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50 Things About Millennials That Make Corporate America [snip] Its Pants

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posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:33 PM
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Yea. It is, make no mistake, the parents of the millennials with entitlement complexes and like to blame us for their divorces, their complete lack of care about the outside world and/or even attempting to change it. All these self-righteous people talking smack about the millennials...are mostly screw-ups, and most of them clearly have no touch on reality. Our generation can hardly get out of their parent's house because debt to get into school is so high we wouldn't be able to eat two slices of bread. It's just not worth it. The older generation deserves to be completely underminded, because all you have to do is turn on the news to see, well.....they didn't do even a remote "decent" job. Yet the millennials are lazy, right?
edit on 21-9-2014 by Flesh699 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:42 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

No one can refute the facts you present in your replys.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:43 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer
With the advent of the automobile, the buggy (hence the whip) no longer needed to be made. People were out of a job.

But then comes that wonderful concept of adaptation. People adjust to the current economic scenario, or they don't.

We talk about the separation of generations, yet older folks like myself have adapted. I remember writing my masters thesis on a Brother Word Processor, and I thought I was futuristic!
Now? I can "network" and utilize the same tools and social media options that the younger kids can.

It's a competitive world. And while you may get a trophy for just showing up in school, life doesn't work the same way.

Neither does business.


I too have written papers on a Word Processor, nothing fancy just my grade school stuff but I learned to read at 2 years old and by three I was capable of using a computer/modem going onto BBS's, and typing what I'm sure I thought were important thoughts worthy of sharing on the considerably less vast internet we had back in the mid-late 80's. I learned to type before I learned to write the alphabet with a pencil.

I'm familiar with the concept of adaptation, and that leads me to why I believe our current economic system is broken. On another forum one of my predictions for the future is that of robots taking over the service industry, I often write about robot waiters and what that is going to do to our unemployment rate. These stories come out of China all the time, they are pushing hard into the robotics industry, here's an example of one story, sorry it's a video but it's very recent. We have exported our skilled labor jobs in favor of largely low skill service sector jobs that can and will be automated. In another thread recently there was talk of a machine that makes burgers at McDonalds, it removes the fry cook, burger flipper, and burger manufacturer replacing them with a single machine. That's a reduction in McDonalds labor of around 60%, these robot waiters reduce the labor in a restaurant by 80%.

Regardless of what we pay people these machines WILL replace humans because no human even in third world countries can work for a wage of 1 cent/hour. What is going to happen to our real unemployment rate when these things start becoming more widespread? We can count ourselves lucky in the US so far that despite being a tech leader we haven't adopted these things. Within a decade they will likely be here, 15 years if we're slow to adopt. We must have an educated work force in order to provide jobs for people when the next round of the automation revolution happens. But on top of that we must have jobs for those educated workers too. What we've done is export the real jobs, and replaced them with jobs that we're going to soon be automating.


originally posted by: TDawgRex
a reply to: Aazadan
Well, let's look at it from your perspective. The world is getting more populated. That populace is becoming more educated, men and women. Yet, despite all the wars, famine and pandemics, it still keeps getting more populated.

The labor pool is there for whatever first world country to exploit.

I'm not saying that's right by any means...but it's true as well.

Maybe we, the global populace need is one of the three listed above to even things out on a global scale.

The Georgia Guide-stones come to mind.


In developed nations the birth rate is actually going in reverse, which coincidentally enough happens to be the humane way to reach the guidestones population advice. The populations of developed nations are only continuing to rise due to immigration.

This ties into what I was saying to beezer too. The unskilled labor pool we typically exploit in developing countries is a problem that's going to solve itself. It sucks for us while that happens but the lower skill the job the easier it is to automate. Robotics will replace people in these jobs, and they work for even less than the person while performing the job locally so there are no shipping logistics.

Part of the solution is to have people perform jobs that machines can't but another part of the solution is that we're going to need to move to a new economic system. We already have a situation where not everyone who wants to work can, and before long we face the very real prospect of having 60% unemployment just because there is no work to be done. We can't limit survival to just the remaining 40% because the 60% will not go quietly.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Maybe, maybe not. It hasn't been up for long and my points don't really fit into concise soundbites. Rather than blindly agree/disagree with me though I would be happy if people simply realize that these are actual issues we need to solve.

