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Exploited by an employer then refused a good reference...revenge is sweet.

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posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: yeahright

In legal terms, I agree with you and the OP actually. No, it's not right to take advantage. Yes, it's the employer's responsibility to uphold the laws that are in place to protect children in the work place.


Whether or not there was good reason for his termination, which acted as a catalyst for the "sweet revenge" lawsuit on the other hand, we'll never know. It just blows my mind that people would actually post on an internet forum to gloat about their fat and juicy lawsuit, along with only sharing their side of the story and not all of the facts.




posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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I'm sure you will pursue the case no matter what we say. However, your son is missing a lesson here. He was told twice before to do X, and whether you deem it important is irrelevant because it is their policy. Do you propose they should just keep letting him F up because he works long hours? What good is working long hours if you don't follow policies and don't correct your actions after being warned twice?

You'll probably get a settlement and the case will be soon forgotten by all, but as long as you and your son think you can break policy repeatedly with impunity, he will get fired again, and by then he may no longer be a minor. He'll just have a spotty record and the settlement will have been spent long ago. Sounds like you're teaching him sour grapes.

a reply to: grainofsand



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: Iamthatbish
YOU JUST MADE GRAINS POINT. The child isn't mature or an adult.




He may not be an adult, but I see a lot of maturity--more than many adults. It would be nice if he was let to be his own man on this one.


He didn't bitch about it when he came home, he knew he'd not been careful enough about giving the prick ammunition to fire him, so deleted that employment period from his CV/resume as a life lesson.

edit on 5-9-2014 by Halfswede because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: yeahright
Exactly how I saw the whole thing.
Neither me or my lad would have complained about child labour law being broken if the particular director had just agreed to give him a good reference for his work to a future employer. He refused.
His sacking was a personal thing by an adult wanting to screw him over due to alpha male issues.
If an individual or business are passionate about enforcing rules then said individual or business must ensure they are equally following employee care rules at the same time. The law is the law after all...rules are a two way street.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t
It was wearing a wrist bracelet underneath and hidden by the company issued jacket/coat.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: parad0x122
Why not?
The employer knowingly broke the law and one particular director screwed him over because he didn't like him.
I'm shocked that so many replies support employers who breal child labour laws and then support company directors who fire workers inspired by personal reasons.
Is payback so bad, or do y'all just accept whatever an employer wants to enforce as it suits them?



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: lindalinda

The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I see what you're saying and ordinarily would agree. However in this instance as the facts have been relayed the kid was picked on from the first and he gutted it out and worked all the hours he was given doing what no one else wanted to. From my (maybe incorrect) perception, this martinet jerk of a boss couldn't break him, so he fired the kid for trivial but to-the-letter valid reasons.

Fine. You want to the letter adherence, then you damn well better be delivering it in the other direction.

This is how a good many companies (especially large ones) treat employees. There's a near incomprehensible set of contradictory 'rules' in the company manual that if you follow them, ensure you can't fulfill the requirements of the job. So you're either always in jeopardy of not following some rule or not meeting a standard. That way they can always have 'cause' for termination.

Now most companies have no desire to fire people who are a company asset, but every once in awhile, some Captain Bligh moron will overstep and mess with the wrong person. I think that's what's happened here. And unfortunately, his hands aren't clean.

Boo hoo.

I hope he gets everything he has coming to him.

edit on 9/5/2014 by yeahright because: Typo
extra DIV



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: Krazysh0t
It was wearing a wrist bracelet underneath and hidden by the company issued jacket/coat.



So a dress code violation was broken 3 times? Hidden but somehow seen.

Seems fair to me. Even as an adult it could be cause for firing. Can't wear the uniform correctly, don't work there.

Peace



edit on 5-9-2014 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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A hidden wrist bracelet doesn't sound like a big deal, but it really depends on what industry he was working in. Around my neck of the woods, oilfield is the king of employment and the people who work in the oilfields aren't allowed to wear rings - even their wedding bands - because it's dangerous to the employee.

I knew one guy who refused to take off his wedding ring at work. Then he jumped off the top of a big truck and caught his ring on the truck on the way down. It ripped his finger from his hand. Needless, to say, he won't be wearing his wedding ring again any time soon.

My younger brother works in a filter factory. No rings or bracelets allowed as it could get hung and drag your hand into the machine, which would then rip the hand off in excruciating fashion.

Obviously, since we don't know what industry your son was working in, we don't know if this rule was just part of a dress code or if it was for safety reasons.

Not that I don't agree with your situation, I'm just saying that there may have been a very good reason for such a "stupid" rule.

Eta: Regardless, it sounds like your son's firing was for personal reasons, and I can't get behind that. Personal feelings should be left out of the work place. And I agree with the poster above who said something to the effect of throwing stones from glass houses. They should have made sure they were following the laws before firing a good employee for not following their rules. I would have probably turned them in too.
edit on 5-9-2014 by DustbowlDebutante because: add



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

Thank you for being transparent, I really was expecting something totally different for the reason he was fired.

