It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

I May Be a Fault-Finder, But I Find Fault With This Account Of the Daiichi Staff Evacuation

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 10:12 AM
link   
Link: Fukushima Watch: Plant Manager’s Testimony Stirs Debate.

The cited article says that deceased Fukushima Daiichi plant manager Masao Yoshida (died 2013) testified before a governmental commission investigating the "accidents."



According to the Asahi’s interpretation of events, 90% of senior employees violated Mr. Yoshida’s orders and left on the morning of March 15 for the Fukushima Daini plant, 10 kilometers to the south. At that point, the Fukushima Daiichi plant’s reactor buildings had suffered multiple explosions and radiation was rising.


This is at odds with recent reports that there was at least one meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi on the very first day of the disaster.

A meltdown is so critical to safety that you'd expect a mass, rushed exodus right at that point in time.

In any case, March 15 was four days after the earthquake and tsunami and, according to official account, one day after three meltdowns.

Who in his right mind would stick around one to four days after meltdown(s), not to mention major explosions?

Let's put things into the perspective of the evacuation zone for the nuclear power plant at Indian Point, NY. That evacuation zone covers a radius of 50 miles from Indian Point.

The 10 km evacuation of Daiichi workers to Daini was hardly over 6 miles away.

And here's a very big question: the prospect of the events at Daiichi posed the very real danger of a massive chain reaction that could have taken down ALL of Japan's nuclear power plants, so does it make sense that nuclear power plant workers, who should have known better, would have evacuated to yet another danger site?

A prior thread of mine, which was moved to the ATS Skunk Works forum, raised the question as to when, exactly, this evacuation of Daiichi plant workers actutally took place. I speculated that it occurred BEFORE the earthquake and tsunami. (See: This Guy Says Fukushima Almost Ignited the Atmosphere BEFORE the Quake and Tsunami.)

P.M.
edit on 1-9-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Corrected two misspellings and punctuation.




posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 10:31 AM
link   

originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
Link: Fukushima Watch: Plant Manager’s Testimony Stirs Debate.



A prior thread of mine, which was moved to the ATS Skunk Works forum, raised the question as to when, exactly, this evacuation of Daiichi plant workers actutally took place. I speculated that it occurred BEFORE the earthquake and tsunami. (See: This Guy Says Fukushima Almost Ignited the Atmosphere BEFORE the Quake and Tsunami.)

P.M.


Which is where this "speculation" should be moved to, as well.

The thread you posted began with a disclaimer that he was NOT claiming "Fukushima almost ignited" before the quake.

More on the same theme as : "is Fukushima making my tapwater hot?"

Rubbish.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 10:56 AM
link   
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

The staff announced after the tsunami that the plant was being evacuated when meltdowns were underway. They were ordered by the government to stay. It is documented in the Part 1 thread noted in my signature. It would take some digging to find, but it is there.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 01:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: DancedWithWolves
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

The staff announced after the tsunami that the plant was being evacuated when meltdowns were underway. They were ordered by the government to stay. It is documented in the Part 1 thread noted in my signature. It would take some digging to find, but it is there.


Part 1 of your thread is dated March 11, 2011... very, very early in the scheme of things.

As I remember things, a significant amount of time went by before the government issued any kind of admission that 90% of the staff evacuated. And, if there was an early government order NOT to evacuate, maybe, just maybe this is because a good number of people had ALREADY evacuated which supports a suspicion that the evacuation occurred BEFORE the earthquake and tsunami.

In any case, are you referring to any official reports of orders to stay put and/or to evacuate, because, if you are, then what are these reports worth? The Daiichi plant manager is dead, as are probably a good number of other former Daiichi plant workers. The rest are probably being suppressed by Japan's States' Secrets law. None of these individuals are in a position to challenge the government's line.

BTW, I'd still like to know why my cold tap water was unusually warm today, warmer than ever, actually. Is it because of radionuclides from Fukushima that have fallen upon the United States, or, maybe because of other radioactive contamination that was released into the environment from other sources?

P.M.
edit on 1-9-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Improved usage.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 07:15 PM
link   
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

I have not seen what you are suggesting, but here is one significant account from the manager who has since died from cancer.

Panicked Workers Fled Fukushima Plant in 2011 Despite Orders, Record Shows


TOKYO — At the most dire moment of the Fukushima nuclear crisis three years ago, hundreds of panicked employees abandoned the damaged plant despite being ordered to remain on hand for last-ditch efforts to regain control of its runaway reactors, according to a previously undisclosed record of the accident that was reported Tuesday by a major Japanese newspaper.

The newspaper, The Asahi Shimbun, said that the episode was described by Masao Yoshida, the manager of the Fukushima Daiichi plant at the time of the accident, in a series of interviews conducted by government investigators several months after the March 2011 disaster.

The newspaper said it had obtained a copy of a 400-page transcript of the interviews, which had been referred to in government accounts of the accident but had never been released in its entirety.

Such a transcript could represent the only testimony of the accident left by Mr. Yoshida, who died last year of cancer at the age of 58. Mr. Yoshida is widely viewed in Japan as one of the disaster’s few heroes for preventing the crisis from spinning out of control by defying an order to stop pouring seawater on the overheating reactors.



More details here.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 08:03 PM
link   
a reply to: DancedWithWolves

What makes you think that you can trust a governmental transcript?

I can tell you the story of a trial transcript that I ordered to appeal a court case.

That transcript was not just falsified, it was heavily falsified with additions, changes, and deletions. It was a total reworking of reality.

One of the most egregious things was the cover-up of the trial judge's fielding a question that was directed to a prosecution witness. You know that you are being railroaded when a judge does such a thing.

The transcript included a very lengthy, fictional response to that question with that response's being attributed to the prosecution witness.

Back in the day, my father had a similar experience with a trial transcript.

So much for transcripts, and the Fukushima Daichii plant manager is no longer around to recant the content of the transcript to which you refer.

P.M.




top topics
 
0

log in

join