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“I Dealt **** as a Gangsta” High Ranking NYPD Cop Reveals his Criminal Past

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posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 10:48 AM
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Pegues retired from the force in April of 2013 after serving for 20 years on the NYPD rising through the ranks to become a deputy inspector awarded command of the 67th Precinct in East Flatbush. He receives a disability pension of $135,000 a year tax-free after falling off a chair, according to the NYPost. Read more at


135k a year? Man I work pretty damn hard to come close to 50, but hey I'm just a carpenter trying to keep my head above water in a down construction economy.



During the interview Pegues boasted that as a young man in Queens in the early 80s, he was a part of the feared “Supreme Team”, headed by crack kingpin Kenneth “Supreme” McGriff. McGriff was sentenced in federal court in 2007 to life without parole for drug trafficking, murder-for-hire, racketeering, and various other crimes.


Don't you think his name would have come up during the indictment?

How does someone like this slip through the cracks?

How is it that he's still aloud to collect?

How many other police officers are former gangsters or currently gangsters like this?




posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: onequestion


How does someone like this slip through the cracks?

Another good question is how did that dope dealer ply his "trade' for so long?

Protection. Its a two way street. Police corruption is as old as "Gangsta".

Ever see "Serpico" with Al Pacino?

Same s***, different day.

Also see "Casino" with Robert Dinero.

One can delve into the Chicago Mob and Al Capones influence on local law enforcement, judges and courts.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

im not sure if i really care what someone was doing 20 years ago.

I was hired to run a business several years back. The business was kind of a black tie type of place where it isn't uncommon to have full background checks for employees. Due to the location of this particular place, it wasn't feasible to be quite that picky.

I inherited a hispanic male employee who was in his late 30's. He was tatted from neck to fingertip. I noticed he was my best employee the first time I went to inspect his log books. He had the most meticulous and complete set of records of what he did that I have ever seen. He seriously could go and get some ISO training, and likely make a fortune as a consultant for standardization and documenation. I was shocked that a book with such a rough cover seemed to have it all together so well.

As I learned more about him, I discovered that he has spent almost 20 years in San Quentin for murder. He had killed someone as part of some gang activity. Upon hearing that, the tattoos made much more sense. Especially all the Aztlan tattoo's he had. He had moved here upon his release because his mom had died and left him a house.

I would employ him right now at my current business, but we have policies that forbid hiring felons. If i had the authority to overwrite that policy, I absolutely would. Because it is what is keeping me from the best employee I have ever had.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Don't you always cry when people can't get a second chance in life?

So what he was a punk kid but at some point in his life he decided to change his path and now your upset.

Me me me me.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: onequestion




135k a year? Man I work pretty damn hard to come close to 50, but hey I'm just a carpenter trying to keep my head above water in a down construction economy.



You make close to 50k a year in a trade and you made that baby boomer thread complaining about no jobs and hoping they drop dead so you can gain ground? I'm stumped man. Want to know how much I made in 2011? 11k. Last year was a little better.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: FlySolo

I didn't make that thread for myself I made it based on the observations of others around me.

but wahhhhhhhh I can't separate the issues and I'm sorry someone said something you didn't like.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: thesaneone

What are you talking about?
your ok with crack dealing cops working your streets?


We'll I don't want to live in your neighborhood.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

You're not making any sense. You made a 'rant' thread ranting about what others are ranting about?

I'm out of here.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: FlySolo

Obviously you didn't read my post.

Make whatever assumptions you want.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

We ALL read your post. You managed to get quite a thrashing in there too for your comments and now you're saying it's all out of context? You're lying about something.

Whatever.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:29 AM
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a reply to: FlySolo

Lying about what?

Go to the other thread this thread is about cops who are gangsters.


Stop making this about how you feel about something I said in another thread.

And if you've noticed my stance hasn't wavered. All I read is emotional responses and I don't see anyone but one person posting something substantiated by data that in fact supports my position.
edit on 9/12/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Greetings- Remove the fact that I'm medically retired "off the job" and I even get to pay $1207/month for "Health Insurance" for the broken back and neck I suffered fighting the 'War on Drugs' and am not even close to $135k/yr. pension. I'd opine that this gentleman got involved with some "double dipping" increasing His pension..

