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Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

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posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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So I am not sure if this topic fits here but a thought occurred to me. What if the children's rhyme Twinkle Twinkle was about UFO sightings/abductions? I will try to explain my imaginings line by line.

"Twinkle twinkle little star"
(Could be a stationary UFO)
"How I wonder what you are"
(lends to the idea of it being unidentified, people had general ideas of what stars were)
"Up above the world so high"
(flying object)
"Like a diamond in the sky"
(Never have I seen a diamond shaped star, but many diamond shaped UFO's have been witnessed throughout history)
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star"
"How I wonder what you are"


"When the blazing sun is gone"
"When he nothing shines upon"
(UFO's commonly appear at night)
"Then you show your little light"
(a beam of light accompanies abductions)
"Twinkle, twinkle, all the night"
(Again referencing the fact that most sightings are at night)
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star"
"How I wonder what you are"

"Then the traveler in the dark"
(Alien)
"Thanks you for your tiny spark"
(perhaps believing they took a bit of the abductee's life force)
"He could not see which way to go"
"If you did not twinkle so"
(possibly believing that some UFO's were a guiding light for travelers)
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star"
"How I wonder what you are"

"In the dark blue sky you keep"
(rarely do UFO's land)
"And often through my curtains peep"
(Abducted from their room)
"For you never shut your eye"
"Till the sun is in the sky"
(feeling of being watched)
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star"
"How I wonder what you are"

"As your bright and tiny spark"
"Lights the traveler in the dark"
(again alluding to seeing them as a guiding light)
"Though I know not what you are"
(again, unidentified)
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star"
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star"
"How I wonder what you are"

I realize it is a bit of a stretch but an amusing thought either way. Any other thoughts or interpretations are welcome and encouraged.




posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: Jekka

oh, that is CREEPY!!! ... I get shivers from mere thought... yak, awful



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 02:34 PM
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Very interesting... there's always a slight possibility that you're right. But will we ever know? Unfortunately not... back in the day humanity always watched the skies and it could be a plausible rhyme for these weird stars they saw, but in my honest opinion this was just a song someone wrote while they were staying into the nights sky wondering what a start really is and admiring its beauty



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 02:35 PM
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"This is how they translate old writings , each translation brings more weirdness ending with completely nonsense".


Funny, i like it...

edit on 17-9-2014 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 02:41 PM
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Here are some interesting facts about that rhyme:

It's original name is "The Star" and was written by Jane Taylor in 1806 in London, England. It was originally published by her and her sister, Ann Taylor, under "Rhymes For The Nursery". Jane Taylor was a poet and novelist.

The melody that it is sung to, is actually a french melody called: "Ah! vous dirais-je, Maman", and originated some time in the first half of the 1700's.

The melody it self has been used many times, the most famous of course is the English version of Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, but also the singing of the alphabet. A variation of the melody is used for Baa, Baa, Black Sheep.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart helped make the melody famous during his time, when in sometime around 1778, he wrote Twelve Variations on "Ah vous dirai-je, Maman".

We often think of this melody as very simple and easy to learn. However, I urge everyone to take just under 12 minutes to listen to what Mozart did with this. It's AMAZING. I first heard it when I was 13, as a friend in band who played the piano used to practice it.

Listen past 0:40, watch and listen as each variation becomes complex.


edit on 17-9-2014 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 02:53 PM
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You think that's creepy? Study the meaning of the words to "Ring Around the Rosey"



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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Well, I have to give you a star.

Because I didn't even know all those other verses existed.


Plus, I like the way you think!



posted on Sep, 18 2014 @ 12:24 AM
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originally posted by: AnonymousCitizen
You think that's creepy? Study the meaning of the words to "Ring Around the Rosey"


I KNOW!!!!!



posted on Sep, 18 2014 @ 12:29 AM
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a reply to: AnonymousCitizen
Yup the Black Plague...



posted on Sep, 18 2014 @ 02:45 AM
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a reply to: AnonymousCitizen

Funny how death and destruction gets put into kids rhymes.

Try London Bridge is falling down for a real mind flip.

@ the op... Interesting theory. I guess there would be room for a UFO or even an unexplained celestial event seeing as stars were known back then.

Off to do some research.



posted on Sep, 18 2014 @ 02:54 AM
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originally posted by: AnonymousCitizen
You think that's creepy? Study the meaning of the words to "Ring Around the Rosey"



You mean Ring o Ring of roses?
That's just bs, it was never about the plague at all - people just made that up half a century ago.
There's no truth in it being about the plague, but it does make a fun fact of general ignorance

www.snopes.com...

www.answers.com...
edit on 18-9-2014 by stargatetravels because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2014 @ 05:04 AM
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Perhaps it is simply the case that stars are abducting people...






posted on Sep, 18 2014 @ 08:39 AM
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Pretty awesome observation.
However, I only like the Andrew Dice Clay version of Twinkle Twinkle little star.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 04:44 PM
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Love the replies so far, even the skeptical ones. If there weren't skeptics in society we all wouldn't be here. Wasn't sure when it was written exactly but knowing the date validates that scientific hypotheses existed at the time as to what actual stars were. As aforementioned, it was just one of my many musings from day to day that I thought to put out there.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 04:59 PM
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This is very likely, since mind control programmers use children nursery rhymes for their purposes.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 05:05 PM
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fairy tales & nursery rhymes..
..what a rich & colorful medium
 

interesting stuff
(S&F'd)
(hadn't heard read all the other verses 'til just then..)
that bit on rianna/stars(abduction) says a lot also (in tinfoil lingo)

 

mary mary, quite contrary
how does your garden (kingdom) grow?
with silver bells (thumbscrews)
cockle-shells (ball-breakers)
and pretty maids all in a row (guillotines)



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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"Up the airy mountain,
down the rushy glen,
we daren't go a-hunting
for fear of little men"

The Fairies

Or, of course, the children's poem about alien abduction:

" An' thist as she kicked her heels, an' turn't to run an' hide,
They wuz two great big Black Things a-standin' by her side,
An' they snatched her through the ceilin' 'fore she knowed what she's about!
An' the Gobble-uns 'll git you
Ef you
Don't
Watch
Out!"

"Little Orphant Annie" James Whitcomb Riley



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