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Enigmatic Energy Towers Of Ancient Peru

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posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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It's been a while since I've posted any videos on a favorite ancient mysterious site of mine.

Here are some very interesting fairly recently posted videos on exploring some mysterious ancient sites. These videos are of the 'Towers' supposedly created by the Incas. I think Brien Foerster not only shows once again how what appears to be more advanced construction the further back in time one goes and that what are assumed to be the older more rudimentary construction are possibly actually the latest attempt to recreate those that were created at much much earlier period back in time.

The question remains, whether one believes an academician narrative or the 'Older more advanced lost Civ' scenario. What were their original purpose?


High Altitude Ancient Stone Energy Towers Of Peru

On the altiplano of Peru, at 13,000 feet above sea level near Lake Titicaca there are large stone towers which most archaeologists believe were used by the Inca and Huari people to bury their dead. However, were the towers made for funerary purposes? Or used long AFTER they were first constructed for that? This is what this video explores...




Enigmatic Energy Towers Of Ancient Peru

The ancient megalithic site of Sillustani, just northwest of Lake Titicaca in Peru has large stone towers called Chullpa which most academics believe were funeral structures. However, what if some of them are thousands of years older than any known culture, and were originally made for energetic reasons, and later used to bury the dead?




Ancient Energy Generating Towers Of Lake Titicaca Peru


The Chullpa towers at Sillustani near Lake Titicaca are thought by most academics to be burial places of the Inca and others. However, engineers I have taken there are of the opinion that the finest ones are far older than the Inca, and were of some energetic purpose.

edit on 9-9-2014 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:43 AM
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Hey Slayer

There was a thread on these towers some years ago.

Tombs



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69


The question remains, whether one believes an academician narrative or the 'Older more advanced lost Civ' scenario. What were their original purpose?

Well, we can't have people believing social evolution isn't necessarily linear. Now can we?

These are some vids I haven't seen. Gonna watchem all. Thanks Slayer.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

Fascinating, thanks for posting, never heard of that theory before



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

Very interesting post as usual. Gotta get down there some day to check out these sites. Bucket list material for sure. He's speculating that some of the towers have exploded by some means. Could a lightning strike have caused damage like we see here?



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:03 PM
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Those are really neat. From what I am able to read about them it sounds like they are mausoleums.

One thing that I think that is interesting is that they are known locally as "chulpas" or "chupas".

Well, right next door in Brazil in the 70s there were all those reports of unknown flying "refrigerator-like" things, also called "chupa", that were flying around zapping and burning people.

ufodigest.com...

I dunno, pretty strange.




posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:22 PM
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Very interesting, as always Sir.

I have planned on going down there after I retire.

However, my newphew married a woman from Peru and they went down there to meet the her family etc.

He got an intestinal infection that has gone to the rear end. Messy.

Been ill for three weeks now.

Off the bucket list. I'll watch videos...
0



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune

Yes, he mentioned that some were used as exactly that.

Tombs

The questions asked were they re-purposed for tombs by later people? Were being tombs their original purpose?

He agrees the lower quality ones were used for tombs at a more recent period.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

I stopped in the first one at the dousing.

Umm.. really? Dousing? Might was well bring out a Ouija board.

The constructs are very interesting! Thanks for the info, had never been to this archaeological site before.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: bbracken677

I certainly don't advocate for utilizing a dousing rod in pursuit of science, especially at an archaeological site, but, as corny as it might sound, my grandfather hired a guy to douse for a well on his property in the late 40's and when they drilled the spot the douser picked, they hit water on the first try at the depth the douser indicated they would have to drill to. Its not very scientific but I thought it was interesting from an anecdotal perspective.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 06:33 PM
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originally posted by: SLAYER69
a reply to: Hanslune

Yes, he mentioned that some were used as exactly that.

Tombs

The questions asked were they re-purposed for tombs by later people? Were being tombs their original purpose?

He agrees the lower quality ones were used for tombs at a more recent period.





Hey sorry I busy when I did my previous posting and didn't get to finish

Here is a report of the context and construction of the towers

PDF on the Towers- THE
ABORIGINAL RUINS AT SILLUSTANI, PERU


Oh and this guy thought they were purely for storage and not burials and makes a number of points about that in the text.

One quote from the conclusion:




Sillustad, therefore, presents the characteristics not of some ruin of very ancient date but of a cluster of buildings reared by and for the Inca of Cuzco for storage, and not earlier than the latter part of the sixteenth century. Few of the better constructed edifices are finished. The general condition, the evidences of mechanical con- trivances for hoisting, the building stones abandoned by the road- side while under transportation, all prove that the work suddenly ceased for some cause unknown, but which was not necessarily the appearance of the Spaniards. Sillustani is perhaps one of the most instructive sites at which can be studied the strides made by the Inca in the art of building.


