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posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 06:22 PM
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This if for all the freemasons on the board. Why did you join the freemasons?




posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 07:38 PM
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I was friends with several people who were. I got involved in doing the things we do before I actually joined. It made sense after I was helping with breakfasts, the circus, or other projects.

Since then, I haven't looked back. My life is better for what the Lodge means to me. I am a better person because I feel I have made even a small difference in the quality of life....for myself...but more importantly, for the that bit of charitable help my efforts have given others.

One of the "secrets" of being a Freemason can be the person you make of yourself. But that's as secret as you want it to be...

Michael



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by Ruffy
This if for all the freemasons on the board. Why did you join the freemasons?


Well to start I did not join the freemasons, I joined Freemasonry.


How to start... I found a book one day "Behold a Pale White Horse" or something like that, it was completely anti-mason, but it peaked my interest. So I started to buy books on Freemasonry, starting with anti-mason books and working to pro-mason books. After about two years of reading I wanted to meet with a real Freemason, so I droped by my local Lodge and was greeted by a very kind man, he took the time to talkto me for about an hour or so and then I set up another appointment when he had more time to talk. I went to see him again and he told me that I needed to be 21 to become a Freemason but I could read all about it and gave the names of a couple of books. When I turned 21 the Freemason that I had talked to was no longer employed at the Freemason Convention Center, and I had no other means of contacting him, so I carried on with my studies and bumped into a couple of very nice Freemasons in book stores and talk with each of them for quite a while but I keeped forgetting to get phone numbers do to the fact I was on lunch and well I had to run off back to work. After about another year I contacted a local Lodge again and went for a tour of the temple and I also went to a Christmas party, there were to many people for my liking so I disided to wait a bit and find a different Lodge to join. So another two years latter I bumped into a Freemason (Shriner) out side my local grocery store, the man was sooo nice, we talked for about two hours and he answered most of my questions that I had, he also mentioned his Lodge was doing an initiation in October or November, again I left in a hurry so I forgot to grab his info, but I disided that he belonged to a Lodge that was small enough and friendly enough that I would like to join. Long story short in August I put in my petition and on November 28th I was initiated.

The main thing that attracted me to Freemasonry was the morals and values, I have never seen another organization that puts these two things first, and you can clearly see the morals and values of 90% of the Freemasons out there, the other 10% are, well, in a "club" and they are only Freemasons by title not by action or deed.



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by rahboni
I was friends with several people who were. I got involved in doing the things we do before I actually joined. It made sense after I was helping with breakfasts, the circus, or other projects.

Since then, I haven't looked back. My life is better for what the Lodge means to me. I am a better person because I feel I have made even a small difference in the quality of life....for myself...but more importantly, for the that bit of charitable help my efforts have given others.

One of the "secrets" of being a Freemason can be the person you make of yourself. But that's as secret as you want it to be...

Michael


Michael,

Your post pretty much sums it up for me as well. I first became interested while active in my college fraternity (which like many was founded by Freemasonry....WAIT! Does that sound like a conspiracy???) I wanted to take a similar experience with me. I, too, have never looked back. Freemasonry has been an incredible experience for me. True, it's not for everyone, but it's certainly for me and I'm a better person for joining.

Fraternally,



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 06:43 AM
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I visit a masonic forum on a regular basis, and a master mason posted a story that he intended to use for a short talk, and to which many other masons ask to use also. He was fine with it's use and am sure he will not mind it being used in this instance.


