The world’s biggest mysteries scientists still can’t solve

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posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 10:46 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: daaskapital

A battery over 2,00 years old?

Now I wonder if incandescent lights and simple electric motors ("sorcery") wasn't already there 2,000 years ago. Otherwise why would they need the battery for?


There are theories the ancient egyptians had some ability to use electric lights based on the lack of torch marks in certain areas.




posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: Klassified

Electroplating might be one use outside of lights and motors...

Indeed, nice point.


a reply to: Aazadan

There are theories the ancient egyptians had some ability to use electric lights based on the lack of torch marks in certain areas.

Well, there you go. If this is true, then Edison and Swan only re-discovered these ancient technologies, they didn't "invent" them.


a reply to: parad0x122

What IS this sorcery!?

Third law of Arthur C. Clarke: any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

People used to think that magnetism was a from of sorcery, an example was Anton Mesmer.

edit on 3-9-2014 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
Well, there you go. If this is true, then Edison and Swan only re-discovered these ancient technologies, they didn't "invent" them.


Remember that it's only a theory. There have been no devices found (to our knowledge), only the fact that they had batteries and the fact that in many of their tombs the walls lack any sign of having been lit with torches. As a stretch there's a few hieroglyphics that suggest light sources but it could easily be something else.



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 11:25 AM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: daaskapital

A battery over 2,00 years old?

Now I wonder if incandescent lights and simple electric motors ("sorcery") wasn't already there 2,000 years ago. Otherwise why would they need the battery for?


Not sure which pyramid in Egypt but in the early 1900's some archaeologists entered one and found the lights still on. If my memory serves me well it was a chemical mixture that glowed as bright as a light bulb.



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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originally posted by: Jesuslives4u

originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: daaskapital

A battery over 2,00 years old?

Now I wonder if incandescent lights and simple electric motors ("sorcery") wasn't already there 2,000 years ago. Otherwise why would they need the battery for?


Not sure which pyramid in Egypt but in the early 1900's some archaeologists entered one and found the lights still on. If my memory serves me well it was a chemical mixture that glowed as bright as a light bulb.


Torture??

tell us where the camels are

*zaaap zzap zap zap*

TELL US WHERE THE CAMELS ARE



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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The Tepe looks like it was destroyed by something, only those structures that are tied to something still stand it appears.

Anyway, how can they be sure of the age of any of these things? If I recall, they use K-Ar method to date non-organic materials, but the half-life is so long, so how can they be sure that they're accurate when it's a few thousand years?
edit on 4-9-2014 by np6888 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: Shiloh7

The reason that they don't want to acknowledge that their current view of history is woefully inadequate is the same reason that they won't acknowledge that they fudged numbers for AGW etc... Acknowledgement of errors of that magnitude on science and history that they like to purport as being settled means a lack of confidence in all of their paradigmic conclusions.

Which SHOULD be the case. The arrogance of man astounds me. Look at history, the only historically accurate scientific fact is that the modern paradigms are always inaccurate...

Jaden
edit on 5-9-2014 by Masterjaden because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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a technologically inferior, unaffiliated group of seafaring warriors who raided the lands and are often credited with the collapse of these once-great civilisations. The problem is, historians still have little if any idea of where these warriors came from, or what became of them after their conquest finally ended in Egypt


Sounds like Satanists.
Savage.
Fierce.
Scantily clad.
Ruining great things for small rewards.
Yes.
I can see the similarities.
Satanists did it.





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