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NIH Scientist Martin Rogers Found Dead

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posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: Maluhia

It seems like every time there's a scientist involved or some other high end researcher, they end up dying without any witnesses. To me, it just seems too convenient that these people end their lives quietly without relatives or spouses having a clue they've been depressed or were acting out of character.




posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 10:57 PM
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Source: en.wikipedia.org...


Pre-Clinical Drug Development

In drug development, pre-clinical development, also named preclinical studies and nonclinical studies, is a stage of research that begins before clinical trials (testing in humans) can begin, and during which important feasibility, iterative testing and drug safety data is collected.

The main goals of pre-clinical studies are to determine a product's ultimate safety profile. Products may include new or iterated or like-kind medical devices, drugs, gene therapy solutions, etc.


STM



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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So he'll be added to the list of anomalous virologist/scientist deaths?

I seriously think these people rebel in some way or slip up and it's a severe warning to all in the know. S + F



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 11:07 PM
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www.frostburg.edu...


The Ebola vaccine zmapp is grown in tobacco plants. This school is 20 mins tops from where this man died.

I don't like it. University of Maryland has an environmental sciences building on the same exit off of 68 as FSU.

That man had a reason to be here.



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 11:21 PM
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originally posted by: Yeahkeepwatchingme
So he'll be added to the list of anomalous virologist/scientist deaths?

I seriously think these people rebel in some way or slip up and it's a severe warning to all in the know. S + F


I am not sure how complete Steve Quayle's list list is but it is here



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 11:35 PM
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Looking through his scholarly related articles it indicates he was focused on emerging, parasite-related, tropical diseases. So, I'm wondering if he was working on anything related to....

www.cdc.gov...



There was also an article on toxoplasmosis, which is not new. As well as another on eukaryotic pathogens.
edit on 9/4/2014 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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originally posted by: Maluhia
a reply to: stormcell

Interesting, I didn't know about that.

What came to my mind initially, were the gulf oil spill scientists who met with some untimely ends as well.


Here is a complete list:

www.rense.com...

Now, we don't have a similar number of deaths with famous people in technology. Perhaps the most famous was Seymour Cray, whose 4x4 overturned when he wasn't wearing a seatbelt.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:06 AM
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originally posted by: kosmicjack
Looking through his scholarly related articles it indicates he was focused on emerging, parasite-related, tropical diseases. So, I'm wondering if he was working on anything related to....

www.cdc.gov...



There was also an article on toxoplasmosis, which is not new. As well as another on eukaryotic pathogens.


I was taking a look at that as well.
Just for everyone's reference on your link to chikungunya if they don't know...
News Doctors In U.S. On High Alert For Chikungunya Virus
Experimental chikungunya vaccine shows promise



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:09 AM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: Maluhia

It seems like every time there's a scientist involved or some other high end researcher, they end up dying without any witnesses. To me, it just seems too convenient that these people end their lives quietly without relatives or spouses having a clue they've been depressed or were acting out of character.


Of course, it never ever happens to low profile people. You think "scientists involved or some other high end researchers" are immune to unattended death? Immune to the stresses and pitfalls of life that us nobodies are subject to?
edit on 9/5/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:15 AM
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I don't believe he was murdered and here's why:

He went to the hotel on his own and left on his own. No other person went in the room before or while he was there;

he did not ask anyone for help even though he was sighted at the canal;

he did not go to a hospital for help;

he did not call anyone that we know of though he had plenty of opportunity.

And the most telling bit is that he acted as though he was in a quarantine.

His job was to help with the development of pre-clinical drugs to stave the onset of parasitical diseases. The only way to test it is to give it to someone with the disease.

Something happened at the lab, maybe his director wasn't convinced to go ahead with human trials so he took matters into his own hands and tested it on himself?

Until the coroner's report comes out we don't know. And even after hearing the coroner's report we will wonder if it was watered down so as not to alarm us.

And if I were him and knew I had some incurable painful disease and that my miracle drug that I had been working on did not work I would probably take a cocktail of drugs and drift off.

Or, for the true conspiracy theorists out there he was murdered by someone who didn't want the drug he was working on released. But really that would not explain his self-quarantine? And it would not stop the release of the new drug.

STM




edit on 5-9-2014 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:17 AM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: Maluhia
a reply to: stormcell

Interesting, I didn't know about that.

What came to my mind initially, were the gulf oil spill scientists who met with some untimely ends as well.


Here is a complete list:

www.rense.com...

Now, we don't have a similar number of deaths with famous people in technology. Perhaps the most famous was Seymour Cray, whose 4x4 overturned when he wasn't wearing a seatbelt.


A list only going to January 2005 is not complete. Note Steve Quayle's List is up-to-date (not including Rogers) though I'm not sure if it is all inclusive.

I wonder if we could track down a list for technologists?

FYI: Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) has a good list from 1992 onward of dead journalists broken down by country, year, and beat covered here.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: seentoomuch




But really that would not explain his self-quarantine?

