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U.S. Military fighters trailing unresp. aircraft in Atlantic... UPDATE: Plane crashed near Jamaica

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posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: Libertygal

First, let me assure you that "wealth envy" is laughable, at best. I'm pretty well off myself.

Sooo, if "Dead is dead" they why protest against the 3 who died? Their dead, like you just said.
How about we see some greater threads about how to help their families? See that, I can focus on other things besides starving people....

..we won't even bring up the homeless running amok....and other, such, issues that i don't seem to care about.....

You seem like your more in-sensitivities to this than i am..."Life goes on".

I give credit to many of people. How dare you judge me character from just one topic, that i clearly established my caring abroad.




posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: Libertygal

Just the opposite. Outflow valve failures are so subtle that by the time you realize there's a problem, you're already hypoxic, and incapacitated to the point that you either never realise there's a problem, or you no longer have the coordination to put the mask on.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

So who wants to do a startup? I'll sell you the idea for a portion of profits.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:39 PM
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originally posted by: TechniXcality
a reply to: MissBeck

I know exactly how you feel thats why I feel like we should be able to plane snatch. So we dont have to watch people die helplessly what a blight on us as a society


I'd think it would be reasonable to have the autopilot drop the plane down to a level with enough oxygen to maintain consciousness in the event that a loss of cabin pressure was detected.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: jude11

Possibly same plot as flight 370...



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: Libertygal

In certain situations it can be rapid.. but that's not the dangerous one.

Dangerous would be a steady leak that slowly over whelms the planes ability to keep enough O2 in the plane for people to stay conscious.

I had been through training the average pilot never sees, and had the added responsibility of being responsible for the pressurization systems on top of the rest of my job.

the loss of pressurization we had still wasn't caught till we were at 10k on climb out, tried resetting automatic, and tried to control it in manual but the outflow valve failed.

In a small plane like that, the pilot has to monitor everything... and if you haven't gone through the chamber you probably only have the vaguest idea what your hypoxia symptoms are, it would be very very easy to miss.

Last point... hypoxia hits everyone differently... I went 6 mins at 24 thousand feet with no supplemental o2 before I lost the capability for coherent thought... others in the chamber were nearly unconscious in less than 2 mins. he might have never had time to realize what was wrong.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:41 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

post removed by staff


Never mind, that's an even better idea. Have it descend and circle.
edit on Fri Sep 5 2014 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

Isn't there some sort of audible alarm indicating that oxygen levels have fallen to an unsafe level?



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Ha I wish... I just don't have the time, moving in 2 weeks to Europe...

Stupid thing, some former co-workers actually have the connections to get the engineer portion of it done.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Libertygal

It depends on the event. Pilots go through hypoxia training all the time with no long term affects. There are a lot of factors that come into play with hypoxia.


I can agree, to an extent.

One would think an event big enough to cause loss of consciousness of the pilot and apparently all on board was dramatic enough to cause severe brain injury.

Even a person in a diabetic coma that has short hypoxic events of two to three minutes can suffer severe brain damage.

Now, if you are speaking of mild hypoxia, such as a person may suffer during a sleep apnea event, then I can agree. But, sleep apnea events do not cause a loss of consciousness. That usually means an O2 desat to about 89-90%, in more severe case, into the 70% range, but, anything below 60% sats, sustained, will result in brain damage in short time.

So, one can thereby consider this event was far more drastic. I am certain anyone on that flight that was awake would likely have been able to radio for help, or wave at the military jets, something.

You generally would not be a participant in flights like that in a total vaccuum, negligent of what actions to take in an emergency, unless perhaps it was your first flight on a private plane.

edit on 5-9-2014 by Libertygal because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

Not on any plane I have flown on, it was probably in the plans at some point for commercial and it got scrapped do to costs.

that's my guess anyways.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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Update: Larry Glazer and his wife Jane have been confirmed as passengers on the small aircraft that crashed in Jamaica this afternoon. There is no immediate information on the life status of the passengers. Pictured: Larry Glazer, right, of Buckingham Properties, with Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren.

The plot thickens.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf
Very good points. It would also vary, depending on overall health, as well. People that are athletic, and generally excellent health, would desat slower, due to a healthier heart.

However, this had to be a drastic event, due to the frosted windows, correct? As well as the length of time the pilot was presumed uncionscious?



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:51 PM
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originally posted by: SirKonstantin
a reply to: parad0x122

Read below your thread....

Thousands of people are starving and dying daily of hunger....but hey, lets gives these guys some well deserved media attention. right?
3 well off "offed" citizens deserve more attention than starving children across the world.
Sorry if i seem insensitive....


So we should start up a news network. 24 hours of starving children programming. What are the chances of success there? We could call it the SCN: Starving Children Network.

2 things would result: People would become numb to starving children and the news network broadcasting 24 hours of starvation news would go out of business.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:53 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Libertygal

Just the opposite. Outflow valve failures are so subtle that by the time you realize there's a problem, you're already hypoxic, and incapacitated to the point that you either never realise there's a problem, or you no longer have the coordination to put the mask on.


Wow,.sorry, but that seems backwards, and needs a change, doesn't it?

Strange, that's something that simply seems to go unaddressed, IMO.

Sucha simple safety issue to address, yet, it remains unrsolved, though it has obvious faults. Kind of silly.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

Commercial aircraft have configuration warnings, and pressurization warnings that pop in the cockpit, but they don't always worth. The 737 that crashed in Athens because of the outflow valve had multiple warnings, and the crew radioed maintenance and kept climbing.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: Libertygal

Only depressurization event I was a part of outside the chamber the windows didn't frost over, but we were back on the ground pretty quick (30-40 mins), and it was a much larger plane (AWACS/707).

anything I say would just be a guess... with that said... I would guess a plane that small would probably frost over pretty quick at altitude once the failure had gone on long enough..



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

Wow. Handheld/clip-on models are pretty cheap (this one is $99):

BW Honeywell GasAlert Clip Extreme Oxygen Monitor



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: bbracken677

And are you not numb to this sort of event? Or any event to that matter? It is just sad to see the brain washing away the care and love in this world.

We still have Malaysians crying for their lost ones. Planes crash, we've seen them happen a lot. and after some time or a bigger news arises, it'll be swept under the rug.

Are you saying that we should just Troll along this train wreck just because its what is to be expected of us?

We sure do live in a sad world sir.

btw, you have read my re-summed up version of what you quoted? right? i think its better than my first remark.
edit on th00Fri, 05 Sep 2014 15:00:01 -0500K201490130pm9 by SirKonstantin because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: Libertygal

The outflow valve opens to the outside to equalize pressure on the ground primarily. If it isn't closed manually by flipping a switch, or put into automatic if that's an option, then the aircraft can't pressurize, because there's nothing to hold the air in the cabin. Usually an outflow valve issue is the result of crew error, as they are remarkably simple and pretty bulletproof.
edit on 9/5/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



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