Is this normal during clinical therapy?

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posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 09:19 PM
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originally posted by: NarcolepticBuddha

originally posted by: PLAYERONE01
a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha
excellent example of cynicism right there in your edit.



Actually I edited to give him a little more deserved credit. Perhaps my word choice was more passive than it ought to be though. And yes, that's just it, small things like conscious or unconscious word choice may be revealing in a way I can't see objectively.



I'm sorry but i just cannot see how you can come to that conclusion. your last sentence is clearly laced with sarcasm toward your psych, has pessimistic overtones and shows your cynicism towards your treatment as a whole.
I fail to see where you actually gave the guy any credit, it seemed more like a snarky little whip because you were given some homework on summer break, as if the guy isn't doing his job!



So, this is probably a good sign of his involvement and commitment eh? Doling out homework.




posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 09:51 PM
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originally posted by: PLAYERONE01
I'm sorry but i just cannot see how you can come to that conclusion. your last sentence is clearly laced with sarcasm toward your psych, has pessimistic overtones and shows your cynicism towards your treatment as a whole.
I fail to see where you actually gave the guy any credit, it seemed more like a snarky little whip because you were given some homework on summer break, as if the guy isn't doing his job!

I'm not disagreeing with you at all.

I do see this as a good sign though. If he wasn't a good doctor he wouldn't be asking me to pay more attention to this. It's obviously a critical wound that is not going to heal until I notice and acknowledge it.

I agree with you. I agree with the doctor. As you said...this is an excellent example of how I take anything and reduce it down with my pessimism. These are the things I'm not aware of, but need to be. Even when I agree, I habitually put a negative spin to it.

This is kind of enlightening.

edit on 4-9-2014 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 10:06 PM
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I think you just needed to hear it in different words than your therapist was telling you. That's why some people prefer group therapy.

Lots of luck!



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 10:10 PM
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originally posted by: Iamthatbish
I think you just needed to hear it in different words than your therapist was telling you. That's why some people prefer group therapy.

Lots of luck!


I agree. I got more out of everybody's comments than I have in the last 3 months with this particular Dr. I was able to synthesize quite a bit of information here.

He was trying to get me into a group thing, but that didn't work out yet..He's still trying to track down the right group for me.

Thanks again for your comments, and thanks to everyone else too.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

I second the EFT recommendation. My wife escaped a several year post partum depression after I basically blackmailed her with the threat of divorce, that if she did not do one hundred rounds of tapping. I had tried everything I knew about, but being a family member often interferes with such things. I had known about EFT for several years, but had discounted it mostly, because I know NLP, and it seemed superfluous to me. I also could not understand the mechanism, so I further discounted it. But, she had been to a shrink and found no relief. And was on a daily crying jag schedule as well.

So, I got an EFT Course and learned it, and tried it on myself for something fairly minor. And I was very surprised that it worked, much beyond my expectations. As I said, I had to blackmail her to do it. So, no belief is required. It's not hypnotism or placebo, IMO. So, she went off by herself and did (by her report) about sixty rounds of tapping the first day. That's took about an hour and a half. The second day, she went off by herself, and did some more. After about half an hour, she came out and threw the disk set at me, and said something to the effect of, " I'm not doing this anymore. Divorce me if you want to. I don't even know why you are making me do it. I wasn't even depressed in the first place."

No more crying jags. No more anger toward me or her job. And she was happier on a day to day basis than I had seen her since our kid was born. I never addressed it again with her, because if she did not consciously remember she had been depressed, who was I to harp on it? I have no idea if she even has any conscious memory of her behaviors and state during that period. But, her getting happy again, made it a fair trade for me.

I'm pretty sure there are still free resources on-line for it. It's easy to do. And it works, IME. But, as your Doctor said, no one else can do it for you. When your conscious mind decides it's worth a couple of hours honestly trying it out....suspending and belief or disbelief...and just doing it anyway, then you can decide for yourself. Until then....maybe your Other Than Conscious mind has good reasons for not letting you in on your own life to a greater extent.

Be well.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 07:44 PM
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a reply to: Enderdog

Thanks for your testimony. I have never heard of this technique (though it was suggested by another poster earlier.) I have started looking into it. Thanks for the suggestion, and I'm glad it helped your wife and repaired your relationship



posted on Sep, 7 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

I know you were not seeking it. I was just saying I am not a doctor or psychologist.





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