A "self-quarantine" does not seem like a very likely scenario. If he knew he was infected it would make more sense to subject himself to a real quarantine rather than risk infecting anyone else. Not to mention obtaining treatment...which works.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: seentoomuch




But really that would not explain his self-quarantine?

A "self-quarantine" does not seem like a very likely scenario. If he knew he was infected it would make more sense to subject himself to a real quarantine rather than risk infecting anyone else. Not to mention obtaining treatment.
edit on 9/5/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: Phage

He would lose his medical license, true?

ETA, so therefore he would also lose his position at NIH, his job, his livelihood and perhaps his purpose in life as he saw it. Pretty grim.

But I have to admit I'm not 100% on this theory but I do put it in the 90%+ area. There could've been many levers that sent him off on his own. Perhaps his phone was hacked and lots of incriminating photos with him and a little boy were found? Perhaps he was being blackmailed for whatever. I'm just going with his job description to gain insight but it's not 100%.

STM


edit on 5-9-2014 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: seentoomuch

If that is what happened it wasn't just bad luck that he thought this area was far enough away from his family. When there's an accident on the highway to DC we get stuck until its moved. This area can be quarantined. Cumberland is in a valley and the county past Allegany (Garrett farther away from DC) is even less populated. With the same highway issues.

I still don't like it. I certainly don't trust it.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: seentoomuch
He was a licensed doctor? You know that the title "doctor" goes with a PhD? There are a lot of doctors that don't have medical licenses.
www.niaid.nih.gov...

Would he lose his license if he was a medical doctor? Why?

edit on 9/5/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: Phage


You're right, I thought it was not allowed in new drug development but now I find that it is common, especially at the NIH which I find disturbing especially if he was working on a deadly form of parasite or even virus or phage.

Source:


The Approval Process

Sir Michael Rawlins, chairman of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and senior fellow at the Academy of Medical Sciences, has recently chaired a working party at the academy, which published the report A new pathway for the regulation and governance of health research, recommending ways to streamline the research approval process in the UK.

Professor Rawlins' first encounter with self experimenting was in the 1960s. "The very first experiment I did on myself was giving myself a fever and then seeing if I could lower it with intravenous aspirin." He and colleagues infused themselves with bacteria and tested the effects of intravenous aspirin. After undertaking further studies, they showed that the aspirin lowered temperature via the central nervous system rather than by blocking the formation of proteins.

Professor Rawlins told the Student BMJ: "I've done it all my life, I've lost count really! I've given myself all sorts of medicines, collected blood samples, saliva samples, done various tests on myself." In a recent interview about the report on the Today programme on Radio 4, Professor Rawlins highlighted the use of self experimentation saying: "You've also got to remember that investigators often investigate themselves." He went on to say: "I've done dozens of studies on myself and I'm in reasonably good shape still. And we wouldn't—most of us—do anything to other people that we wouldn't do to ourselves."


And as for Phds calling themselves doctors, well I consider them posers as my husband did. He had a Phd. in law from UT Law and he laughed at anyone that would put Dr. on their business card when it was a Phd.

I highly respect your opinion, what do you think happened, Phage?

STM



Note: The NIH in the quote is talking about the UK. Do they have a NIH also or does the U.S. NIH work with them on projects?

Oh, and I realize that we cross posted. On my last post I was editing while you were responding to it in original form, sorry 'bout that.

Note to myself: Do not take on Phage when you've had a couple of glasses of wine.
edit on 5-9-2014 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: seentoomuch

You're right, I thought it was not allowed in new drug development but now I find that it is common, especially at the NIH which I find disturbing especially if he was working on a deadly form of parasite or even virus or phage.
Don't you know? Bacteriophages are good things. Are you suggesting that he infected himself with a transmittable and deadly disease then "quarantined" himself by checking into a hotel? That really doesn't make much sense.

I have no problem with someone who has earned a PhD putting the title Dr in front of their name. Dr in front, PhD after, no difference to me. In many cases it takes more work to get that PhD than it does to get a medical diploma.



I highly respect your opinion, what do you think happened, Phage?
I try to avoid forming opinions based on such very little information.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 01:16 AM
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originally posted by: Iamthatbish
www.frostburg.edu...


The Ebola vaccine zmapp is grown in tobacco plants. This school is 20 mins tops from where this man died.

I don't like it. University of Maryland has an environmental sciences building on the same exit off of 68 as FSU.

That man had a reason to be here.


The Ebola vaccine given to patients recently was manufactured in Owensboro, Kentucky. That's in far western Kentucky, nowhere near Maryland.
www.kentucky.com...

It seems that this fellow was interested in parasitic diseases of a tropical nature. There's far more biology in that field rather than virology as in Ebola.

What I found interesting was the wife's comment, "...the best answer we have is that my husband is distressed." Now, had I been that interviewer, I would have had to ask, "Distressed about what?"



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 01:24 AM
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Only one Hotel has footage of him? For two weeks?

Thats a long time to go AWOL. Only two things in my mind make men do that.



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