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My experience with CT Contrast and everything that goes with it afterwards.

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posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 11:38 AM
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I recently spent the night in the hospital this past Saturday. I had horrid abdominal pain in the late afternoon that knocked me on my rear. It came out of know where. This was about a week after surgery to have my gallbladder removed. I was in so much pain I was nauseous and I couldn't think straight.

When I got to the hospital they hooked me up to an IV, took some blood and gave me some morphine which helped somewhat. Well then they told me they were doing a CT Scan and that I'd have to drink the contrast drink before the CT Scan and it would take 3hrs for the whole process. Yes such fun that was NOT! I drank the first cup no problem and then I started getting a little cramping which I thought was just my initial reason for going to the ER. I then drank the rest of the drink and it went downhill from there. I had a severe reaction to the contrast. I was not given the typical barium sulfate but a lemon drink called Gastrografin. I went downhill fast. I was in so much pain abdominally I had to call my nurse into the room. I was sweating and couldn't breathe. My upper abdomen where my diaphragm was was tightening and making it hard for me to breath. The pain was radiating to my back and it was worst than labor pains I kid you not! I was see in stars and dizzy like i"d pass out. They gave me more morphine which did nothing so they gave me something called dialudid. It took a good 20mins of sheer agony for it to kick in. It worked but I still had trouble breathing so they gave me oxygen. I then had my CT Scan and everything came back fine. NOBODY in the hospital knew why I had the reaction I did. It honestly scared me that they didn't know why I reacted this way.

I am so lucky I wasn't in the regular imaging center I go to for scans. I've never had one with contrast before and if i ever have to again there is NO way I'm taking that again. I felt like I was going to die no joke. It scared the crap out of me. It made my whole body cramp up. I couldn't even speak. So after about 6 hrs in the hospital they sent me home with 4 different medications.

I get to the pharmacy and long story short my insurance will only cover two of the 4, shocker! They would not cover the Zantac because it's OTC now BUT to get the same dosage OTC you spend A LOT more than you would with insurance. Such a scam they have going making it legal, they make more money. Why am I not surprised. The tramadol was covered but recently it was deemed a Class 4 drug here in the states so it's a pain to even get it. It does nothing pain wise for me so I will just stick to the one medication I have for pain or just deal with it. Now the one I had the hardest time getting was Zofran. It is for nausea. It's not a narcotic nor is it addictive. I had to call my insurance 2 times, the hospital again to get them to call and give authorization and then the pharmacy a few times to get them to make sure they got all the proper authorization before insurance would pay for it and even then I wasn't able to get the 20 they gave me only 12...It was INSANE because this medication is the only thing that helps my nausea from my stomach issues.

You would have thought I wanted some kind of severe narcotic but then again they have no problem handing those out like candy!

I am more upset with what happened with the contrast drink and what happened. How did nobody not know what was going on. It was a good thing I knew my nurse. I grew up with her so I didnt feel too embarrassed crying in pain in front of her. I even apologized lol and she said don't feel sorry, she didn't like seeing me that way. I am not kidding when I say I'd rather go through child birth again than EVER do that contrast drink AGAIN!

I have no idea why I had the reaction I did and I can' seem to find answers online other than maybe a reaction to iodine.


SO any medical professionals on here can you give me some insight? I was quite scared and would like to know what happened because I have more scans coming up and they will more than likely require contrast and I dont want to do that. I won't be in a hospital setting so that is all I need is to have this reaction in an imaging center. They'd probably have to call 911 esp since I couldn't breathe.


Anyway I didn't know where to put this so I put it in the medical forum.




posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 11:43 AM
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I'm sorry you had such a painful experience.

If you have time you need to check which gall bladder removal proceedure you had. The recovery seems to be different depending on how you received treatment. Also, is it possible the drink they gave you was supposed yo be more gentle on your new digestive system?



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: Iamthatbish
I'm sorry you had such a painful experience.

If you have time you need to check which gall bladder removal proceedure you had. The recovery seems to be different depending on how you received treatment. Also, is it possible the drink they gave you was supposed yo be more gentle on your new digestive system?


Thank you.


Yea I have to contact my GI doctor tomorrow. They are not there today. It was NUTS! I have never had such pain and not being able to breathe was scary. I was freaked but at least i was in the hospital. My husband wasn't there so I was scared because I was alone. I had sent him home with our son because I knew I'd be there a long time and my son was getting fussy and it was way past his bedtime.

