Food storage for celiac sufferers

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posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 02:02 PM
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Tackling a food storage plan can be daunting at times, it can be even more so when there are medically necessary dietary restrictions to deal with. I personally like to go into each winter with enough to see us through to spring at minimum, just in case. It has paid off a hundredfold already. It has kept us from leaving the house in terrible weather, kept us fed during a winter of serious family trauma, and ensured that no matter who comes over we always have plenty to share. Those are only a few among the more obvious reasons to build a good food storage plan. This year I am starting from near scratch. I even had to give away all of my smoked salmon from last summer because I used a soy sauce based brine.

A typical food storage plan revolves around grains. Flour is a staple of our lives. It is indispensable and inexpensive. Wheat, barley and rye have fed the masses for a good portion of our history and they are everywhere in our lives. Unfortunately for some, simply touching a speck of any of those three substances to our lips can mean horrible consequences. When you find yourself in any kind of emergency situation, the last thing you need is a severely dehydrated debilitated family member to have to worry about.

The first main step to take after a diagnosis is to rid your cooking environment of the contaminant completely. Any cross contamination at all can result in a very bad week. This is also a daunting task. It takes time to build up a decent food storage, and the act of purging so much time and money from your home in one fell swoop is stressful. Luckily there are plenty of people who welcome free food.

Certain naturally gluten free foods are normal food storage items anyway, and obviously the least expensive route to take. Beans and rice are probably the top two that people have in their homes already, and you can do a hundred different things with them given the availability of other ingredients. Fresh foods such as fruits, vegetables and meats are all naturally gluten free, but aren't always available to us inexpensively. Be careful with canned and frozen goods, you always have to read the label closely. I have given away a lot of food simply because I was in a hurry and didn't read every single word on cans of beans and small bags of arborio rice. I have also made my self sick because I became comfortable with a single freezer case in the entire grocery store. Items get moved a foot from where they usually sit or placed back on the wrong shelf and I grab an item that I just know is gluten free, and it turns out that its not. Then of course there is the newfound inability to cook again. There are many hurdles in simply relearning the basic act of feeding ourselves and our families, relearning the art of food storage is one of them. I have listed some options that we have found below.

List of celiac safe storage items
Rice
Beans
Dehydrated potatoes
Egg, milk and butter powders ( read the label, but they should be safe)
Other dehydrated vegetables and fruits (I do this myself anyway so I know for a fact there are no cross contamination issues, beware of commercially dried products)
Canned and frozen fruits and vegetables (check labels closely, home canned is safe)
SPAM is safe ( if you can call it that lol)
Canned fish ( again always check, and be careful of others' home canned products, always check ingredients)
Coconut oil
Coconut flour
Gluten free bullion cubes
Straight Herbs and spices ( no packet mixes and white pepper is off limits because flour is often added)
Salt
Vinegars

This is not intended to be an all inclusive list, but a starting point. Below is a link to a website that has a super simple six ingredient biscuit recipe utilizing the coconut flour and oil. This is the recipe that prompted me to choose coconut flour as my storage flour, besides the fact that it has a long shelf life. The biscuits have an entirely different texture to them, but they aren't bad and super nutrient and even protein dense for a little biscuit. They also have a longer shelf life than most gluten free baked goods. I am able to make up a weeks worth if I choose, I don't have to bake daily.

Coconut biscuits

Here is a link to the Mormon food calculator, it has always helped me figure out how much of certain things I would like to have on hand. Keep in mind that it is very grain heavy, but know there are other options to replace those grains with.

Food storage calculator

Here's a wealth of food storage information. I'm not Mormon and don't agree with much from them, but they have perfected the art of long term food storage.

preparedldsfamily.blogspot.com...


It is also important to have plenty of vitamins around. Most celiacs have deficiency issues because of absorption problems. Some good quality supplements can make a difference between someone who is a normal healthy person and someone who doesn't have the energy or stamina to make it through a normal day. These are good for anybody finding themselves in a situation where less than desirable nutrition is all that's available anyway. I also stumbled across the fact that activated charcoal will absorb the toxin that is gluten to a celiac. I can avoid the 24 hour period of vomiting if I know I have been glutened and take some charcoal in time. There are still severe consequences from the gluten, and the charcoal doesn't help with the deficiency problems, so it's not a license to cheat. It's worth taking it on occasion to prevent being bed ridden for 24 hours though. It's also a good thing to have in a first aid kit anyway since it will help absorb ingested toxins.

Every food storage plan is started for individual reasons and needs to be personalized to fit our family's needs. There are many other medically necessary diets out there and things can be personalized and changed just enough to accommodate everyone safely. Keeping healthy in any situation is always the best for anyone involved. Hopefully this has been of some help to someone. Thanks for reading, and don't hesitate to ask any questions. I'm new to this myself, but I'm willing to use my experiences to help anyone else going through it. I'm my own guinea pig. Please don't take any of this as medical advice, simply personal experience, always talk to your doc!

edit on 26-8-2014 by woodsmom because: Fixed a redundancy
edit on 26-8-2014 by woodsmom because: Typo




posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 02:39 PM
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NOT an Advertisement...just too lazy to remove pricing from my site but to show my commitment to your info:

I won't post my site.

