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Contractors, how do you generate leads?

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posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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So I'm a flooring installer of all kinds. I literally walk onto commercial sites and find out who the gc is and see if we can bid on jobs.

I have been to every flooring store within an hour with a portfolio and business cards and I do get jobs here and there from the stores because we sand and finish hardwood and. No one else does.

Outside of that what's so e tricks for generating more leads for jobs?




posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 07:52 PM
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There is no trick. Tricks are for scam artists.
Do good work at a fair price and you will get a reputation. Bad reps are hard to lose so dont screw people.
Also try to get in with large contractors, they tend to overbook themselves and need sub contractors to keep their schedules.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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I feel your pain. Dont know where you live but there should be a list of general contractors who use subs. Mine is in our city planning office. I sent out letters asking to be included in their bidding process, some replied and allowed me to bid while others did not. I found that great work & work ethic and word of mouth can bring in the business. One thing I did was singage, plenty of signage.

There's a sign in every yard of every home Ive worked in..from N.C. to Texas. I actually give the home owner a discount for allowing the sign. It amazes me how much this helps out. I would say at least a 1/3 of my business comes from my signs and word of mouth. The other two thirds come from many a many night up late doing take offs and pricing then submitting my bid or proposal and keeping the fingers crossed.

Building good relationships with GC's can be a time consuming hectic thing. Remember they always want the lowest of the low price.Good luck in your ventures and hope all that you seek is rewarded to you. Use that sanding thingas your stand out service, you may be surprised at how well you do. Plus stay within the areas that can afford your services. Much luck, OYM1262



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: openyourmind1262

I went to the chamber of commerce trying to get my hands on that list. They don't do that in this town anymore.

So far I just google different words that relate to construction industries trying to find general contractors but it's not working.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Word of mouth, ensure who ever you do work for knows you and how to get ahold of you. When they show off their new floor they will usually ask who did it.
One person for me that I have done work for, turned into a half a dozen clients for me.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 08:26 PM
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Volunteer lot's of organizations and remember names, make friends.

Church, sports, environmental, animals, habitat or find your own that can even get you press.

Look around, lots need work or fixing. Tax benefit if you know how.







a reply to: onequestion



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 08:27 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

1st: under promise and over deliver. Word of mouth grows exponentially. Slow at first but picks up once you start to build a name.

2nd: specialize. For instance: hit every apt complex around. If they are large, take a dozen donuts. Keep at it.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 09:36 PM
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I don't know, word of mouth got me all my jobs. I also contracted with a government agency doing insulating.

Being honest and reasonably priced and doing a good job is what gets you the work. I got lots of work through the local lumber yard also, they knew I didn't cut corners. I always bought all materials for the job through that lumber yard if they gave me a referal. I had the same agreement with all the lumber yards.

I never advertised, but some people did, but I was more competitively priced then them so they knew not to even bid if I was bidding against them. I kept my overhead as low as possible.

Being insured is a necessity in contracting. A simple liability policy is needed if you do not have employees. Also either a builders or renovators license should be gotten, that protects the homeowner from you suing them if you get hurt. I could not sue a homeowner if I got hurt, I was on my own. My workers were covered by workers comp, they also could not sue the homeowner. Most people know of this release of liability with a license and comp. So being licensed is recommended. It gets you more jobs overall. I do not know about the rules in your state though.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: bbracken677

Good idea



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 10:37 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Introduce yourself at architectural and inferior desicrators. . . I'm sorry, interior decorators offices.
Leave some samples, small talk, basic idea of pricing psf. it goes a long way.
Can't tell you how many contracts I've given out for renovational work. Kitchen design centers and appliance wholesalers usually get the inside track on large commercial jobs also. Usually easy repetative cookie cutter type stuff too.

Good luck!



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 10:48 PM
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Op your getting some great advice it seems from those who have walked your path. The one thing I was told when I started my own business was " stay within the areas that can afford what it is you do" This is a real no-brainer. When these guys tell you word of mouth, as I did in first post, they know of what they speak. Not to get long winded, but I did commercial, industrial, electrical installtions & maintenance for 30 years.....and just quit to do my own thing....and it aint electrical. I incorparate electrical in my business, but I'm not in the electrical field any longer. I now do renovations and repairs & installs. I know this will sound utterly stupid to some who read it, but I quit an $ 27 an hour job as a superintendant for one of the largest electrical contractors in my state. Just was'nt happy, and job burn-out was a full blown three alarmer. I now after several years am back to that $27 dollar figure..most of the time. When I first started, I thought of calling my business " Chicken & Feathers Renovations" because some weeks we ate chicken, and another we ate the feathers. Keep up the good fight and all the luck you can take. Good luck my friend. What state are you in ? I have worked in almost every state east of the mississippi. I know a few GC, in a few areas I may be able to throw you a lead or two.Peace OYM1262 to add this...realtors, and home inspectors make them your friends.
edit on 2-9-2014 by openyourmind1262 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: openyourmind1262

Pa.

And thanks for the great advice.

To everyone.
edit on 9/2/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 03:26 AM
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I have worked for a lot of contractors over the years. One thing I have seen come through the office was something called "Dodge Reports"

Basically info on projects open for bids.

We did sheet metal/HVaC but I'd imagine all parts of the project were included.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 04:22 AM
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You can use different websites like

www.homeadvisor.com...

Create your own ads on

www.craigslist.org...

On slow work days or weekends go to your local home improvement store (Home Depot, Lowe's, ACE ....etc) and offer your services to people shopping for flooring materials.



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