They knew I had gallbladder surgery a week prior. They wanted to do the CT scan to check for complications or adhesions and stuff like that. One doctor said that when people have issues like i did it can be the pancreas and pancreatitis and I did NOT want that! My husbands dad had that and dealt with it for years and both my mother in law and husband said it was miserable. I was much relieved when they came back and said everything was fine. They had no idea why I had the pain in the first place other than residual pain from the surgery.

I have been googling about this all morning and it seems many others have had the same problems but nobody has answers.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: mblahnikluver

The surgery used gas in your abdominal area to see the work area right? Sometimes they don't release it all. If you Google that I think they suggest lots of fluids to expell the extra gas. (the excess pressure after surgery can cause pain)

I hope you heal nicely. While following the drs orders is very important I have found listening to elderly people in the office know so much that isn't documented or maybe its just not to big pharmas benefit.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: mblahnikluver

Sorry to hear about your experience,
I am not a medical professional. Anesthesia can give you constipation for days after, pain killers can give you constipation and Barium liquid (contrast liquid) may cause constipation. Were you taking any stool softeners after your gall bladder surgery?



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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originally posted by: gmoneystunt
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Sorry to hear about your experience,
I am not a medical professional. Anesthesia can give you constipation for days after, pain killers can give you constipation and Barium liquid (contrast liquid) may cause constipation. Were you taking any stool softeners after your gall bladder surgery?


I was not constipated. My surgery was a week before this and I took stool softeners with my meds like I was told to. I had no BM issues. I learned the hard way with percocets when I had my son. I did not know it would cause that. NOW I know to take Colace when I'm on such meds, which has only been after surgery. When they did the CT Scan they even said I wasn't constipated. I didn't know they could tell lol.

I also didn't have the barium contrast but the Gastrografin one. It's a liquid drink with iodine that tastes like lemonade. It actually wasn't bad lol. I wonder why they chose that over the barium sulfate. Maybe cost? I dont' know. I do have insurance so cost shouldn't matter unless my dumb insurance wouldn't cover that.

I have had some cramping since they gave me that stuff but I was also given meds for the cramping. It's not bad to the point like it was at the hospital so thank god. I take one pill 4 times a day to help with cramping.

This is the first time in my life that i have ever had so many meds in my system or even had surgery. I've had 3 in the last 14mths. C-section, fallopian tubes removed as well as a non cancerous tumor and then my gallbladder. I dont ever want to see an operating room again!



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: mblahnikluver

Just a suggestion. Do you think you could possibly have a allergy to iodine or possibly any of the other ingredients of Gastrografin?

meglumine diatrizoate and/or sodium diatrizoate the active ingredients in Gastrografin e.g. iodine

In hypersensitive patients, exposure to iodine may cause a rash (contact dermatitis), hives (when ingested), or, very rarely, anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition that requires emergency medical attention.

Consequently, idiosyncratic contrast reactions are best termed "anaphylactoid" "allergy-like," or "pseudoallergic," rather than "allergic."

Symptoms of anaphylaxis include:
abdominal pain, confusion, diarrhea, dizziness, difficulty breathing, heart palpitations, hives (along with other symptoms), lightheadedness, nausea or vomiting, rapid pulse



edit on 8-9-2014 by gmoneystunt because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 01:19 PM
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I haven't posted on ATS in quite some time, and am happy to go on lurking, but felt compelled to reply to this post at least because someone I know has experience with this kind of reaction to what you were given.

Two possibilities spring to mind. The first is, if you are on metformin (and some others, can't remember or find them unfortunately,) then this particular liquid contrast agent may cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of which can include severe abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, hyperventilation, and other things.

The second is an anaphylactic reaction. That would account for the difficulty breathing, but in that case you would tend to also have a feeling of your throat closing, swelling of the face, hives, or other signs of severe allergic reaction. That those weren't your symptoms (they weren't right?) and that the symptoms subsided with analgesics rather than corticosteroids (they didn't give you anything like prednisone, right?) would seem to minimize the possibility that that's what you experienced, but it's not entirely out of the realm of possibility.

The one thing I will say is that I definitely would NOT take that contrast again until you know for certain if there was a drug interaction or if you have an allergy. Have your PCP research all possible drug contraindications for Diatrizoic acid and any names - generic or otherwise - of all medications you are currently taking. You need to identify exactly what happened for future reference so they can be informed.

