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Airglow Ripples Mark Atmosphere With A Bullseye

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posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:56 PM
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Once again nature unleashes it's beauty and it was captured by one lucky photographer.

What you see below is called Airglow Ripples. These ripples captures look eerily similar to a bullseye...


Following a severe thunderstorm over Bangladesh in late April, Jeff Dai captured these stunning photos of giant circular ripples of glowing air in the night sky while he was on the Tibet Plateau of China. Standing about 4,450 meters (14,600 feet) above sea level, the Chongqing, China-based creative was able to get a clear view of the breathtakingly luminescent, multihued bullseye shape overhead.




I would absolutely agree that it's breathtakingly luminescent and beautiful. I'm one of those people that is always looking up. You never know what you're going to miss when you start forgetting to take a minute and look at the landscape above you. Some of the artwork up there runs the gambit from tear jerking awe to hella scary IMO.

So what cause Airglow Ripples?? I mean... If you are asking the same thing I did of course. I'm sure some of you fine folks already know what it is. To those like me -


The unusual pattern is created by atmospheric gravity waves, waves of alternating air pressure that can grow with height as the air thins, in this case about 90 kilometers up. Unlike auroras powered by collisions with energetic charged particles and seen at high latitudes, airglow is due to chemiluminescence, the production of light in a chemical reaction. More typically seen near the horizon, airglow keeps the night sky from ever being completely dark.




Both photos are simply stunning...

We all know how powerful nature is, but it's literally something different to see how a storm could shake up the atmosphere on that grand a scale.

You can read more here -
www.mymodernmet.com...

I like it when I learn something new everyday!

ETA - After looking for a bit, I found a 3second exposure photo of our atmosphere taken by the ISS minus the ripples.




It’s one thing to visualize different layers of gasses in the Earth’s atmosphere and see drawings and models in a book or online… it’s another thing entirely to capture it on camera. But of course, that’s one of the perks of being an astronaut on the International Space Station, you get to do a whole lot of things that are “another thing entirely.”

The photograph above was taken by astronaut Reid Wiseman and uploaded to his Twitter feed early this morning. It’s a 3-second exposure, and we know this because he captioned the photo “3 second shutter exposure at night shows how crazy our #atmosphere really is.”


Link for the above pic... petapixel.com...
edit on 9/10/2014 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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That is stunning. Never heard of airglow ripples, time for some research.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 12:12 AM
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originally posted by: 024nona
That is stunning. Never heard of airglow ripples, time for some research.


I had never heard of it either until I saw this article. That's one of the main reasons I shared it.


I figured more people out there hadn't heard of it or seen it either. Life moves by so fast, sometimes we miss the most simple, beautiful things right in front of us. I try to share what brings a smile to my face and helps me learn something new.

I'm glad you like it.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 12:21 AM
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Beautiful picture! It would make a nice avatar with the ground equipment and sky together. Hmmm...


Airglow (also called nightglow) is the very weak emission of light by a planetary atmosphere. In the case of Earth's atmosphere, this optical phenomenon causes the night sky never to be completely dark, even after the effects of starlight and diffused sunlight from the far side are removed.

A sky filled with stars is 10 times brighter with airglow than without it. Interesting...


Airglow is caused by various processes in the upper atmosphere, such as the recombination of atoms, which were photoionized by the sun during the day, luminescence caused by cosmic rays striking the upper atmosphere and chemiluminescence caused mainly by oxygen and nitrogen reacting with hydroxyl ions at heights of a few hundred kilometres. It is not noticeable during the daytime because of the scattered light from the sun.

Blah, Blah, Blah...

The perfect image to have in my head before off to bed.

S+F


edit on 10-9-2014 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 12:26 AM
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Great thread! Where do these gases (spelling) come from?



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 12:44 AM
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Just found this. "The Earth's atmosphere is a thin layer of gases that surrounds the Earth. It composed of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 0.9% argon, 0.03% carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of other gases. This thin gaseous layer insulates the Earth from extreme temperatures; it keeps heat inside the atmosphere and it also blocks the Earth from much of the Sun's incoming ultraviolet radiation.

