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X37-B: 631 days in orbit and counting... Wow!

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posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 03:56 PM
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Don't you think if you have a satellite in a predictable orbit you'd keep an eye on it and notice an orbiter pulling up next to it?

This is why I don't think it's going around messing with foreign satellites.




posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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I think they keep something in there that they want stored in space, but still accessible.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: howmuch4another

Plink a satellite, and "oh damn! I'm sorry, but it looks like your satellite just got hit by some space debris." They cast bring them down, so prove it wasn't.


somehow it reminds me of this quote:


<mgodzilla> I was a r&d micro electronics engineer tech. in my youth.
* mgodzilla designed this dc to dc power supply they put on a satellite
<Elephark> awesome
* mgodzilla sent the satellite into orbit and lost contact w/ it
<Elephark> at least it was powered
<mgodzilla> they said it was mostly likely due to a power issue.
<Elephark> ...oh
<mgodzilla> I was like - what are you lookin' at me for?!?



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 04:56 PM
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I think the four key words are autonomy, maneuverability, energy & communication.
As far as one can tell, most of its operations are highly automated, its doing its mission by its own. Of course there is a mission control on land operating the craft, but most of its operations require little active control. That leads to the second point, maneuverability. It can change orbit and do so several times within its flight-time. As for energy and propulsion, that is the big mystery. It can stay in orbit for months if not years, in fact I don't believe there is a limit to its mission time. And lastly, communication. Although I am not knowledgeable enough to give any further clues on that, it probably does play a significant part in the military's communication networks of the next generation.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 06:12 PM
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Well, since Zaph told us what it's doing and it can be pretty much tracked where ever it goes (see below video), it's not too secretive anymore is it?


Next, mystery please. Or at least to the next mystery X-37b payload.





posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 08:13 AM
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a weapon delivery system capable of dropping nuclear warhead anywhere without warning..

nice .. i wonder if the russian and chinese also making their own space based weapon delivery sytem..



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: buntalanlucu

It is NOT a weapon delivery system. Nor is it messing with anyone else's sats. It is a testing platform.

You need to test something in space that you don't want to spend the money to permanently put in obit? Put it in an X-37b.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: Restricted
I think they keep something in there that they want stored in space, but still accessible.


Deathstar. Weapon of last resort that is too volatile to keep on Earth. Antimatter perhaps. I like it.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 04:17 PM
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Mine the moon, there is a mineral there that is rare on earth and is shown to be our best bet for plasma power.a reply to: Riffrafter



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman
EXACTLY.

It's also much safer and cheaper to test things with an unmanned platform. Keeping people alive in space for over a year at a time is a huge logistical headache and a costs a fortune.

New materials and new technologies are being tested, heck things could even be being built with that little robo-shuttle if it has a robotic arm.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: buntalanlucu

It is NOT a weapon delivery system. Nor is it messing with anyone else's sats. It is a testing platform.

You need to test something in space that you don't want to spend the money to permanently put in obit? Put it in an X-37b.



It's been in orbit for nearly two years - that's not a test, IMO. I think this is both a test vehicle nad a rapid response vehicle, as in when the NRO/AF has a gap to fill in space, they can use this thing to do it. Although I suppose a test can turn into something else if it goes well enough...

In any case, the possibilities for this thing are endless. Suffice it to say, it enables the intelligence community to develop new technologies at MUCh lower risk. I'm sure some of you remember that NRO sat that we blew out of the sky in '08..that was such a waste of a cool piece of technology, X-37 can really reduce the risks of things like that happening.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: quatro

It is a test. Every flight has gone longer, extending the capabilities, and testing what it can do while it's up there. While it's up there, it's also developing new technologies at the same time.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 09:53 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Salyut 3 (Almaz 2) had a 23 mm autocannon on board. The same kind used in some Tu-22s. Never heard anything about a recoilless rifle platform.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid

And it damn near blew a hole in it when they tried firing it. Not the best idea anyone ever had.
edit on 9/3/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 10:07 PM
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It is most likely propulsion, not payload.

What else makes sense?



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 10:12 PM
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a reply to: XCrissCrossX

Payload is the biggest part of what it's doing up there. Staying up there for as long as possible gives them more time to develop the payload, and refine it.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Well, the X-37 was originally planned to be launched inside the Space Shuttle. It was later deemed uneconomic, plus the Shuttles were scheduled to be retired. So perhaps that original design may help anyone with their speculations.

It was also originally designed to resupply and repair friendly satellites. It could bring fuel, replace or repair components, etc...

The engine it uses is human rated. The same engine had been used on the NF-104 flights.

OTV-1 orbited at very similar in characteristics to military spy satellites.

OTV-2 was considered an extreme success in the technologies it was testing.

OTV-3 is also in a very circular orbit. One key point is that this craft has undergone refurbishing from it's landing incident at the end of OTV-1.

I think they really are just testing new things. Not weapons, but space flight technologies. Want something really far fetched?

The engine is human rated. There have been quite a few recent advances in suspended animation (they're actively doing it for severe trauma patients at a Pittsburgh, PA, hospital now. While it is still trails, it can be assumed the military is more advanced). The cargo bay is large enough to fit a person. Around 600 days is about how long out takes to get to Mars and back using the most economical orbits. Put all that together.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid

At the same time, they're developing new optics while it's up there. Some incredible things that are going to revolutionize optics as we know it. We may finally get to read license plates from orbit, or newspaper headlines.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

We can read license plates from orbit. Just turn the car on its end. ;-)

And a newspaper? What's that?



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 10:26 PM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid

Ok, fine, I keep forgetting that I'm in my dotage and you young whippersnappers don't remember the old days. They'll be able to read your iPad over your shoulder from orbit.




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