A young man passed a pawnbroker's shop. The money lender was
standing in front of his shop, and the young man noted that he was
wearing a large and beautiful Masonic emblem. After going on a whole
block, apparently lost in thought, the young man turned back, stepped
up to the pawnbroker, and addressed him: "I see you're wearing a
Masonic emblem. I'm a Freemason too. It happens that I'm desperately in
need of $25 just now. I shall be able to repay it within ten days. You
don't know me; but I wonder whether the fact that you are a Freemason
and that I am a Freemason is sufficient to induce you to lend me the
money on my personal note."
The pawnbroker mentally appraised the young man, who was
clean-cut, neat and well-dressed. After a moments thought, he agreed
to make the loan on the strength of the young man being a Freemason.
Within a few days the young man repaid the loan as agreed and that
ended the transaction.
About four months later the young man was in a Lodge receiving
the Entered Apprentice Degree; he had not really been a Mason when he
borrowed the $25. After he had been admitted for the second section of
the degree, the young man looked across the Lodge room and saw the
pawnbroker from whom he had borrowed the $25. His face turned crimson
and he became nervous and jittery. He wondered whether he had been
recognized by the pawnbroker. Apparently not, so he planned at the
first opportunity to leave the Lodge room and avoid his benefactor. As
soon as the Lodge was closed he moved quickly for the door, but the
pawnbroker had recognized the young man, headed him off and, to the
young man's astonishment, approached him and greeted him with a smile
and outstretched hand.
"Well, I see you weren't a Freemason after all when you
borrowed that $25," the pawnbroker commented.
The blood rushed to the young man's face as he stammered, "No,
I wasn't, but I wish you'd let me explain. I had always heard that
Freemasons were charitable and ready to aid a Brother in distress. When
I passed your shop that day I didn't need that $25. I had plenty of
money in my wallet, but when I saw the Masonic emblem you were wearing,
I decided to find out whether the things I'd heard about Freemasonry
were true. You let me have the money on the strength of my being a
Freemason, so I concluded that what I had heard about Masons was true,
that they are charitable, that they do aid Brethren in distress. That
made such a deep impression on me that I presented my petition to this
Lodge and here I am. I trust that with this explanation you will
forgive me for having lied to you."
The pawnbroker responded, "Don't let that worry you too much. I
wasn't a Freemason when I let you have the money. I had no business
wearing the Masonic emblem you saw. Another man had just borrowed some
money on it, and it was so pretty that I put it on my lapel for a few
minutes. I took it off the moment you left. I didn't want anyone else
borrowing money on the strength of my being a Freemason. When you asked
for that $25, I remembered what I had heard about Masons, that they
were honest, upright, and cared for their obligations promptly. It
seemed to me that $25 wouldn't be too much to lose to learn if what I'd
heard was really true, so I lent you the money and you repaid it
exactly as you said you would. That convinced me that what I'd heard
about Masons was true so I presented my petition to this Lodge. I was
the candidate just ahead of you."




www.sciencelodge50.com...

Edit to save you a copy and paste warn.

[edit on 7-12-2004 by intrepid]



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 06:55 AM
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i have a fried who`s father is a mason...he reckons(his father)if u r a real mason u will never be without work or a job...where i come from thats a real good opportunity...i bet my friend joins up as well...although he dont need a job...



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 11:26 AM
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Bondi, that is an awesome story. Thanks for posting it... I shall pass it along to some people who don't quite understand, I trust since it is posted here it's OK for me to copy it.

Some people just don't get it, this is the kind of men (most) Freemasons are. Great example.



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by The Axeman
Bondi, that is an awesome story. Thanks for posting it... I shall pass it along to some people who don't quite understand, I trust since it is posted here it's OK for me to copy it.

Some people just don't get it, this is the kind of men (most) Freemasons are. Great example.


Could you hold off on that until I get clarification as to whether this violates the T&C?



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 11:37 AM
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Originally posted by intrepid
Could you hold off on that until I get clarification as to whether this violates the T&C?



You got it. No problem, just let me know... I suppose I could always just give the url instead.



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 11:46 AM
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Thanks.

It's OK, go ahead.



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 02:02 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid

Could you hold off on that until I get clarification as to whether this violates the T&C?


As no names, times or dates are mentioned , I think its open season on such a lovely story. See Masons even tell good stories as well?