Any police department is better served if it is 'representative' of the community in which it serves. Who better than a 'crook' to nab a crook? Because this is the largest department, it is going to be riddled with more "8-balls", more folks that have a 'vendetta' this will be Your BIG RED TRUCK, 2" penis, got beat up in high school and now has a score to settle.. The ones on YouTube™ that always end up "stepping on their Johnson"

Want to know what is even worse? Before I worked for the Ca. multi-cultural, multi-ethnic community I worked at the Phederal (sp.? hahaha) level. These not only have the above attributes but they're "more intelligent" (easier to manipulate) I had to exit Stage Left after a BIG debacle in a famous canal city, down South...


As far as this 'turd/rat's name coming up at trial, it would be akin to the C.E.O. of BofA™ when caught defrauding the U.S. of $billion$$ mentions that cute teller at the local branch.. Good thing too, apparently this "true" can't hold His mud and I'd opine if He got pinched when He was dealing He'd be C.I. #NYPD-547..

When I got out of "Special Investigations" in 2003 I turned in My Nextel™ and haven't had a cellphone since. Would You like to know why? "Confidential Informants" 'rat' 'snitch' but the ones I "worked" with they would ingest stimulants and We'd play a game. They would 'page' Me at all hours of the night whispering in the phone "They know I told..." then they'd his Me up for $$$ to get a motel room. I'd go back to work on Tuesday and begin the 'game again'. I got older and the crook stayed the same age...

Background Investigator was probably "in the bag" and this makes a tough job even tougher. There is still some doing 'The Job' to make a 'positive' this isn't One of "them"

namaste



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

He probably deserves a second chance.

However this guy transitioned from dealer to cop with process in between.

Your friend payed the price and deserves it.

Here is the clear difference.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 12:22 PM
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I didn't think that former felons could become cops. That opens the door to corruption, IMO. I understand that people change and shouldn't keep getting convicted all their lives for a crime that they committed when they were young....but cops shouldn't let criminals in, former or current. That's just common sense. Oh, I forgot! Common sense rarely gets used these days by people in power.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 12:23 PM
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originally posted by: Fylgje
I didn't think that former felons could become cops. That opens the door to corruption, IMO. I understand that people change and shouldn't keep getting convicted all their lives for a crime that they committed when they were young....but cops shouldn't let criminals in, former or current. That's just common sense. Oh, I forgot! Common sense rarely gets used these days by people in power.


People in general.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I think we see things from two different perspectives.

Prison...is it a debt service? Or is it a rehab? Or both?

I am more concerned with someone not repeating the behavior in the future. My wife gets upset when I won't ground our kids for doing something that I know they regret, and I know they won't repeat. Punishment for the sake of punishment is sadism.

The bottom line on this story is, would the cop repeat the behavior? If he didn't act inappropriately while a cop, im not sure it matters much to me, other than maybe shining a light on the laughable hiring practices of US law enforcement.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan
We'll I can agree with that.

But should we let drug dealers become police officers?

Where do you draw the line?



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: Fylgje

Although the act was "felonious" in nature, He never got caught.. He probably omitted this info from the background investigator and if He didn't, then it would prove that 'due diligence' was NOT done during the background.. I know I didn't pass One background for a P.D. because the 'drunk' running the polygraph accused Me of being a "middle man" for a deal. I had couriered some medicine for an AIDS patient because I was in the front seat and I ran it in to the guy on the way to go fishing. If I were sitting in the backseat, it wouldn't have happened and if I didn't tell Vodka Vic I would've passed...
Ironically, another guy who was failed by the same guy, got hired at the same P.D. as Me and We ended up partnering when We went to a 2-person unit. He is now a Sgt.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I have known a lot of folks who dealt a few drugs here and there in their youth.

If a person has no convictions, then I say hire away.

ETA: i should point out my own hiring standards: I mentioned i don't hire with a felony history. By the same token, if you have more than 1 or 2 misdemeanors i won't hire you either. The guy with 3 convictions for possession of pot, while I could care less what they do, indicates a series of poor decisions. A series of poor decisions indicates a habit of making poor decisions. THAT is contraindicative of employment. Unless those convictions were 10 years ago, and you are squeaky clean since then, anyway.
edit on 9/12/2014 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Do you hire divorced people? someone with 3 divorces indicates a series of poor decisions.



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