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Fever Mounts as Stunning Statues Found at Ancient Greek Tomb

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posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 10:21 PM
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This is more of an update to a previous thread on this topic in order to keep ATS in the loop. According to the article, which is about the newly uncovered Alexander the Great era Tomb and talks about updates on this subject; Archaeologists have delved deeper into the tomb



Athens (AFP) - Two stunning caryatid statues have been unearthed holding up the entrance to the biggest ancient tomb ever found in Greece, archaeologists said.

"The left arm of one and the right arm of the other are raised in a symbolic gesture to refuse entry to the tomb," a statement from the culture ministry said Saturday.

Speculation is mounting that the tomb, which dates from Alexander's lifetime (356-323BC), may be untouched, with its treasures intact.


Authorities don't believe it to be Alexander himself but someone of major importance. It's believed that Alexander is buried somewhere in Alexandria; a city he founded.


Theories abound about who could be buried in the tumulus tomb, ranging from Alexander's Bactrian wife Roxane, to his mother Olympias or one of his generals.


Check it out, ATS

news.yahoo.com...




posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 10:30 PM
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Neat. They had some good sculptures back then.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 10:44 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Neat. They had some good sculptures back then.


Well, yes....but beyond that is the potential for something great here.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 10:48 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: rickymouse
Neat. They had some good sculptures back then.


Well, yes....but beyond that is the potential for something great here.


They could find a Big Mac that is still just like new.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I often ask about these things - when is grave robbing not grave robbing? Is it determined by how many years have passed? By the academic credentials of the robbers? Who decides when a grave such as this is found that it's alright to open it and take things from it?

Awhile ago I wrote a satiric news item about an Egyptian archeologist, a not very smart one, who collects monies and then goes on an expedition to find and open the tomb of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the Valley of the Kings in Atlanta, Georgia, America. It was written after I saw a thread here about yet another tomb being robbed by modern-day academic vandals.

None of this is to imply that I won't be interested in what they find in this tomb, I'm just glad I'm not the one tomb-robbing in the enlightened 21st century.


edit on 8-9-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 10:52 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Neat. They had some good sculptures back then.


And some gifted sculptors.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 10:59 PM
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originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: rickymouse
Neat. They had some good sculptures back then.


And some gifted sculptors.


Woops, I can't spell



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: lostbook
It is a shame that someone defaced the statues. But that still goes on today reminds me of the people shooting at the Buddha statues in the Mideast a few years back.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

Yeah man thats very true.

In the video it said that they found entrances into it already which could mean it had already been plundered. If it wasn't plundered though the artifacts will end up in a museum I imagine, so at least it's not one mans personal gain.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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a reply to: Aleister


when is grave robbing not grave robbing?

Better question: when is grave-robbing justified?

No-one can justifiably be offended by the opening of a tomb over a thousand years old. What we learn from the contents is far more valuable than the appeal to sentiment. A corpse is a corpse.

Me, I'm leaving my body to science.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 03:42 PM
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I think this thread warrents a bump as I came across this article today that hints that 'Olympias' (Alexander the Great's mother) may be buried within the tomb.


"These female sculptures may specifically be Klodones, priestesses of Dionysus with whom Olympias, Alexander the Great's mother, consorted," Chugg told Discovery News. "This is because the baskets they wear on their heads are sacred to Dionysus."

Chugg considers Olympias as the person most likely buried in the magnificent tomb.


Link and more info here



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