This one is for the Masons only

A man is condemed to Death for Murrdering his friend.
In court he gives a Masonic sign, but gets no response.
In jail awaiting his punishment he gives the Masonic handshake, but gets no response.
He is transported to the Gallows in the Van , he talks to the Driver, with a few Masonic words droped , no response.
He walks up to the summit of the Gallows and is met by the Hangman.
The hangman places a black hood over his head.
The man leans toward the Hangman, and says.

"Look I am a Freemason, I tried with the Judge, I tried with the Jailer, I tried with the Driver, you are my last hope, any chance you are a Mason"

The Hangman replied, " Well mate , as a matter of fact I am , I'm in the same Lodge as the Judge, the Driver and the Jailer.
He placed the noose over the mans head.

The Murderer said " Thank Goodness Brother - can you get me out of this"

"Certianly" said the Hangman " Step off with your Left Foot"

The Guy's friend was Senior Warden in the same Lodge.



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 02:48 PM
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Bondi, that was an excellent post.

You have voted Bondi for the Way Above Top Secret award. You have two more votes this month.

[edit on 7-12-2004 by Agnis]



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 03:47 PM
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Originally posted by billmcelligott

The Murderer said " Thank Goodness Brother - can you get me out of this"


I've heard rumours that the judges that are masons will be more lenient with criminals that give them some mode of masonic recognition. How far does assisting a brother in distress go? Would they be willing to assist a brother mason guilty of 1st degree murder?

I've also heard of classmates who's father is a mason, and supposedly get off with various traffic violations because of it.

On another note, a couple weeks ago I got pulled over for a rolling stop at a stop sign. (2 Demerit points and a hefty fine in Canada). I was returning from a Knights of Columbus meetings, and also told the officer this. I had my badge on, as well as my K of C decals on the rear of the car. I really believe that my association with the order helped me in this incident. A police officer stopped me another time for having a headlight out, he gave me a "Time to Produce" instead of a fine.

Before I joined the Knights of Columbus, and had visible signs of my membership. I never got off easy on things like traffic violations. I would be fined immediately.

The Knights of Columbus are known to be honorable men in my city, doing a lot of good works for charity in the local community. I'm very proud to be associated with them, and all the people that are helped worldwide as a collective unified order.

I'm rambling again, anyhow, comments on my intial question. How far will a mason assist a fellow mason when it comes to murder, felony, or treason?



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by chief_counsellor
How far will a mason assist a fellow mason when it comes to murder, felony, or treason?



I would say not very far at all, in fact not at all period. You just cited the very things that are excepted from the obligation... The offence would most definitely be non Masonic conduct, and no help would be offered at all. I'm certain that the story was meant to convey that very point.

Haven't you had this same conversation here before? Maybe it was Gadfly, but you really seem to be bringing up the same old chestnuts time and time again. Is it on purpose or is your reading comprehension and retention really that bad?


Why ask questions you already know the answers to?

And why would you make it a point to make it known to a police officer who pulled you over that you are a KoC? Were you trying to get out of something on the pretext that you are a member of a fraternal organisation and as such should be treated differently than anyone else who ran a stop sign?

[edit on 12/7/04 by The Axeman]



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 04:36 PM
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Interesting, a web-oriented kind of system...Interesting.



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by AeroQuake
Interesting, a web-oriented kind of system...Interesting.



What are you talking about?



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 05:02 PM
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Originally posted by chief_counsellor

I'm rambling again, anyhow, comments on my intial question. How far will a mason assist a fellow mason when it comes to murder, felony, or treason?


The problem here is as you have pointed out each individual has the ability to judge each circumstance differently.

I can not say it never happens, but then you would have to answer why Masons are brought up on Masonic Charges.

Brother Theron, who I miss on this forum is involved in a case just like this right now( he is a witness I believe), yes there are Masonic Courts. They only have power over masonic matters, or in this case unMasonic matters.

However within the Masonic initiation , it clearly states " murder , treason and all other offences contary to the ordinances of the realm, and the laws of God, at all times are excluded".

[edit on 7-12-2004 by billmcelligott]



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 05:47 PM
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Thanks for clarifying that Bill.




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