It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

My experience with CT Contrast and everything that goes with it afterwards.

page: 2
2
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 08:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
I've found that spicy foods seem to help when you've had your gallbladder removed.

Also, Triphala (Indian Ayervedic medicine) keeps my bowels happy. It's pretty amazing stuff!


Really?? I would never have thought that about spicy foods, too bad I can't eat them. I like mild spicy foods but they have never agreed with my body.

I will have to look up this Triphala. Can I get it at a health food store?




posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 08:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
That's really weird with the Zantac. I take prescription strength Naproxen which is basically Aleve, and I've never had a peep out of my insurance over it being OTC so take it that way.

It depends on the insurance. I take Prilosec with is also over the counter yet they cover that. It just depends on the insurance company. I was surprised they wouldn't cover Zantac. It wasn't that big of a deal because I have Zantac 75 already from when I was pregnant. I had major heartburn that sent me to the ER twice. Zantac 75 was the only thing that helped. It didn't get rid of it completely but it made me more comfortable.


Now, I have had the number issue before with my Zomig. The insurance doesn't see why I would need more than the six they will typically cover in a month, but since I have chronic migraine, my neurologist writes for 10. So, we have to jump through hoops to get a 6-month special dispensation to get the extra number every month. Since my migraines have gotten back under control, my husband and I have stopped fighting it since it's been a long time since I've actually needed more than two or three at most in a month.

I have never heard of this and I suffer from migraines. They put me on Topomax and I couldn't take it. It knocked me out! I can't function like that when I had a baby to take care of. I will have to mention this to my doctor and see what she says....Yea it is really weird what insurance companies will and won't cover. There was a shot, imitrex I believe, that they gave me at the hospital and doctors office that worked and took the edge off but my insurance would only cover like 5 for a month and anything over that was our of pocket and those were INSANELY expensive! I am only allowed 12 zofran a month, which is nuts esp because the interstitial cystitis can make me nauseous after urination sometimes esp before and during that time of the month so the zofran truly helps and stretching 12 just sucks.



But basically, some insurance companies do get suspicious if you want more covered than they consider "normal," and it's not that you can't get them to cover the extra often, but that you have to jump through hoops to get it forced through. So, if it's a one-shot deal, it's often not worth it.

OH yes hoop jumping is common! I take zofran monthly. What I will do at my next GP visit is have her call the insurance company to get an authorization for the amount she wants to me to get so I dont have to only have 12. I am pretty sure she won't mind because she is just the best and if it wasn't for her I'd have a lot of issues left untreated but she listened to me and did what a doctor is suppose to do!!



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 08:24 PM
link   
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Thank you everyone for all the replies and information. I truly appreciate it. I am checking out the links mentioned by some as I type.

This was definitely something that freaked me out and I wouldn't wish it on anyone. I hope to find a reason as to why I had such a reaction.

Thank you



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 08:31 PM
link   
Firstly im so sorry what you had to go through!
You don't need to drink that horrible contrast drink they can easilly do the injection which apart from the initial body going warm and weird urinating sensation it doesnt have nasty side effects.. I keep having to have CT's because i had a hernia after my last c section then i got it fixed twice and both times it was done all wrong and i have mesh and bowl all looped in and weird , but anyway with my last CT they tried to make me drink the solution i took a few sips and was sick so siick i had to go be sick then i was just all weird and shakey i told them theres no way im drinking it use the injection one or forget it, and they did the injection which i had no issues with and never have before.. It definitely sounds like you had a medical allergic reaction too me not just side effects.. You poor thing


ETA i had my gall bladder out a few years back and still get 'gall bladder attacks' even though it isn't there, for almost a year leading up to the surgery i would get pain that i can only compare to labour contractions it was the most severe cramping ever, now though i will only get it if i eat something creamy or acidy or oily so i avoid them foods because the pain just isn't worth it! you do have to adjust what food you eat after surgery because you don't have that 'filter' anymore, thats all that i can think of that would have caused pain like yours to make you go to hospital. Its horrible pain!
edit on 8-9-2014 by Shana91aus because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 08:38 PM
link   
a reply to: tigertatzen


The reaction you described is typical in patients who do not observe dietary caution post-op, and is extremely common…makes no sense that no one there knew what was happening to you,

But would if patient "overlooked" mentioning food intake. They would take it for truth and look elsewhere. Your post makes the most sense so far.

Its important to follow post op directions carefully and be honest with your doctors if you can't.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 09:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: mblahnikluver
I doubt I was dehydrated because I drink a lot of water. I have a water bottle that I fill and I think it's 32oz and I fill it about 3-4 times a day. All I drink is water.


I know this is going to cause an off topic %$#@*! storm, but that is probably too much water.

Let the anecdotal stories and flaming commence...