The jobs are gone and they aren't coming back, instead it's just the opposite we are going to lose more jobs as time goes on. The current economic system doesn't work for our generation and it's not going to work for our kids or grand-kids short of some massive technological regression. So lets try and make a system that actually can work.
edit on 21-9-2014 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Aazadan

No one can refute the facts you present in your replys.



Many of us do refute his supposed facts. They are flawed and based upon a emotional theory. One that doesn't hold water in my opinion.

If his facts were actually true, then they would be reality.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:53 PM
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originally posted by: TDawgRex
Many of us do refute his supposed facts. They are flawed and based upon a emotional theory. One that doesn't hold water in my opinion.

If his facts were actually true, then they would be reality.


What did I write that was based on emotion? What did I write that was untrue?



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I'll give you the the developed nations declining birthrate. But they are still exploiting other nations aren't they? I think that we are actually making the movie "Ideocracy" a reality. It's only a matter of time before it actually happens between this battle of the haves and have nots. Guess who'll be one the losing end?

But the end result? We'll still have idiots inhabiting the world.
edit on 21-9-2014 by TDawgRex because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I know I made a thread about this recently.

We need a new social structure.

In fact I've been talking abo this a lot lately.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:58 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Aazadan

I know I made a thread about this recently.

We need a new social structure.

In fact I've been talking abo this a lot lately.


Though I'm sure it would be lengthy, I'd like to challenge you to put it down and post it. I'm sure it would be an enjoyable debate.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:02 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

I too have written papers on a Word Processor, nothing fancy just my grade school stuff but I learned to read at 2 years old and by three I was capable of using a computer/modem going onto BBS's, and typing what I'm sure I thought were important thoughts worthy of sharing on the considerably less vast internet we had back in the mid-late 80's. I learned to type before I learned to write the alphabet with a pencil.


I stopped eating crayons when I turned 50.


I'm familiar with the concept of adaptation, and that leads me to why I believe our current economic system is broken. On another forum one of my predictions for the future is that of robots taking over the service industry, I often write about robot waiters and what that is going to do to our unemployment rate. These stories come out of China all the time, they are pushing hard into the robotics industry, here's an example of one story, sorry it's a video but it's very recent. We have exported our skilled labor jobs in favor of largely low skill service sector jobs that can and will be automated. In another thread recently there was talk of a machine that makes burgers at McDonalds, it removes the fry cook, burger flipper, and burger manufacturer replacing them with a single machine. That's a reduction in McDonalds labor of around 60%, these robot waiters reduce the labor in a restaurant by 80%.


So you predict robots will take over the service industry. Adapt. (don't go into the service industry)


Regardless of what we pay people these machines WILL replace humans because no human even in third world countries can work for a wage of 1 cent/hour. What is going to happen to our real unemployment rate when these things start becoming more widespread? We can count ourselves lucky in the US so far that despite being a tech leader we haven't adopted these things. Within a decade they will likely be here, 15 years if we're slow to adopt. We must have an educated work force in order to provide jobs for people when the next round of the automation revolution happens. But on top of that we must have jobs for those educated workers too. What we've done is export the real jobs, and replaced them with jobs that we're going to soon be automating.


If you are so sure of this future, then get ahead of the curve.

Adapt, adjust, overcome.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Here's the sticky wicket. There is literally nothing that tech cannot do, that humans once did. It can kill, it can create life, it can do surgeries, it can grow crops and harvest them, etc, etc, etc.

It's only a matter of time before AI supplants us. Then where will we be with our minimum wage arguments as we fight legions of T-1000's?


They even take selfies!


edit on 21-9-2014 by TDawgRex because: Just a ETA



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: TDawgRex

I have to go through some of my older threads to find them.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:15 PM
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originally posted by: TDawgRex
a reply to: Aazadan

I'll give you the the developed nations declining birthrate. But they are still exploiting other nations aren't they? I think that we are actually making the movie "Ideocracy" a reality. It's only a matter of time before it actually happens between this battle of the haves and have nots. Guess who'll be one the losing end?

But the end result? We'll still have idiots inhabiting the world.


