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General Mills Buys Annie's for $820 Million Cash

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posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 03:12 AM
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I wish I had stock in Annies. They'll be through the roof soon.




posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 07:46 AM
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Historically, this is how it goes.

When faced with competition, buying out upcoming companies is just one tool. I am guessing Annie's knew this. If they refused a monetary offer, they most likely would have faced other methods. Legal wrangling, supply issues, hostile takeover (if public), etc.

Giant corporations did not get that way because their products are awesome and they care.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 07:59 AM
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I've never forgiven General Mills for discontinuing Peanut Butter Boppers in 1986.

Whoever made that decision is the worst kind of evil the world has ever seen.
edit on 10-9-2014 by Junkheap because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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all the small organic foods companies are slowly being bought by the big corporate conglomerates.......which are like politicians.....cant trust them...



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 10:54 AM
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I want to see them use that money to make an even better line!

Annie's is one of the few brands that doesn't play an ingredient game. If you have allergies the box tells you if it's safe to eat. General Mills not so much.

I certainly don't enjoy paying $5 for a tofu pot pie though. I hope this means the prices come down at the very leeast.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 11:24 AM
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When I first heard this news last night I was so bummed I planned on going to Safeway with a bunch of sticky notes that say General Mills, and sticking them under the Annie's products. (is that lame?) cause I still might do it.

Just like the OP our pantry had a lot of Annie's snacks for our little one. I'm into feeding my kid healthy food instead of poison.

Everytime we purchase something we are voting, and I for one will not be buying ANY Annie's from now on.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 11:28 AM
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originally posted by: ABNARTY
Historically, this is how it goes.

When faced with competition, buying out upcoming companies is just one tool. I am guessing Annie's knew this. If they refused a monetary offer, they most likely would have faced other methods. Legal wrangling, supply issues, hostile takeover (if public), etc.

Giant corporations did not get that way because their products are awesome and they care.


Yep, this is very true and I'd say a really large part of the problem with way the marketing is functioning today. My family business refused buyout and was ground into the dirt by inescapable, increased supply costs, lawsuits and more. How they get away with it is pretty simple. The FTC doesn't see anything wrong with 5 companies dominating a market. That is still competition in their book even though 5 major market share holders creates severe market entry barriers, vendor supply issues, and more.

How bad as it? As an accountant, one of the things that I've been trained to is to read 10-k's. Consolidation has grown so large for these mega corporations that they are no longer required to file reports for all of their holdings on this SEC filed annual report in the consolidated financial reporting section. It was found to be too overwhelming to actually break out all the holdings and would create a situation of taking the 10-k from being compact to it being hundreds and hundreds of pages.

There's no better place to actually view this in effect than in the food market. Con Agra, Kellogg, General Mills, and Kraft are the major companies that dominate every sub-market of the overall food market and much of what is on the shelves of that typical grocery store is going to be one of those with smaller dominating corps in the submarkets. So Heinz is going to still dominate in the condiment aisle or Hormel in the meat. Coke and Pepsi in the beverage and snack aisles. You walk down the cookie aisle and see a whole variety of cookies but guess what--that's just because they retained that all important brand name. Mother's cookies? That's owned by Kelloggs. Pepperidge Farm cookies? lol, that's owned by Campbell Soup. Nabisco cookies? Well that was picked up by Kraft and Phillip Morris--yes, the tobacco company. They merged it into Kraft Food, Inc.

It's just ridiculous, sometimes weird, and pretty depressing. This is the crap that they expect us to eat.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 11:35 AM
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originally posted by: GoShredAK
When I first heard this news last night I was so bummed I planned on going to Safeway with a bunch of sticky notes that say General Mills, and sticking them under the Annie's products. (is that lame?) cause I still might do it.

Just like the OP our pantry had a lot of Annie's snacks for our little one. I'm into feeding my kid healthy food instead of poison.

Everytime we purchase something we are voting, and I for one will not be buying ANY Annie's from now on.


I think that's hilarious but make sure to write the post its ahead of time and work quick if you do it, lol. They might throw you out of the store though if you're caught (and there are cameras). Additionally, if they do catch you, there is a patent that's been out for years that utilizes biometric/facial recognition on customers in a store and, once identified, they pit the person against a database of information about that individual in a "customer risk assessment". Sounds weird but depending on the outcome, the store will pretty much attempt to do mild psychological torture (automated) or show you good deals. One of the items in that risk assessment IS complaints against the store. Sounds insane but the system was patented by IBM inventors several years ago. Whether it ever gets implemented or not is hard to say but I figure you should be informed.

www.google.com...



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

Awesome, thank you for the heads up, and crazy info I was unaware of.

Oh I'm going full on covert 007 mode when I do this. I'll be nothing more than a breeze through the organics aisle. A post-it note ninja, fully equipped and with a cause.

The only shred of evidence to exist is written here.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 02:40 PM
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Perhaps it is a mistake to attempt to separate companies such as these in the first place. If there is a demand for anything, including organic foods, that demand is likely to be filled by someone, including a large corporation. The fact that a company such as Annie's would in fact sell their business to a larger business like GM might suggest that they too were motivated by money. All businesses are motivated by money, and my point is that the sellers of organic foods are in it to make a buck like everyone else. Now if all of the organic food disappeared that is another story altogether imo. I suppose it also depends on what changes are made. If the product stays the way it is, then there really is no difference in the product...Now the OP's drive not to give money to big businesses, while I can understand, could be viewed as misguided considering, as I said, that all businesses are generally motivated by the same thing. And even if the founder of a business intended it to be run a certain way, this can easily change once that person no longer has control. So I completely get what you're saying with this thread, and I just wanted to point out that there are other ways of looking at it.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: JiggyPotamus

I'm afraid it's inevitable for the quality of the product to suffer now. Annie's will still be touted as organic, but under the ownership of general mills, surely the cheapest genetically modified ingredients will be used.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

Sorry to hear about your family business.

Sounds like you have plenty of experience with this then. I am simply guessing Annie's saw the writing on the wall.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 04:51 PM
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originally posted by: ABNARTY
a reply to: WhiteAlice

Sorry to hear about your family business.

Sounds like you have plenty of experience with this then. I am simply guessing Annie's saw the writing on the wall.


It's okay and probably. One of my friends is involved with a lot of tech startups and, sad to say, he's looking at each as not being something that he'll be in charge of from beginning to end but something somebody is going to eventually snap up. I think it really spells the end of family owned businesses to be honest when it's no longer about passing the business along to the next generation who grew up with the ideals behind the business and how much you can get for it in 10 years.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

Annie's has lots more then Mac & Cheese - mostly kid friendly products.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 04:38 AM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd
a reply to: kosmicjack

Annie's has lots more then Mac & Cheese - mostly kid friendly products.



Yep. My youngest loves their crackers (though she's grown out of the bunny shaped ones) and their fruit snack gummy things. Large line of products actually.




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