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In search of a Linux OS...

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posted on Sep, 19 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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originally posted by: jrod
a reply to: AllSourceIntel

The onion...not really sure about how secure. I'm guessing they call it the onion because of the layers of security, like an onion.

I've been slacking and a bit behind the geek world in terms of computer stuff. I've had enough of windows and issues I really dont like about it. I like to be in control of my machine.


Ok. While good and still more secure than a standard browser if used properly, be advised the alphabet soup is setting up many nodes to catch the traffic, the onion still needs way more users and nodes to be used in its best means and intention. Also, be sure to read their disclaimers. If you are using flash/java/etc applications you essentially void your security and anonymity, same goes with if you log into something with real credentials like your bank. Never use the onion at the same time you are using a standard browser.




posted on Sep, 19 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: Maxatoria

I am not sure that will be much help. I do not like to disclose too much on a public forum. Besides, most tech savy guys and girls will laugh at what I am using:

Intel N270 processor, 1 gig of ram, about 250gb of hard drive.

Pretty basic. The more basic the better. Just trying to see what works for everyone else. I am not interested in something that is similar to windows. I'd prefer to start basic and if necessary work my way up.
edit on 19-9-2014 by jrod because:




posted on Sep, 19 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: Maxatoria
Unless you are a tech genius I don't think you can get any more nuts and bolts or secure as Tails ... but I am not expert either, just know a little here and there.



posted on Sep, 19 2014 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: AllSourceIntel

That is good to know. I am learning a little more each day. It is obvious that FB and gmail do not like when someone connects via the onion.

I just feel like my windows OS leaves me extremely vulnerable. That is the main reason I want a different OS.



posted on Sep, 19 2014 @ 05:09 PM
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also depends on how much 'weird' stuff you use. For a lot of them the Windows versions works OK, but the Linux versions are either not available or very buggy at the least, and not all of them have source code available to just 'quickly' recompile. Sometimes a Linux guru would show you a couple of command lines to do something that you have been trying for weeks to get right, but those gurus are not always available ..... but of course, the same applies to Windows. I have Ubuntu on all my machines, but a lot of my compilers,emulators, or devices works only under windows, so I keep on using windows as a main system.



posted on Sep, 19 2014 @ 06:06 PM
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Everyone has favorites. I've used most of the mainstream ones and the 2 that are rock solid. I always keep 2 burnt off copies of the latest OPs for, and that are good, stable and rock overall: pclinuxos (first favorite) and mint linux (second but they're actually neck and neck).
Prefer KDE as well, for both.
edit on 19-9-2014 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2014 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: jrod

With that hardware and your weird desire for control you owe it to yourself to install Arch i686. It might take you a couple of tries to get it precisely the way that you want it, but you'll get it.

Mint and Ubuntu are too bloated for that machine.




posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: Bybyots
Yeah, I'm going to have to agree. You want something as slim as possible. Arch is more complex to install I believe but Bybyots would know more than I. I do know they have a great wiki taking you through step-by-step.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: AllSourceIntel

Yeah, it is more complex for sure. But that's only because it requires a very thorough knowledge of the basics.

The upshot is that a person does not really need to come to the table with that knowledge; Arch provides it.

At the end of getting it right, the complexity will suddenly shrink and the user will feel more competent than ever before and have total control over his/her machine.

I would be happy to stay on the hook for the less than pleasant Xserver config. and any other questions.

I'm interested because the OP has a perfect machine for Arch. Lean and mean, secure and with the features one needs for ATSing.



P.S. It would be great to know right know what sort of graphics processing unit (GPU) is in the old thing as that might be one of the major bumps in the road; I'm assuming it's an integrated Intel chip.

edit on 20-9-2014 by Bybyots because: . : .



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: Bybyots
I've been mulling Arch for sometime. I like my Debian though (might as well go straight to the source right?), I just don't like how things are not as up-to-date, even if you use testing or sid sources list.

My laptop is not the best, a piece of a Dell, but it is pretty standard. I can't wait till I get a new one, probably from Novena.

How do you like Arch, rather, what do you see as having over Debian I guess?



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: AllSourceIntel

I really love Debian too, very much so, especially with KDE.

What I like the best about Arch is the control, I know where everything is because I put it there.

I also love the ABS (Arch Build System) that allows me to have much more control over what packages I install and it allows me to compile them from source simply and elegantly.

For instance, with the ABS I am able to have just the parts of KDE that I want and none of the rest (which is a bunch).

Anyhow, not to get all long winded on that part, but I think it's safe to say Debian=stable, Arch=bleeding edge.

And since we are on the subject, I hope that folks aren't using Kali as thier desktop machine; it's neat, and all, but you are probably running arpound with your ass hanging out and don't realize it.




edit on 20-9-2014 by Bybyots because: . : .



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: Bybyots
For instance, with the ABS I am able to have just the parts of KDE that I want and none of the rest (which is a bunch).

Anyhow, not to get all long winded on that part, but I think it's safe to say Debian=stable, Arch=bleeding edge.

I love KDE as well, but bloat has also been an issue for me. I don't want everything in KDE, I just a few things, primarily control and customization of my environment (I like how I can specify behaviour for specific windows or class) but I also like Kate and Dolphin with customization (nothing like tabbed and split txt editing and file browsing/searching).