I never watched Idiocracy, though I'm familiar with the premise I happen to disagree. I agree that people are becoming less and less understanding of how the world works, but where I disagree is that that's a sign we're becoming dumber. Rather it's a sign that the population is becoming more highly specialized which is the result of greater education. Often times you don't need to know how something works in order to use it. I can't build an automobile engine without some documentation, others can't build a computer or write software.

We only appear to be getting dumber because each device requires more specialized knowledge to construct and use but the fact that we've been able to create these devices which are very complex is proof that we're not dumbing down.

When it comes to exploiting nations we are but as I said I believe that's a problem that will solve itself through increased automation. Rome had to import slaves in order to keep the fires running that powered the baths and warm running water. These days we use a furnace and a water tower that's maintained by an electric pump. If textiles were made today using the same process as in 1890 how many more people would be exploited? Automation cuts down on this significantly.

As far as the battle between the haves and have nots, the have nots usually have very bloody victories and we're on the course for that to once again happen. That's why I think it's important that we recognize the issues and their underlying causes now so that we can address the problems. Income inequality, wage stagnation, unemployment, education debt, and so on. As a nation we need to fix these issues, the last thing we need as a country is to have a bunch of highly educated people with no hope for the future and a bunch of time on their hands... that's the perfect storm to cause really bad things.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Oh c'mon...where's your sense of humor. I'm sure that even you can see the path we are on. Even though it is dark humor, the only path that we tread that makes us equal is our own death.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:24 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer
I stopped eating crayons when I turned 50.


The purple crayons taste the best. It's like a big waxy grape.


So you predict robots will take over the service industry. Adapt. (don't go into the service industry)


I don't plan to, what I'm working towards is starting my own software company. Whether I'm one of the lucky few that succeeds in this is besides the point though. Most people won't succeed in their own business, there's many reasons for this and some are very valid, the one I'll choose to go with though is that businesses need employees in order to expand. Some jobs are just too much for a single person... we can't all be the chief.

When businesses fail people still need an employer, however here in the US we've outsourced the jobs these people can goto, what they've been replaced with is service sector jobs. Saying don't go into the service industry is great individual advice, but many people will still have to do it and that means many people are going to see their jobs disappear, with no other jobs to take their place.


If you are so sure of this future, then get ahead of the curve.

Adapt, adjust, overcome.


I'm doing my part, I'm learning what I need in order to create my own company so that I can employ a few people in skilled labor positions. Being ahead of the curve in this instance means recognizing that we need to bring real jobs back to the country and that means we either need people to step up and create jobs or we need legislation that convinces companies to move jobs back over here. Preferably both.
edit on 21-9-2014 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: beezzer




So you predict robots will take over the service industry. Adapt. (don't go into the service industry)


your solution is to adapt...really...you are really behind the times old mate....


Service industries account for 68 percent of U.S. GDP and four out of five U.S. jobs.

www.ustr.gov...

adapt how ? what are you saying the new generations are responsible for creating new jobs ?.....i think Aazadan is quite right in saying we need a new system before this one goes belly up ...

we are looking at a system where 4 out of 5 jobs are in the service industry...so that is 80% leaving 20% of jobs in other fields...



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan




As far as the battle between the haves and have nots, the have nots usually have very bloody victories and we're on the course for that to once again happen. That's why I think it's important that we recognize the issues and their underlying causes now so that we can address the problems. Income inequality, wage stagnation, unemployment, education debt, and so on. As a nation we need to fix these issues, the last thing we need as a country is to have a bunch of highly educated people with no hope for the future and a bunch of time on their hands... that's the perfect storm to cause really bad things.


Oh it think it's coming.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: beezzer

Why don't you just get rid of NAFTA? Just get the money out of politics.



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I'm not in that industry.

If we are to change it, we need to stop feeding the beast. Adapt by NOT following the trend and do something else. The US may be at 68% for the service industry, but is that the same for every other country?



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

This could be said of any generation...baby boomers, gen x, gen y... in the end, when they hit 35 reality sets in. When you have kids or go through divorce its no longer cool to "play by your own rules". Its cute when a generation thinks they're the first to rebel or refuse to play by the established rules. What you're seeing is their interpretation of the same thing everyone went through at that age. We all felt that way at one time or another, and sadly it goes away.

(and frankly, I don't think corporate cares...as far as I know, no one from my fortune 5 company is worrying about this)
edit on 21-9-2014 by okachobi because: addition



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