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Some odd rock tracks in the sand - again.

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posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:05 AM
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Still cannot post images to my upload area. Dont know why. Maybe someone can post this image below so that others can see it please.



Out on a limb again, I think these rocks have been having a party. Two out of the three tracks made by 'rocks' appear to have moved in a sliding motion rather than a rolling way. I am familiar with a rolling rock track and the one at the top looks more like this - where the track is well defined but has the irregular shape of the rock embedded in the track as it has rolled down the slope.

Also I would say the three rocks at the bottom left appear more like furry rabbits or gophers to me as they look very similar if you examine them close up. I have seen rabbits sitting out in a field and they all sit in a particular way.

Official image

What could cause these rock-tracks which we have seen before on ATS. Maybe it is the wind again? Maybe it is just my imagination?




posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: qmantoo

there are small dust storms on mars, due to it's thin atmosphere, and with that small rocks are moved. that's pretty much the explanation



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: qmantoo

The same phenomena has been spotted in Death Valley. Apparently a fine film of moisture and strong winds can slowly propel a stone and the 'tracks' are the results of this movement.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:20 AM
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Here is the original image:



I'm looking, but I'm failing to see any tracks make by rocks.

I'm seeing cracks and weathering.

Is this the right image?



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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What I find curious and have not seen an explanation for is, how did the boulders form? The landscape is replete with boulders and rocks. These usually come from much larger rock formations that have fractured due to a force, that being tectonic or from water. How did all these boulders and rocks form on Mars? Something just seems odd about that landscape.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 10:31 AM
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I see cracks in the bedrock, rather than boulder trails.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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Cracks do not end with a rock. Cracks in bedrock would soon get covered by the light winds blowing dust particles around. These tracks have a rock at the end of each.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 10:52 AM
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originally posted by: qmantoo
Cracks do not end with a rock. Cracks in bedrock would soon get covered by the light winds blowing dust particles around. These tracks have a rock at the end of each.

The only thing I see is the large rock in the foreground at the bottom left-hand corner, and it has no track, although further back and behind is a wind track..but the two are not connected.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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originally posted by: qmantoo
Cracks do not end with a rock. Cracks in bedrock would soon get covered by the light winds blowing dust particles around. These tracks have a rock at the end of each.


Uhm, yes they do.

If a rock happens to be sitting in front of the end of a crack, it most certainly can end with a rock.

Cracks can fill in with dust. Cracks can also have dust blown out of them.

Nothing is static on a surface that has weather.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 11:44 AM
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originally posted by: Bilk22
What I find curious and have not seen an explanation for is, how did the boulders form? The landscape is replete with boulders and rocks. These usually come from much larger rock formations that have fractured due to a force, that being tectonic or from water. How did all these boulders and rocks form on Mars? Something just seems odd about that landscape.


Yes, I have wondered the same thing.
On earth, the layer in rocks usually indicates sand, or sediments, put down during different wet periods between which each layer is allowed to harden, by the sun and wind.
I don't know if this same actions were ever present on Mars, but it does look interesting.
Large boulders are likely the results of volcanic action or very thick layers of sedimentary stone braking up.
Eiter way it still looks a lot like the same things which have going on here on earth for a long time.

Maybe these are really pictures of desert areas on earth, with tinted lens, and they never sent anything to Mars.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: teamcommander

The Gale crater where Curiosity is used to be a large lake, and many rocks there have been shown to be sedimentary or formed in the presence of water. Add to that wind erosion, quakes, and meteorite strikes, and you get lots of broken rocks and boulders everywhere.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Agreed. Small cracks in the substrate, filled in by dust. Definitely not tracks formed by the rock.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 04:23 PM
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It's been surmised that there was a planet (Tiamat) that was where the asteroid belt is now; that it blew up and scoured the half of the Martian surface that was facing it at the time. If you look at a photo of Mars, it sure looks like half of it was bombed and the other half wasn't.

It's the best explanation for the asteroid belt I can think of; it being an 'unformed planet' doesn't hold water IMHO. This is a great photo; I'd love other people's ideas about what it looks like happened here... including the black 'smoke' looking appearances on half of it.

Mars Picture
edit on 152749pmSaturdayf27Sat, 20 Sep 2014 16:27:15 -0500America/Chicago by signalfire because: added picture



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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Electric universe theory postulates that the upper hemisphere of Mars experienced a massive plasma glow discharge event in the early history of the solar system. This plasma event caused excavation of huge amounts of material distributed around the planet, which can be seen as large areas of boulders and rocks strewn about the surface.

I haven't seen many Mars surface images that don't have boulders scattered everywhere.
edit on 20-9-2014 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: teamcommander

The Gale crater where Curiosity is used to be a large lake, and many rocks there have been shown to be sedimentary or formed in the presence of water. Add to that wind erosion, quakes, and meteorite strikes, and you get lots of broken rocks and boulders everywhere.
Now how do they know it was a large lake? LOL



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: Bilk22

Because sedimentary layers form in bodies of water. The sedimentary layers of Gale Crater were observed from orbit. That is one of the primary reasons it was chosen as the landing site for the MSL in relation to its mission of learning if conditions on Mars in the past were suitable for life. An ancient lake would be a good place to look.
cosmicdiary.org...

edit on 9/20/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 08:11 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Bilk22

Because sedimentary layers form in bodies of water. The sedimentary layers of Gale Crater were observed from orbit. That is one of the primary reasons it was chosen as the landing site for the MSL in relation to its mission of learning if conditions on Mars in the past were suitable for life. An ancient lake would be a good place to look.
cosmicdiary.org...
Yes but how do they know they're "sedimentary layers" and that they're "sedimentary layers" from a lake? What proof is there that water existed on Mars?



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: Bilk22
A student of geology are you not, see I.

I suppose those silly geologists who carefully studied the orbital image were just imagining things or are stupid or are deluded. I suppose you have a better explanation for such extensive and even layering.

edit on 9/20/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 11:57 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Bilk22
A student of geology are you not, see I.

I suppose those silly geologists who carefully studied the orbital image were just imagining things or are stupid or are deluded. I suppose you have a better explanation for such extensive and even layering.
It was a legitimate question. Here's another, where did the H2O go? If it evaporated, wouldn't it reside in the atmosphere?



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 01:12 AM
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a reply to: Bilk22
Good question.
Much of it was dragged into interplanetary space along with most of the atmosphere.
A lot of it is probably lying frozen underground.


edit on 9/21/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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