Good luck and I hope you never experience this again. Peace.

*Returns to lurking status*



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: mblahnikluver

Barium is not typically given for an abdominal CT, just fyi. They gave you exactly what is typically given for that test. Sounds like maybe it was a little too acidic for you on top of an already upset stomach and it caused some cramping. What type of a cholecystectomy did you undergo? Recovery is usually six weeks for laparoscopy and even longer if they have to make a long incision. And what had you been eating prior to the issue? That was likely your problem right there, unfortunately.

I hope they told you that you can no longer eat like you did before the surgery...without excess bile to break down fatty acids, you can experience something called "dumping syndrome", and it causes severe cramping, usually accompanied by severe diarrhea and vomiting. You will no longer have the ability to eat whatever you want; you'll have to be careful until your digestive system adjusts and that can take up to a year.

This info should have been given to you upon discharge from your surgery, so you may want to go back and read your discharge instructions again. Stay away from fatty foods, dairy, etc...should all be laid out for you in your paperwork. Your body cannot process certain foods anymore. The reaction you described is typical in patients who do not observe dietary caution post-op, and is extremely common...makes no sense that no one there knew what was happening to you, unless you were in a hospital that has never had a post-op patient before, which is highly unlikely even in the most rural areas.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: mblahnikluver

One thing that I'm pretty sure about is the reason you were given gastrografin rather than barium sulfate. There was a risk that you had a post-op perforation following the removal of your gall bladder. Barium sulfate can cause severe peritonitis if it gets outside of your g.i. tract. So, gastrografin is safer if they think there is even a small chance of a perforation.

As for the severe symptoms after ingesting the gastrografin...

I'm inclined to think that you have a hypersensitive type reaction to the contrast. Usually a person has other symptoms as mentioned in above posts (rash, hives, etc.) but your symptoms made me think of angioedema of the small intestines. I actually have a similar reaction to a cheap food filler (textured soy protein) - severe burning gastric pain, abdominal swelling and cramping. Not all allergic reactions involve skin and/or respiratory issues.

I'm sorry that you had to go through what you did. I hope you continue your healing process with no more set-backs.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 02:26 PM
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Sorry to hear about your adverse event with the oral CT contrast, but abdominal cramping is fairly common with Gastrografin, especially if you are dehydrated (often problematic due to the preferred NPO status for abdominal imaging). I think it is unlikely to be any kind of iodine sensitivity as those issues manifest differently, and your providers would have taken different measures to treat the onset of iodine anaphylaxis.

If you haven't already seen it, here is an information sheet: Gastrografin

This should not be confused with the manufacturer's insert, which is here.

You can report adverse events at FDA MedWatch or by calling 1-800-FDA-1088.

Gastrografin is pretty much the gold standard in prepped and unprepped cross sectional abdominal imaging, and should you be faced with another exam, please inform the providers of your past experience.
edit on 9/8/2014 by Mirthful Me because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: NiteNGale2




One thing that I'm pretty sure about is the reason you were given gastrografin rather than barium sulfate.


The reason Gastrografin was given is that it was a simple, routine diagnostic abdominal CT to investigate acute symptoms. Barium is used for abdominal series in which the patient is fasting 8 to 12 hours in advance and if the series includes a lower GI set, a barium enema is given as well. Gastrografin is more readily absorbed and is the contrast of choice in an impromptu visit with acute symptoms present. An allergic reaction to ingested contrast is very uncommon, as is hypersensitivity...those are more common when contrast is administered intravenously. Had either of those been the case with this scenario, Dilaudid and Zofran would not have solved the problem. It was most likely a very common case of dietary upset due to not following post-op instructions.

ETA: Given the choice between the two, I personally would take Gastrografin and some cramping over Barium any day of the week. Lol.


edit on 8-9-2014 by tigertatzen because: added thought



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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a reply to: mblahnikluver

I'm so glad you are feeling better. What you expressed in terms of pain is the exact type of gallbladder attacks I used to get. Couldn't breath in because it was too painful so short shallow breaths, the abdominal pain right behind the sternum. I also had severe pain in my right flank side, upper right shoulder and middle back. The sweating was unbelievable and the pain so intense it truly felt I was going to die. Nothing helped except waiting for a click type sensation in the middle of my upper belly/sternum area and then INSTANT relief as if nothing had ever happened. I always had severe nausea and diarrhoea with the attacks.