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:32 AM
link   

originally posted by: Mirthful Me

originally posted by: mblahnikluver
I doubt I was dehydrated because I drink a lot of water. I have a water bottle that I fill and I think it's 32oz and I fill it about 3-4 times a day. All I drink is water.


I know this is going to cause an off topic %$#@*! storm, but that is probably too much water.

Let the anecdotal stories and flaming commence...



Considering drinking that amount of water a day was not out of the norm for her and hasn't caused discomfort any other time i doubt it, its not uncommon for people (myself included) to go through discomfort such as this after a gall bladder removal especially when you have not worked out what foods your body can tolerate and what foods that it can't anymore that seems alot more plausible than too much water also the amount she drank isn't too much we are recommended to drink eight 8ounce glasses of water each day thats 64oz (1.9litres) and OP said that she fills her 32oz bottle 3-4 times a day its not even always double the recommended minimum thats needed for normal bodily functions too happen, any excess is just going to be urinated out i think it would take alot more water than that to cause any problems i am aware that it can cause imbalances of electrolytes or very very rarely things like hyponatremia if there is too much but its rare for water to cause extreme discomfort like that when the person is used to drinking that amount and their body is used too it also.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:19 AM
link   
a reply to: intrptr




But would if patient "overlooked" mentioning food intake. They would take it for truth and look elsewhere. Your post makes the most sense so far.

Its important to follow post op directions carefully and be honest with your doctors if you can't.


Fifteen years in emergency medicine, seeing this type of thing time and time again with people not following post-op instructions and being less than forthcoming with medical staff about their dietary habits within the recovery period, and the fact that this happened to my own sister despite me repeatedly telling her to adhere to the surgeon's regimen until she was fully healed just scream "non-compliance" to me in this described scenario.

I feel for the OP; no one wants to be in pain, but this sounds to me as if this person made an "oopsie" with their diet because they were feeling better and decided to go ahead and have that (insert fat or sugar-laden food item here...in my sis's case it was a slice of pizza with double cheese and bacon) even though they were advised not to, and suffered the painful consequence of their error. This is extremely common; in fact I would venture to say depending on the size of the hospital, probably something the ED staff sees at least once a week. There is nothing to suggest that this was anything rare or atypical in any way...and as evidenced by the fact that the OP is not still in the hospital undergoing extensive testing or worse, recovering from exploratory surgery to determine the problem, had to have been something minor and easily treatable.

You are absolutely correct: surgeons expect people to overdo it after surgery and are fully prepared to deal with issues that arise from that, but if the patient is not forthcoming with honest information and does not learn his/her lesson from the experience, sadly something so minor could become life-threatening. Happily, that is not the case here as the OP seems to be perfectly fine at this juncture.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:26 AM
link   
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Yep. I get Triphala at my Kroger-owned grocery store in the natural foods section.

I read a study in which capsicum reduces the amount of bile the liver produces -- thus for people without gallbladders it helps! I did some research into this after I found myself eating spicy foods more and more after mine was removed.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:53 AM
link   
a reply to: Shana91aus




also the amount she drank isn't too much we are recommended to drink eight 8ounce glasses of water each day thats 64oz (1.9litres) and OP said that she fills her 32oz bottle 3-4 times a day its not even always double the recommended minimum thats needed for normal bodily functions too happen, any excess is just going to be urinated out i think it would take alot more water than that to cause any problems i am aware that it can cause imbalances of electrolytes or very very rarely things like hyponatremia if there is too much but its rare for water to cause extreme discomfort like that when the person is used to drinking that amount and their body is used too it also.


Wow...I cannot believe how long it took me to decipher what you said here...it's amazing how much punctuation really assists us when we read and how the lack of it makes the English language sound like mumbo-jumbo, isn't it?

Anyway, I was wondering if you are aware that 32oz. consumed four times a day adds up to 128oz., which just happens to be double the 64oz. "recommended minimum" you quoted? There is no such thing, by the way, as everyone has different requirements for both fluid and nutrient intake. Who was it that "recommended" this amount to you as a template for all people on the planet?

That is how bad things, like water intoxication and hyponatremia occur (particularly in GI patients, who have altered absorption rates, especially after surgery), because people do not confirm with their physician what their personal requirements are to meet the needs of their body. I also would like to point out that when excess water is "urinated out", as you so eloquently put it, it takes the body's electrolytes with it...and is precisely how hyponatremia occurs (sodium being an electrolyte, for those not in the know), the prefix "hypo" meaning "low" or indicative of a deficiency.

Water intoxication at its initial onset mimics dehydration and causes profound thirst...it is a paradoxical effect...and that is how people die from it. What might be a "minimum" amount of water for one person can be fatal to another. Mirthful Me is absolutely correct...depending on the individual, that much water can harm a person...and it is not "rare", very or otherwise.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:59 AM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

You had trouble breathing and they gave you MORPHINE?