The PDF is only 29 pages and has a number of interesting images within.
edit on 9/9/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

The key thing about dowsing is to remember that there is water pretty much everywhere underground, there are only a few places where the ground will not hold water and you can see those clearly by looking at the vegetation. ie there won't be any trees where there isn't water and were there are trees or where trees - water.

One summer doing survey work in Cyprus I sank 49 test pits, hit water between 1.3 and 1.5 meters in all but one.
edit on 9/9/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune
Thanks for posting the pdf. very interesting. I was leaning toward grain storage because of the seemingly explosive destruction until I read the towers were sealed hermetically. The diagrams are excellent.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: howmuch4another

There are quite a few location involving the Incas that appear to blown apart or being damaged by what appears to be the result of some sort of explosion or massive upheaval.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: SLAYER69
a reply to: howmuch4another

There are quite a few location involving the Incas that appear to blown apart or being damaged by what appears to be the result of some sort of explosion or massive upheaval.


Lots of earthquakes I would imagine due to the active fault lines in the areas (The Andes being pushed up still I believe)

From page 61 of the PDF contains a clue as to the their 'destroyed' nature.




The belief that valuable objects of metal are therein concealed is deeply rooted in the minds of the people, although there is no authentic recollection of the finding of any ‘‘ treasure ” at Sillustani. Many of the towers were partly tom down and searched long ago, but no tradition in regard to what was found in them was obtainable by us. The universal opinion, published and unpublished, is that the towers of Sillustani were designed as sepulchers, burial towers, or funeral monuments, and we held the same opinion ourselves.


Another view on their use comes from early Spanish sources




Although we search in vain for data in regard to Sillustani, we meet with positive information concerning a site called Hatan-Cola. This place (or rather Kolla) lay close to Umayo, and while there exist some ruins there which Squier has described,' nowhere in the vicinity are there any of the type and importance of those at Sillustani. Cieza de Lebn, who visited Hatun-Kolla in I 540, speaks of it as follows : '' From Pucara to Hatuncolla there are something like fifteen leagues ; in their neighborhood are some villages, is Nicasio, Xullaca and others. Hatuncolla, in, times past, was the chief thing of the Collas . . . and afterwards the Incas embellished the village with an increased number of edifices and a great number of depositories, where, by their command, was put the tribute that was brought from the country around." . . .


I wonder if those depositories might have been the towers?
edit on 9/9/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 10:20 PM
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To hear 'experts' tell it, half the best stuff the living built, was for the dead.

I am skeptical about such assumptions. Many cultures appeared to have a high point that was followed by a period of lesser knowledge, which may have left the people without the baseline info needed to maintain the original function. Or in some cases, warfare and in ancient days (outside the Vedas anyway) there wasn't transportation, and a group could displace another group, losing knowledge from the first area not yet well distributed, yet all be from the same peoples, in which case this is not something that would be very apparent all this time later.

I had never seen these things. Neat -- thanks OP!

RC



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 10:27 PM
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originally posted by: RedCairo
To hear 'experts' tell it, half the best stuff the living built, was for the dead.

RC


When the dead are responsible for keeping the world running and you fed you would tend to value your dead, many cultures had the king as a god king or they worshiped their ancestors. Simply look at how Europeans use to build enormous cathedrals in small towns, some three thousand of them. They did so, so people who died could have help going to heaven, and to glorified a resurrected god.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:57 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune

They did so, so people who died could have help going to heaven, and to glorified a resurrected god.
Or, they did so to overwhelm people with the awesomeness of God, and keep them in fear of it. Thereby insuring the power and wealth of the Church because if you don't do (and pay) the Church what it says...well, just look what happens.

I was in France for the first time a couple of months ago. Chartres is awesome (literally) and impressive...and scary.

I guess it's just a matter of point of view.

Here's a story about another (chemically altered) viewpoint.


edit on 9/9/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 01:08 AM
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originally posted by: Phage

I was in France for the first time a couple of months ago. Chartres is awesome (literally) and impressive...and scary.



I always found the cathedral of Rheims (Reims), whose stain glass windows are a dark blue and rose color rather creepy.

Yes religion always had a dark side.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 04:41 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

Another brilliant thread.

Something I have been paddling around in my mind is that current thinking says that the stone age was the first age of our ability, then onto brass etc.

I am wondering whether the stone age was actually the culminating age of a pre-civilisation that the more recent cultures still had knowledge from and utilised. I wonder because of the exquisite nature of their designs, precision and where they actually built etc. I just get that hunch that we have our stone age in the wrong place in our thinking because their abilities were so sophisticated and advanced.

Looking round my town its only the older stone buildings that would last were we to have some minor catastrophe and we could see what was left afterwards. Most of our modern buildings with their 'clipped' technology wouldn't stand too much upheaval, whilst the stone ones probably would barely shift. In my eco village one cannot put any furniture on the walls unless one can guess at whats behind that part of the wall.




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