Had all the tests and then eventually two years after it all began they found mobile gallbladder stones (much to their surprise). I had gone in for an unrelated abdominal ultrasound. My own reading indicated it might be gallstone stuck in the tubing. Just based on that clicking sensation (as if something had cleared). I tell you the way it was instant relief was almost like I did die and now there was no pain, no nausea - just instant well being. Very bizarre.

It could have been a colic type attack as well of which I don't remember the name.

The only reason I mention any of this is because even though the gallbladder is now gone and has been for three years I can still experience mild flank pain if I've eaten too much cheese. The liver will still kick out bile and some people can have gallbladder symptoms without a gallbladder. I wonder if the contrast they gave you caused such a body reaction. I don't know, I'm merely putting it out as another thing to be aware of.

Take care and I hope you never have to experience such pain again. There is simply nothing to describe such pain except pure blinding agony. All you can do is focus on the pain it is so bad. When I say that I mean you focus on the pain because it becomes your absolute being at the time. Just can't express that pain.

Check this link out: biliary colic and spinchter of odi (plus other info) Might help
edit on 8/9/14 by ccseagull because: (no reason given)
en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 8/9/14 by ccseagull because: (no reason given)


www.nytimes.com...
edit on 8/9/14 by ccseagull because: added links



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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I've found that spicy foods seem to help when you've had your gallbladder removed.

Also, Triphala (Indian Ayervedic medicine) keeps my bowels happy. It's pretty amazing stuff!



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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That's really weird with the Zantac. I take prescription strength Naproxen which is basically Aleve, and I've never had a peep out of my insurance over it being OTC so take it that way.

Now, I have had the number issue before with my Zomig. The insurance doesn't see why I would need more than the six they will typically cover in a month, but since I have chronic migraine, my neurologist writes for 10. So, we have to jump through hoops to get a 6-month special dispensation to get the extra number every month. Since my migraines have gotten back under control, my husband and I have stopped fighting it since it's been a long time since I've actually needed more than two or three at most in a month.

But basically, some insurance companies do get suspicious if you want more covered than they consider "normal," and it's not that you can't get them to cover the extra often, but that you have to jump through hoops to get it forced through. So, if it's a one-shot deal, it's often not worth it.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 06:55 PM
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originally posted by: gmoneystunt
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Just a suggestion. Do you think you could possibly have a allergy to iodine or possibly any of the other ingredients of Gastrografin?

meglumine diatrizoate and/or sodium diatrizoate the active ingredients in Gastrografin e.g. iodine

Funny thing is they asked me if I had an allergies to iodine and I said no because I had never had anything with it before so I didn't know if I did or not.


In hypersensitive patients, exposure to iodine may cause a rash (contact dermatitis), hives (when ingested), or, very rarely, anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition that requires emergency medical attention.

I did have a small rash on my arms but it went away and they didn't think anything of it.


Consequently, idiosyncratic contrast reactions are best termed "anaphylactoid" "allergy-like," or "pseudoallergic," rather than "allergic."

Symptoms of anaphylaxis include:
abdominal pain, confusion, diarrhea, dizziness, difficulty breathing, heart palpitations, hives (along with other symptoms), lightheadedness, nausea or vomiting, rapid pulse


I had severe abdominal pain, confusion for sure, very dizzy, couldn't breathe to the point I needed oxygen, my pulse was sky high. I was very nauseous and light headed. I was seeing stars and felt like I was going to throw up!

I guess maybe it was an allergic reaction to iodine.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: tigertatzen
a reply to: mblahnikluver

Barium is not typically given for an abdominal CT, just fyi. They gave you exactly what is typically given for that test. Sounds like maybe it was a little too acidic for you on top of an already upset stomach and it caused some cramping. What type of a cholecystectomy did you undergo? Recovery is usually six weeks for laparoscopy and even longer if they have to make a long incision. And what had you been eating prior to the issue? That was likely your problem right there, unfortunately.

Just to say it was not some cramping. I was the worst pain I'd ever felt, even worse than labor. I wish it was just an upset stomach!

I had a laparoscopic procedure to remove my gallbladder. I have been eating the diet they told me to which is low fat and veggies. I think I had some rice earlier in the day. I hadn't had food in hours before I went to the hospital because I had been taking a nap. I woke up to make some meatballs for my husband and son and it just hit me in the kitchen. I drink lots of water and I wasn't taking any meds for the surgery because they only gave me meds for a few days. Other than tenderness and tightening of the abdomen here and there I felt fine.