Morphine makes me forget to breath. I can't take it. And they gave my father a BIG dose of morphine in the hospital at the end to 'help' him along. I'm kinda surprised they gave it to you while you had trouble breathing.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 12:13 PM
link   
a reply to: FlyersFan




You had trouble breathing and they gave you MORPHINE?


Morphine is given to patients in respiratory distress because it relaxes the accessory muscles and tamps down the sympathetic nervous system response that causes the sensation of "air hunger" or the perception that they aren't getting enough air, which can cause hyperventilation and respiratory depression. It sounds really weird, I know, but it is a very common treatment for shortness of breath.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: tigertatzen


The reaction you described is typical in patients who do not observe dietary caution post-op, and is extremely common…makes no sense that no one there knew what was happening to you,

But would if patient "overlooked" mentioning food intake. They would take it for truth and look elsewhere. Your post makes the most sense so far.

Its important to follow post op directions carefully and be honest with your doctors if you can't.



NO It doesn't because I DID follow post op instructions. Are you people mental or what?

My doctor knew everything I was eating and said it was all fine and what i was told to eat. So no it wasn't what I ate since I followed doctors orders. I'm not some idiot who ignores what a doctor tells me.

Christ some people on here never cease to amaze me with their accusations.

I am the most honest with my doctors. Why wouldn't' I be? I have to be honest to they can treat me better!! Not everyone is an idiot an lies.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mirthful Me

originally posted by: mblahnikluver
I doubt I was dehydrated because I drink a lot of water. I have a water bottle that I fill and I think it's 32oz and I fill it about 3-4 times a day. All I drink is water.


I know this is going to cause an off topic %$#@*! storm, but that is probably too much water.

Let the anecdotal stories and flaming commence...



It is? You can drink too much water? Huh. I drank this much while pregnant too and they never said anything about it being too much. I never knew that.

Thanks. I will look into that.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:06 PM
link   
a reply to: tigertatzen

OMG again you are not listening.

It has NOTHING TO DO WITH MY FOOD INTAKE!

I am getting really sick of your accusations that are not true. I do not like being accused of things I did not do and it takes a lot to piss me off.

I am one who will openly admit when I am in the wrong and in this case YOU are in the wrong. I followed my instructions to a T! This isn't the first surgery I have had and i'm no dummy. Im a grown ass woman who knows how to follow instructions and listen to doctors. I dont lie about anything to doctors because then they can't treat me properly if I lie. You have no idea what I"ve been through in the last year and to make such accusations is just rude.

I dont care if you have worked in the medical field for 15yrs not everyone is the same! There ARE those of us who DO listen and tell our doctors everything. Heck my doctor has even made comments about how honest I am. I told her well why would I lie to her she is there to help me!

Ok I'm done with this topic.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:11 PM
link   
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Thank you everyone for all your replies, suggestions and experiences.

I have had some residual effects from it just by reading various sites on the contrast I was given but it seems to be getting better.


I appreciate ALL of your replies even if I didn't agree with you.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Mirthful Me

I just wanted to let you know I requested a form to report my reaction to the contrast.

Thank you for that!



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 03:20 PM
link   
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Forgive me. I have SLE and can't even count the number of times I've been in renal failure, respiratory failure, had pleurisy, had pancreatitis, splenomegaly...you name it, I've suffered it...and have a ridiculously high pain tolerance, so my apologies if it sounded as if I was minimizing your pain response. I feel for you, I really do. Something that I can brush off as an annoyance could have another person on their knees in 10/10 pain. That's not a good thing, by the way...by the time I feel severe pain it is so far gone it's almost impossible to treat because I weigh less than 120 lbs and the docs are always reluctant to give me Dilaudid, which is the only thing that really touches it, because it drops my blood pressure so drastically. It also makes me projectile vomit like something out of The Exorcist (shudder).

My sister had her cholecystectomy in 2000 and it took forever for her to find a diet that would not make her sick. She had "dumping syndrome", so anything fatty, sugary or rich would set her off within minutes of eating it. She was thrilled at the drastic weight loss, but that was definitely not the way to go...she essentially lost over a year of her life being sick day in and day out.

I feel you on the egg thing too. Lupus is an evil bitch, unfortunately, and causes spontaneous allergic reactions to things that previously were perfectly ok...I am now allergic to eggs, melon and avocado and did a two year stint being a Celiac before my body finally decided that wheat was a friend again. Needless to say, I stick to a pretty standard variety of things I know won't send me rushing to the ED and thusly my diet is pretty bland. But it's better than living in fear of eating, which is what I experienced for many years in the past, so I'll take it.