Yeah, I want bleeding edge with a system that offers a good amount of stability, Arch seems to have that. I probably will not switch until I get a new pc.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: AllSourceIntel


You are really going to lkie the ABS and AUR.

Have fun.




posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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If you really want to be secure then go BSG style and keep your main machine off any external networks.

Contrary to what all the LInux fanboys will try and get you to believe some flavor of that OS or using TOR doesn't override the principals\flaws of the OSI model or 802.11. If people want to get your data bad enough and you are connected to an outside network then the possibility is there. Sure you can make it harder for people to do things but their is only 1 way to secure a computer.

Also your edge devices should be what determines your primary level of security. Set them up right and it doesn't matter if you are running OS/2 ..No one is getting at them. Too often people fall back on "omg im running Windows, im not secure" meanwhile their edge firewall has every port open.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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originally posted by: opethPA
If you really want to be secure then go BSG style and keep your main machine off any external networks.

True, but make sure said device does not have a microphone or camera attached, the air gap has and can be breeched this way.


Contrary to what all the LInux fanboys will try and get you to believe some flavor of that OS or using TOR doesn't override the principals\flaws of the OSI model or 802.11.

The appeal of Linux for security reasons has more to do with the fact malware/spyware/virus's are not generally geared toward Linux but incredibly so toward Windows and to a lesser extent Mac, though you can get these things with Linux, it is much harder and it is becoming more of a trend to develop malware/spyware/virus's for Linux. No device is 100% secure


If people want to get your data bad enough and you are connected to an outside network then the possibility is there. Sure you can make it harder for people to do things but their is only 1 way to secure a computer.

Very, very true and good point. The alphabet King can get to any computer, no matter what, if it is on, and they wanted to, and you are a target, they can get it.


Also your edge devices should be what determines your primary level of security. Set them up right and it doesn't matter if you are running OS/2 ..No one is getting at them. Too often people fall back on "omg im running Windows, im not secure" meanwhile their edge firewall has every port open.

Very, very true and good point. Make sure your modem/router limits connection via MAC address and blocks all others you do not physically give permission to, make sure you change the default password to get into settings and make it long, very long. Understand its settings.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 04:35 PM
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All I was going to suggest was that he turn off kerberos and ftp services, configure iptables correctly (which handles NAT and port issues) and not install JRE.

What's a BSG?

Thanks fellas.




posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 06:37 PM
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originally posted by: AllSourceIntel
True, but make sure said device does not have a microphone or camera attached, the air gap has and can be breeched this way.


Yup, just depends on what level of secure you want to take your gear to..


originally posted by: AllSourceIntel
The appeal of Linux for security reasons has more to do with the fact malware/spyware/virus's are not generally geared toward Linux but incredibly so toward Windows and to a lesser extent Mac, though you can get these things with Linux, it is much harder and it is becoming more of a trend to develop malware/spyware/virus's for Linux. No device is 100% secure


Agreed there also. Part of it is that Linux at its core is harder to exploit while a larger part is market share. If I was coding any ware for profit I'm going after the largest deployed target and that is still the WIndows OS by a large %. It's dwindling but it's still the best bang for the buck.

Agreed 100% on no device being secure.


originally posted by: AllSourceIntel
Very, very true and good point. The alphabet King can get to any computer, no matter what, if it is on, and they wanted to, and you are a target, they can get it.


Yup...If you want something secure keep it offline as that is about the only way to guarantee anything. If you want a good place to start..fire up wireshark or your packet tracer of choice (will need something different for 802.11 unless running in promiscuous mode) and see what is traveling your wires.


originally posted by: AllSourceIntel
Very, very true and good point. Make sure your modem/router limits connection via MAC address and blocks all others you do not physically give permission to, make sure you change the default password to get into settings and make it long, very long. Understand its settings.


Exactly. You would be amazed at how many people think "Oh yay, im TOR so Im safe" meanwhile their router password is still admin . Great post.


originally posted by: Bybyotsl
What's a BSG?

BSG = Battlestar Galactica.
In the 2004 version the captain of the ship did everything he could do to keep his ship off the fleet network so it couldn't be exploited.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: opethPA




BSG = Battlestar Galactica. In the 2004 version the captain of the ship did everything he could do to keep his ship off the fleet network so it couldn't be exploited.


LMAO. Thanks man! I was tooling around trying to figure it out and all I could come up with was Battlestar Galactica, thanks for making sense of it.




posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 08:37 PM
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originally posted by: opethPA
Exactly. You would be amazed at how many people think "Oh yay, im TOR so Im safe" meanwhile their router password is still admin . Great post.

We should add even if hardware and other software are configured correctly, one needs to have appropriate use practices that TOR themselves mention and warn its users about. I briefly covered this earlier in the thread ...

While good and still more secure than a standard browser if used properly, be advised the alphabet soup is setting up many nodes to catch the traffic, the onion still needs way more users and nodes to be used in its best means and intention. Also, be sure to read their disclaimers. If you are using flash/java/etc applications you essentially void your security and anonymity, same goes with if you log into something with real credentials like your bank. Never use the onion at the same time you are using a standard browser.



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: AllSourceIntel

Lol.

While I know my computer is not secure, I know the alphabet is way behind the geek world in terms of encryption and web security.

As far as I know, the onion is the most secure web browser available.

edit on 20-9-2014 by jrod because: a



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