I hope they told you that you can no longer eat like you did before the surgery...without excess bile to break down fatty acids, you can experience something called "dumping syndrome", and it causes severe cramping, usually accompanied by severe diarrhea and vomiting. You will no longer have the ability to eat whatever you want; you'll have to be careful until your digestive system adjusts and that can take up to a year.

I am on the American Diabetic Association Diet basically. My doctor told me to go on that for my hypoglycemia. I pretty much already ate that way anyway. I dont eat processed foods and I dont eat any kind of junk food. I buy organic and eat a pretty balanced diet. The only thing I miss are EGGS! I want quiche! I made one, but messed it up which is a first and I was afraid to try it due to the severe pain I would get prior to my gallbladder being removed. I will wait and see. I know many people who had their gallbladder removed who said they could go back to eating what they wanted and others who had to change their diet and couldn't eat many things they use to. It's funny how when you mention your gallbladder being removed how many people just opening share their gallbladder stories. lol So far everything I ate prior has been fine. If I can't eat eggs again it will truly suck because omelets and quiche are my favorite breakfast item and I'm known for my quiches!!

On a side note I also have interstitial cystitis which I was just diagnosed with last week. I never had a bladder problem before I was pregnant. It all started after. It truly sucks and the crazy thing is my identical twin sister has the same thing. We have A LOT of the same health conditions. With the IC I have to be even more restrictive with my diet which isn't so bad because a lot of what I'm limited to I don't eat or already cut out due to the diet my doctor put me on months ago.



This info should have been given to you upon discharge from your surgery, so you may want to go back and read your discharge instructions again. Stay away from fatty foods, dairy, etc...should all be laid out for you in your paperwork. Your body cannot process certain foods anymore. The reaction you described is typical in patients who do not observe dietary caution post-op, and is extremely common...makes no sense that no one there knew what was happening to you, unless you were in a hospital that has never had a post-op patient before, which is highly unlikely even in the most rural areas.

I already know this. I read the discharge papers thoroughly. I don't eat a fatty diet because I can't. I don't drink dairy. The only milk I buy is Almond Milk and even that is only really used on my oatmeal or in cooking. I cut WAY back on my cheese, which is a guilty pleasure of mine. I dont eat cheese like I use to. I was queen of baked mac and cheese but I haven't made it in months. I have made it for my son or husband but I have only limited myself to literally one or two bites.

The hospital I was in is a huge highly rated hospital. I was there on a Saturday night and they were very busy, not saying that is ok for them to not know what was going on but things happen. They did their best and I was fine once I as given the one pain medication and I just relaxed. I was on an IV and once they got my CT Scan results back they released me because everything was fine. There were no signs of anything on the scan. I was told it was just post op pain and that was it. I haven't had it since. The only thing I can maybe think of is I laid on my stomach that day at the chiropractor for my adjustment but other than that i have nothing! I don't know if lying directly on my stomach caused any potential pain or what. I have been sleeping on my back since the surgery.


The reaction you described is typical in patients who do not observe dietary caution post-op, and is extremely common..

Sorry but this is just not true. I know how to eat and I get insulted when people assume I don't. I'm a grown woman and can easily follow directions. I am also very anal about following doctors orders when it comes to surgery and what to do and not do afterwards. I had my surgery a week prior to what had happened so I doubt food had anything to do with it esp since I had only been eating veggies, some chicken and rice and only drinking water.


Thank you very much for your reply. I really appreciate it! You must work in the medical field



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 07:19 PM
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originally posted by: Mirthful Me
Sorry to hear about your adverse event with the oral CT contrast, but abdominal cramping is fairly common with Gastrografin, especially if you are dehydrated (often problematic due to the preferred NPO status for abdominal imaging). I think it is unlikely to be any kind of iodine sensitivity as those issues manifest differently, and your providers would have taken different measures to treat the onset of iodine anaphylaxis.

OMG it's that common to have that kind of cramping? I mean it was worse than labor pains, no joke. I doubt I was dehydrated because I drink a lot of water. I have a water bottle that I fill and I think it's 32oz and I fill it about 3-4 times a day. All I drink is water.

I don't know about iodine, this was the first time I've ever had it. I remember calling the nurse and barely being able to breathe and get the words out. It was not an experience I ever want to go through and if they ever want me to do contrast again I will definitely say no way!