Gastrografin is very irritating to the stomach lining and it is a very common reaction, so it's puzzling as to why the hospital staff acted as if they had no idea what was happening with you. I can assure you that if it was an allergy, you would have known it, because a simple blood test will determine that. It sounds as if you had some stomach upset before being given the contrast, so it is not surprising at all that it exacerbated the cramping... again, that is extremely common with that drug. I'm only surprised they didn't give you zantac or something beforehand to minimize the gastric irritation. Either way, it's very good that it was nothing serious and you'll be able to complete your recovery.

You might have to do a lot of trial-and-error with your diet before you find something that will work for you, but for now definitely follow the discharge instructions to the letter, and no matter how good you feel, don't overeat because that will also overtax your digestive tract...you no longer have a gallbladder, therefore you don't store the extra bile your body normally would use to break down fats and sugars in the digestive process, and if you eat even one bite too much of anything, you can suffer dumping syndrome...which is exactly what I think happened to you. Whether you ate something that was not on your list of approved foods or maybe just a little too much of something, the reaction can be the same.

Also, regarding dehydration...I know you said that you drink plenty of water, but remember...you've been taking pain meds post-op and they have a dehydrating effect on the body. Ditto drugs like Pepcid...a lot of them are antihistamines, and also will dehydrate you. So mild dehydration could very well have caused the painful cramping too. Just don't increase your fluid intake without consulting your doc, because you don't want to end up with water intoxication...your gastric absorption is going to be different too, particularly while on narcotics and so soon after surgery, and it sounds like you already drink a rather large amount of water. Good luck with your recovery!



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 05:14 PM
link   
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Christ some people on here never cease to amaze me with their accusations.

Relax, I didn't accuse you directly of anything. I wasn't even talking to you, but tigertartzen. Who said this in their reply to me…


Happily, that is not the case here as the OP seems to be perfectly fine at this juncture.

I'm glad you are doing better, too. Geez…



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 06:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: tigertatzen
a reply to: Shana91aus




also the amount she drank isn't too much we are recommended to drink eight 8ounce glasses of water each day thats 64oz (1.9litres) and OP said that she fills her 32oz bottle 3-4 times a day its not even always double the recommended minimum thats needed for normal bodily functions too happen, any excess is just going to be urinated out i think it would take alot more water than that to cause any problems i am aware that it can cause imbalances of electrolytes or very very rarely things like hyponatremia if there is too much but its rare for water to cause extreme discomfort like that when the person is used to drinking that amount and their body is used too it also.


Wow...I cannot believe how long it took me to decipher what you said here...it's amazing how much punctuation really assists us when we read and how the lack of it makes the English language sound like mumbo-jumbo, isn't it?

Anyway, I was wondering if you are aware that 32oz. consumed four times a day adds up to 128oz., which just happens to be double the 64oz. "recommended minimum" you quoted? There is no such thing, by the way, as everyone has different requirements for both fluid and nutrient intake. Who was it that "recommended" this amount to you as a template for all people on the planet?

That is how bad things, like water intoxication and hyponatremia occur (particularly in GI patients, who have altered absorption rates, especially after surgery), because people do not confirm with their physician what their personal requirements are to meet the needs of their body. I also would like to point out that when excess water is "urinated out", as you so eloquently put it, it takes the body's electrolytes with it...and is precisely how hyponatremia occurs (sodium being an electrolyte, for those not in the know), the prefix "hypo" meaning "low" or indicative of a deficiency.

Water intoxication at its initial onset mimics dehydration and causes profound thirst...it is a paradoxical effect...and that is how people die from it. What might be a "minimum" amount of water for one person can be fatal to another. Mirthful Me is absolutely correct...depending on the individual, that much water can harm a person...and it is not "rare", very or otherwise.





Haha elequently, well there is other ways i could have put it put they didn't sound very nice. I know what your saying and maybe i should have worded that better but yes i can count and am aware that if that was doubled it would be twice the amount but what i was trying too say is she doesnt always drink that and bottom line her body is used too that amount of water everyday, personally i wish i could drink that much water everyday maybe i would be alot more healthier than i am at this point. From what i have read it is rare but alright.as for the 8 glasses a day that is a recommended minimum here in Australia and thats what the health guidelines say too drink i cant find alot of places with it online but there is this

Source- Mayo Clinic

How much water do you need? Every day you lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. For your body to function properly, you must replenish its water supply by consuming beverages and foods that contain water. So how much fluid does the average, healthy adult living in a temperate climate need? The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly about 13 cups (3 liters) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is about 9 cups (2.2 liters) of total beverages a day. What about the advice to drink 8 glasses a day? Everyone has heard the advice, "Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day." That's about 1.9 liters, which isn't that different from the Institute of Medicine recommendations. Although the "8 by 8" rule isn't supported by hard evidence, it remains popular because it's easy to remember. Just keep in mind that the rule should be reframed as: "Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of fluid a day," because all fluids count toward the daily total.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join