It sounds like a really bad stroke of luck as far as who his manager/boss was, for starters. Legally, it sounds like you have all of the documentation necessary to win the case. I would just hope that, in addition to whatever compensation you/he are granted, your son realizes one other thing: at the end of the day when this is all said and done, there will always be #ty bosses. Exiting a job is never easy, and a good referral is never a given. Unfortunately, I doubt that even the settlement will fill the gap in his CV that the employer created by acting so childishly though. :-/



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: lindalinda
No, you're missing the point that my son was singled out for personal reasons by the particular company director, not the breaking of rules per se.
Why do you support the business breaking child labour laws but support the company rules??
Why do most of the replies in this thread?
Are company rules more important than child labour law to ATS members? Lol, it seems so.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: Halfswede

I had the impression grain is teaching the child how to not be a doormat. Personally my children are a bit younger and, I tell them what to do and only step in when they falter.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: interupt42
Oh pathetic one liner comment, it was based on an assessment of why the director had alpha male issues.
If you don't understand that directors/managers are ever influenced by such things then you don't understand human males, or live in a world where no such issues are ever experienced.


Ofcourse I don't know you , your son or the director nor the actual events but from the comment you madeI find it hard to believe that the director might be the one or the only one with alpha male issues.

I have been in numerous fights in my life and was raised to never take any cr@p from anyone. When friends got picked on by bullies in school they would come to me for help so I'm pretty versed on the alpha male.

However, I never looked for fights and I surely never had a mentality where I would anyalize coworkers based on whether I could beat them up or not.

Being that your son is 16 and from your comment I think perhaps its POSSIBLE that your son had a typical 16 year old maturilty level and maybe watched to many MMA fights. Then perhaps did not have the best work place attitude or mentality. Which than the director looked for ways to document and fire your son.

Like I said that is ONLY my observation and I'm NOT claiming any of it as facts or as the actual events. Take it as you will. However, I think you should concentrate on better coping mechanisms if you dont see a problem with sizing up your coworkers for a fight or putting any significance into that. Good luck to you and your Son.



edit on 51930America/ChicagoFri, 05 Sep 2014 15:51:49 -0500000000p3042 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: parad0x122
Totally agreed, we've spoken at length about complying if you are working for someone, but we all know that many minor rules are ignored by most workers, but an unkind manager can pick on individual employers if they have a personal issue. That is what happened in this case.
They broke the law, knowingly and repeatedly, and as they are so passionate about rule breaking then I am happy for the legal process to take it's course.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:53 PM
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If you break the same rule three times, the employer is in his right to reconsider your employment. Chalk it up to not being perceived as an "it getter."

Cell phone is a minor rule, and three warnings in a three mo.th period could very well get ypu fired. Especially in a seasonal imdustry.

Your case is legit...but show good leadership by not dismissing a failure to learn. Domt minimize the mistakes that cost him his job. All kids are hard headed....nothing wrong with it.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I think you're missing the way you represented yourself in your OP.

You came across sounding victimized, yet made it very clear that the two of you had no problem taking advantage of the same circumstance you're complaining about when the getting was good.

You can't have both.

Like I said before, legally, hands down the employer was wrong. Morally speaking however, multiple parties involved really didn't excel in any regard. Your son worked under the table and he knew it. You allowed him to do so until he was fired over a technicality, which would understandably anger any parent. His employer reaped the benefits of a young, hard worker, who just wanted to make a few bucks.

IMO, your son was the only one who seemed to handle this entire situation with character.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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Why is this on the board on ATS?

My dad would have laughed at me and told me to get another job.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: kdyam
My son could not legally agree to work those hours and the employer knew it when they broke the law.
The employer used BS rules to fire him at the end of the season and now their failure to follow legislation is an example of my son pulling them up for failing to follow legislation that they are required to follow themselves.



So if I was to rob store that illegally sold jewelry, and I knew they illegally sold it, and they did as well, if they called the police who would be in trouble? I would think the we both would.

The company was exploiting your son as much as your son was exploiting the company. That is what I would call a wash.. but morals not standing,,,, you guys decide to press the case... even after your son was fired for violating a KNOWN rule 3 TIMES? and you cry foul?

I am truly amazed.. more at the fact that you are smugly posting this.... but more at the problem people like you and your son represent in our world.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: jude11
No, at the end of his shift he was asked to remove his work jacket and the offending bracelet was then visible. It was a spot check/sting. The director knew exactly what he was doing and waited for the end of the shift to sting my lad.
There were no health or safety issues with the bracelet and it was only seen after the director asked him to remove his jacket. Why do you seem so supportive of this and an employer which is happy to break child employment laws?



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: kdyam
Nope, just saying that employers must follow child employment laws if they are enforcing BS company regulations in a fascist style.


Company regulations are company regulations, just like laws are laws. You follow them or you don't. If you don't follow them you get fired or arrested, if you do follow them then you are in the clear.




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