If you haven't already seen it, here is an information sheet: Gastrografin

This should not be confused with the manufacturer's insert, which is here.

You can report adverse events at FDA MedWatch or by calling 1-800-FDA-1088.

Gastrografin is pretty much the gold standard in prepped and unprepped cross sectional abdominal imaging, and should you be faced with another exam, please inform the providers of your past experience.


Thank you for those links! I will definitely check them out!! I didn't realize you could report such events. I wonder if the hospital did.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

I'm sorry but I don't think you seem to realize. It was NOT SOME CRAMPING!!

I wouldn't need oxygen and be unable to breathe or even move with just some cramping. It was SEVERE abdominal pain that tightened up my abdomen where my diaphragm is and it radiated to my back. It was the worst pain I have ever felt. Also my stomach was empty as was everything else in my scan so it wasn't constipation either.

I was given Dilaudid but no zofran. I was given a prescription for zofran.

You are also extremely insulting and it takes a lot to offend me. I DO and DID follow post op instructions with diet. How dare you assume otherwise. I didn't come here for your judgement. I get enough of that from the medical community. Not everyone eats junk food and doesnt' follow doctors orders. It is really annoying when people just assume things without even knowing the person.

I appreciate your responses but stop making assumptions that are not true.



posted on Sep, 8 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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originally posted by: ccseagull
a reply to: mblahnikluver

I'm so glad you are feeling better. What you expressed in terms of pain is the exact type of gallbladder attacks I used to get. Couldn't breath in because it was too painful so short shallow breaths, the abdominal pain right behind the sternum. I also had severe pain in my right flank side, upper right shoulder and middle back. The sweating was unbelievable and the pain so intense it truly felt I was going to die. Nothing helped except waiting for a click type sensation in the middle of my upper belly/sternum area and then INSTANT relief as if nothing had ever happened. I always had severe nausea and diarrhoea with the attacks.

I had quite a few gallbladder attacks before i had it removed last week. The crazy thing is all the things you mentioned went away when it was taken out! No shoulder pain, no pain behind the eye and everything else that went with it. My doctor even said I will feel much better afterwards and honestly I feel great! I was so miserable for months because I had to go through all these tests and see far too many GI doctors for them all to tell me the same thing. I got a bill today for my 5min visit with the surgeon who did my gallbladder removal and it was over $200! All he did was say ok it needs to come out and set a date! I guess that's just how things are here.


Had all the tests and then eventually two years after it all began they found mobile gallbladder stones (much to their surprise). I had gone in for an unrelated abdominal ultrasound. My own reading indicated it might be gallstone stuck in the tubing. Just based on that clicking sensation (as if something had cleared). I tell you the way it was instant relief was almost like I did die and now there was no pain, no nausea - just instant well being. Very bizarre.

Oh wow! That sounds painful! I never had any gallstones. My problems all started after my last surgery in May. I went to the hospital and doctors and they kept saying it was gastroenteritis, which I knew i wasn't. Finally I got a doctor who listened and ordered all kinds of tests and then we knew what it was.




It could have been a colic type attack as well of which I don't remember the name.

The only reason I mention any of this is because even though the gallbladder is now gone and has been for three years I can still experience mild flank pain if I've eaten too much cheese. The liver will still kick out bile and some people can have gallbladder symptoms without a gallbladder. I wonder if the contrast they gave you caused such a body reaction. I don't know, I'm merely putting it out as another thing to be aware of.

I don't know either. I've been goggling the last two days and it seems i"m not the only one who had this reaction yet nobody had answers either. When I call my GI doctor tomorrow who did the surgery and see him I will ask him about it as well. I want to know for further reference because I dont want to take that stuff ever again!



Take care and I hope you never have to experience such pain again. There is simply nothing to describe such pain except pure blinding agony. All you can do is focus on the pain it is so bad. When I say that I mean you focus on the pain because it becomes your absolute being at the time. Just can't express that pain.

Oh it started as mild cramping which was fine and then in like seconds it went from mild to severe and crippling. I even held off calling the nurse but when I started to have a hard time breathing I called them. It was a good thing I knew my nurse, childhood friend, because she was really sweet at calming me down and making me feel comfortable. It is nothing I ever want to experience again. Like I said I'd rather do labor again and that sucked!


Check this link out: biliary colic and spinchter of odi (plus other info) Might help en.wikipedia.org...

www.nytimes.com...

I will definitely check these out, thank you!!




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