The Earth's atmosphere is about 300 miles (480 km) thick, but most of the atmosphere (about 80%) is within 10 miles (16 km) of the surface of the Earth. There is no exact place where the atmosphere ends; it just gets thinner and thinner, until it merges with outer space." Source www.enchantedlearning.com...



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 01:14 AM
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Wow..
That's just beautiful!
I have no words....
Thanks.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 01:25 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Thanks for the extra info eisegesis.
I'm glad you enjoyed it and hope it gave you some peaceful, pleasant dreams.



originally posted by: 024nona
Just found this. "The Earth's atmosphere is a thin layer of gases that surrounds the Earth. It composed of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 0.9% argon, 0.03% carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of other gases. This thin gaseous layer insulates the Earth from extreme temperatures; it keeps heat inside the atmosphere and it also blocks the Earth from much of the Sun's incoming ultraviolet radiation.

The Earth's atmosphere is about 300 miles (480 km) thick, but most of the atmosphere (about 80%) is within 10 miles (16 km) of the surface of the Earth. There is no exact place where the atmosphere ends; it just gets thinner and thinner, until it merges with outer space." Source www.enchantedlearning.com...


Thanks for that!
I see you got your answer before I got back to you.

A true ATS'er for sure!



originally posted by: Bigburgh
Wow..
That's just beautiful!
I have no words....
Thanks.


None needed...
edit on 9/10/2014 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: Kangaruex4Ewe
S & F, Just Beautiful, WoW
Just WoW Imagine how lucky this photographer was to be in the right place in Tibet, in China, My Home Land as Large as Tibet is, Just Amazingly Lucky.

Tibet is 965,000 sq mi, Now That's BIG! Most people don't know that.
If you don't mind, I'd like to attach a video called the Tibetan Sky.
It is 10 minutes and will show you Tibet and the Sky.
I hope you don't mind, because then I think your reading of this article may get a better idea of Just How Vast Tibet really is.

OH, Expatt888, Charles and the rest all miss you in Hernando's Hideaway

I danced with Expat last night, he stepped on my feet,,, But you're all welcome!
The drinks are on the House!



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 01:42 AM
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a reply to: guohua

You know I don't mind at all you sharing that video. I am endlessly fascinated with this little chunk of dirt we live on and the skies that blanket us as well. Anything that adds to that is always more than welcome.



OT - I forgot about the hideaway! I'll have to venture back over.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 01:44 AM
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From www2.ucar.edu... ON UPPER ATMOSPHERE

April 30, 2012
BOULDER--Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and other organizations are targeting thunderstorms in Alabama, Colorado, and Oklahoma this spring to discover what happens when clouds suck air up from Earth’s surface many miles into the atmosphere.
thunderstrom
Thunderstorms, such as this one in eastern Colorado, can affect the atmosphere for many miles. (Photo by Bob Henson.)
The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment, which begins the middle of this month, will explore the influence of thunderstorms on air just beneath the stratosphere, a little-explored region that influences Earth’s climate and weather patterns. Scientists will use three research aircraft, mobile radars, lightning mapping arrays, and other tools to pull together a comprehensive picture.
“We tend to associate thunderstorms with heavy rain and lightning, but they also shake things up at the top of cloud level,” says NCAR scientist Chris Cantrell, a DC3 principal investigator. “Their impacts high in the atmosphere have effects on climate that last long after the storm dissipates.”

Interesting that thunderstorms have an impact high up in the atmosphere. Opens many questions for me.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 04:15 AM
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Saw this on Netflix a couple nights ago. Lots of awesome information on the glow and Sprites. Super cool stuff! Nova Sprites



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 08:13 AM
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originally posted by: PlasticWizard
Saw this on Netflix a couple nights ago. Lots of awesome information on the glow and Sprites. Super cool stuff! Nova Sprites


Definitely so,etching I am going to check out. Thanks for that!


I can't get enough of this kind of stuff and I think I've almost run out of decent Netflix material.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 04:18 AM
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a reply to: Kangaruex4Ewe

My pleasure! I'm the same way! I've been seeing more science and space stuff popping up lately. Hopefully they continue the trend!




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