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The fear of being seen as racist

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posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 02:52 AM
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Prof Alexis Jay's harrowing report revealed the abuse of more than 1,400 children - mainly by men of Pakistani heritage

The fear of being seen as racist

I know this issue has been around the boards in one form or an other
but after reading this my first thought was for the young teenagers working in my the local corner shop
I don't by any stretch of the imagination live in a heavily muslin populated area
I have seen and felt the uneasy atmosphere when I am in for only a minuet or two
Should I say to the young woman (a lot younger 18) that she can let me know
if there are things being said to her that would be seen as unappropriated or even being groomed
Or am i acting like a racist by even thinking in this way?
There is a polish gentleman that runs the local fish and chip shop
There are teenagers working there but I don't get the same feeling
of tension that happens in the corner shop.
I have never thought of saying anything until I read this
Am I being silly or should I now start to look out for more signs
and then what!
I don't think I would feel comfortable accusing anyone
of grooming without some bloody hard evidence.
Is this inaction adding to the problem?
I ask ATS members for you're humble opinion.




posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:09 AM
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a reply to: crostkev

I don't think it makes you racist but, before I can fully answer your question I have to ask a few of my own.

Do you just feel tension as a whole or mainly coming from this one girl? Does she seem sad, or give you any indication she is otherwise distressed? Do the two of you have any familiarity other than encounters at said shop?



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:16 AM
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a reply to: crostkev

I would not say anything and it's unreasonable to think that anything could be going on just because they are Muslims.

I don't think we can deny that we just don't mix ,this multiculturalist society isn't working,who feels comfortable walking through towns heavily populated by Muslims ? I don't have a problem with the people themselves but I just don't think we are compatible



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:25 AM
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Wow I didn't even know it was done by mainly by men of Pakistani heritage.
Rochdale had the same thing going on and in West Yorkshire some years back the BBC pulled a documentary about the same stuff going on in Bradford.

news.bbc.co.uk...

I live in West Yorkshire and I think I have seen it go on.
BUT I know many dudes from Pakistan or from Pakistan heritage and they are cool dudes so I will not tar them all with the same brush.
edit on 30-8-2014 by boymonkey74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:30 AM
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I think the approach is wrong, and especially so if you are a male. To ask a direct question of the young girl is to ask her to shake her head, because if she is being groomed or has already been abused, then she has also been warned against speaking out and maybe has been threatened. I think it's always better to provide her with some information like placing a few business cards of an association that deals with this type of situation or a few pamphlets on the counter that would allow her to know whom to call for help. You could just ask her if it's okay to place those there for the general public.

For one thing she will not divulge until she is ready to, and that could take years. I have known two girls who were subjected to incestuous rape and even though the school and Children's Aid investigated, nothing happened until she turned 18. He was given a jail sentence of eight years, even though he raped her for 16 years.

ETA: the second girl confided in her grandmother after two years and her mother's boyfriend was found guilty, though I don't know what his sentence was.




edit on 30-8-2014 by aboutface because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:30 AM
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a reply to: U4ea82
Thanks for taking the time to ask
mainly from the young girls and only them
I guess to give you a better picture the shop is staffed by a number of adult women who work behind the counter and then there are a revolving number of young teenagers, there job being stacking the shelf's
the only male's are the father who owns the shop and three of his sons, the father is hardly ever there but there can be a number of male's there (son's and relatives)
the best description I could give of the girls emotional state would be subservient, intimidated but I have never heard anything other than playfulness from the male's but I get the feeling they feel dominated when no one is shopping in the shop.
I don't know any of the girls to speak to other than a polite smile while waiting to be served
I hope that helps.



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: crostkev

This would be classed as a safe-guarding issue and would be best dealt with by seriously reflecting on your own thoughts. That would be to be double-sure in your own mind that your concerns are real and not inflamed by the media.

If you are still concerned, you can contact the local social services who will have a telephone number on the council website. That won't always be a reassuring process as, in my experience, they aren't exactly dynamic and, in one case, it was left to me to take it further. At least, you will have registered a concern and that might tie-in with others or an ongoing investigation. Another option would be to ring 0800 1111 who can advise further. They might advise contacting the police, but the details you have don't sound enough to me.

On no account should you 'make friends' with the young person and then engineer a conversation towards possible misdeeds.

Prejudice is a natural human reaction in these circumstances. You always have to be aware that prejudice is usually wrong. The Pakistani men who've been doing all this are a minority so chances are there's nothing going on.



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:35 AM
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a reply to: aboutface that's very helpful thank you
I'm sorry but all I can give you in return is a star.



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:40 AM
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a reply to: U4ea82

Do you just feel tension as a whole or mainly coming from this one girl? Does she seem sad, or give you any indication she is otherwise distressed? Do the two of you have any familiarity other than encounters at said shop?

WTF..?

Do you NOT understand that this epidemic can be quantified..?

