam232014f2amTue, 23 Sep 2014 01:16:29 -0500 by galadofwarthethird because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2014 @ 03:43 AM
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Agenda 21, wipe out billions of people.



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