Your post is another example of PC gone wrong.




posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:47 AM
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a reply to: Kandinskyagain thank you Kandinsky for the advice
I agree that I don't have any real grounds to take action
But I'm going to show my age here, I am actually father to five wonderful children four of them are girls with my oldest now being a mother to my grand daughter.
So I am aware of how teenagers can be and girls at this age are in my book in need of a feeling of safety and when it's not there it shows big time.
You're advice on this matter is very helpful and I shall be following it, thank you.
I'm still not sure if this is racist, but the evidence is really stacking up about the grooming of young girls it worries me greatly.



edit on 30-8-2014 by crostkev because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-8-2014 by crostkev because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:54 AM
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a reply to: crostkev

People may disagree with me but, if you really believe some type of abuse is going on, contact social services. Tell them what you've observed and if they feel like the situation warrants further investigation, they'll proceed. If not, they won't. But, I don't think personally saying anything would be in anyone's best interests.

From a moral standpoint I believe that it's our responsibility to speak out for those who cannot speak for themselves. Especially if we believe they are in a situation that is directly detrimental to them.



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: crostkev

In that case, call 0800 1111 first as the council are probably closed on Saturday. They'll give you the best advice on the next steps.

Gotta listen to your conscience



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 03:58 AM
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a reply to: BestinShow

IT has NOTHING to do with being PC. It has everything to do with me needing more detailed information before I can give my opinion. I don't know what the OP has witnessed. I don't know what his relationship is with the child. I can't give a well thought out answer without being able to weigh all aspects of the situation.

My apologies. Next time I'll just say "Oh Holy frak! A Muslim!!!!! Someone save the girl from the evil terrorists!"

edit on 30-8-2014 by U4ea82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 04:04 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky
Thank you again
I don't feel there is merit in taking that sort of action in this case, well not yet anyway
As a father I am very worried that this is such a big thing and there seams to be more and more cases coming to light.










wer much to young to deal with thesee problems but they keep thrusting them self's on us... untill finaly wer foced to think of the solution



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 04:07 AM
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a reply to: U4ea82

You're absolutely right. If people assumed that every Muslim or Pakistani Muslim was part of a grooming gang and reported them, the organisations like childline, police and social services would be spending all their time responding to non-events.



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 04:13 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky
Thank you. That was exactly my point. I understand that this type of thing is prevalent in Muslim communities. I was not disputing that fact. That being said, I can't make a judgment call that I myself am comfortable with without knowing the specifics of the situation. I refuse to make snap judgments based on the child's race alone. That's just not something I'll ever do. I was raised better than that.

I was starting to wonder how being thorough made me "overly PC".



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 04:13 AM
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I just noticed this, it seams to me the lines are blurred far more now than then


Ray Honeyford: Racist or right?
Ex-head teacher of school in Bradford where more than 90% of pupils were non-white
Sparked national controversy in 1984 with outspoken criticism of multiculturalism
Objected to the right of different cultures to remain separate within the same country and attacked political correctness
Suspended in 1985 but later won appeal and went back to work
Disgruntled parents and others organised large-scale protests outside school, while about half of pupils ceased to attend
Honeyford given police protection but agreed to retire early in December 1985 - he never worked as a teacher again



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 04:19 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

Don't give them ideas ...






posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 04:58 AM
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You're not a racist for being concerned about this girl. People are subconsciously(and consciously) so wired to fit in with the crowd and so fearful of being ostracized and looked down upon by the majority they allow themselves to be manipulated and controlled by the people controlling the narrative.Even when things make no sense at all we'll often ignore the facts for fear of rocking the boat and being labeled a troublemaker(or racist).We need to shake off this mind control bs-and that`s what it is, and get back to common sense.We're adults and are full well capable of identifying racist behaviour,and we can distinguish this from honest mistakes and people with thin skin crying wolf or in this case racism,at every perceived slight or instance someone doesn`t bow down to their every whim because of their religion. It`s a funny thing,the people who use the race card the most, use it because it`s a good con,it`ll get you out of a lot when used against the white man. As a race this same group that cries racism constantly is EASILY PROVABLE to be BY FAR the most racist people around, but the same people who brainwashed white society into fearing the racist label at the same time emboldened blacks by ignoring race as a factor in every violent act committed against whites.Why? Who #ing knows,some misplaced white guilt from some libtard douche sitting up high,never having been exposed to real people interactions? Perhaps.
Anyway My point is this, you know from the experience of others that if you run into a bear in the forest most of the time it`ll run away,it doesn`t want trouble any more than you do.You're also keenly aware of many past bear attacks,not because you're racist-but because they have happened often and are well documented,so you stay cautious and look for any sign of aggression.
People in various groups whether that be religious or ethnic often times share like characteristics, many acceptable in their society but deemed deplorable in ours.It is not racist to be aware of these things and keep an eye out for trouble, it`s common sense. Political correctness is killing our society and through social pressure we are acting like lemmings and willingly marching off the cliff.
SNAP OUT OF IT!!



posted on Aug, 30 2014 @ 05:16 AM
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The word racism is banded about so freely these days by the uneducated that it has almost diluted itself.

So by screaming racism at every little thing, people are in fact doing more harm than good when it comes to real racism.

When I here the words "that guys being racist" I no longer think, my gosh that's abhorrent, I'm thinking "Hmm is he really?"



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