Breads...Double Loaves 10.95-12.95
(white, maritime brown, multi-seed, sweet potato)
Pizza crust 5.95
Burger bun 1.95
Cinnamon buns 2.95
Dessert loaves 9.95 (lemon, banana, mix berry)
Cookies 6 per bg 5.95 (Ch chip, PB, PB and Ch chip, coconut, almond cranberry) date sandwich (3 per bg)
Pies (meringues, meats or fruits) L: 12.95 Sm: 5.95
Cake...9"round 25.00 or 9x13 49.00
(vanilla, choc, carrot with cr cheez icing, sweet potato mousse)
Squares: 9x13 pan 45.00 (Energy bars, Nanaimo bars, Reeses PB, toffee, cherry, butterscotch ripple, Sweet Marie, pecan butter tart, brownies, lemon crunch, mango and peach, cheese cake
Soups...16 oz 6.95 Beans, haddock chowder, chili
Fish/Chicken Dry Batter Mix $9.95 (500g) CRISPY…NOT GREASY!


These are some items that we make for the celiac folks so I get it. Your info is valuable so very much appreciated.

I have thought about this for awhile and have come to realize that celiac storage in a SHTF situation will be relatively easy since most will already be sealed.

I also have a thread on SHTF baking for non-celiac if people are interested.: www.abovetopsecret.com...

There are also celiac baking tips in SHTF times.

Nice thread.

Peace


edit on 26-8-2014 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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I get canned alaskan wild caught salmon when it goes on sale. I rotate them, they have a long shelf life though. The cats love canned salmon, half the can goes to them. I make sandwiches out of the rest. For three bucks a can, it is way better than spam.

Can people with celiac eat miracle whip or does it have any ingredients that are a problem?



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:04 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I get canned alaskan wild caught salmon when it goes on sale. I rotate them, they have a long shelf life though. The cats love canned salmon, half the can goes to them. I make sandwiches out of the rest. For three bucks a can, it is way better than spam.

Can people with celiac eat miracle whip or does it have any ingredients that are a problem?


On any item look for wheat or gluten. Not always ok... ex: oats ... but it is a start. Oats may be gluten free but it can be contaminated by cross fields, storage or processing facilities. Often in wheat areas.

Peace



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: jude11

Thank you! I was really bummed when I had to pass your bread recipe out of my house, but I did give all of my recipes to a friend. I have always appreciated your take on food storage. One of my first reactions when I came out of shock was the frustration at starting this over. I would actually appreciate a link to your website if you would like to U2U it to me. The summer time was especially tough in general because we are so active and not home to cook all the time, and both of my young sons have given up on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches because of the gluten free bread.



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Excellent information.

I have autoimmune. Sjogrens. And a lot of the foods that set off celiacs are things I shouldn't have either. They make the sjogrens symptoms worse. It's not just celiacs who should be careful, it's also autoimmune in general. (I'm not a doctor ... that's my opinion based on experience).

We have buckets of long term storage rice and beans. I've also got the canned goods that I rotate. I have to avoid sugar and bready things so that cuts down on what I can eat. I have a very limited diet.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I smoke and can all my own salmon, it's such a nice easy meal addition or snack. I brine it almost teriyaki style before I smoke it and it has a slightly sweet and spicy flavor. The dogs always get the scraps, and they love it. I still save them and take them to my friends place where my old beast now lives.

And yes, miracle whip is safe, so mayo and many salad dressings. Read carefully if you need to be exact.
I'm glad jude11 brought up the oats too, they are only safe if labeled gluten free. All of our grains are carried by the same transportation system.



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

The diet supposedly helps with the autism spectrum as well. My nephew benefitted from this diet.

I couldn't even imagine having to cut out more than gluten, but I know a lot of people do. The diet limitations are a pain in the rear, but still worth it to feel better. This list could even be adapted to dairy free or even vegan if necessary.



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom

I still have to get about ten fish from the Indian commercial fisherman to freeze for winter. I should go down there this week. My wife likes whitefish best. I like fish. I was so mesmerized seeing the big salmon in the rivers in Juneau back in 75. My uncle lived there and he didn't like fish. That place was heaven to me. The game warden bitched at my stepbrother and I for trying to kick a salmon out of a river. Kids.

I'm sure glad I don't have celiacs disease. I do have some problems with wheat products I am trying to figure out though.

edit on 26-8-2014 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:18 PM
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There are flours which are naturally gluten free like buckwheat, corn and millet. Pure oats also work too for majority of celiac patients.
A mixture of corn flour and rice flour makes bakings actually taste a lot like wheat. If you want to make bread, add psyllium or xanthan to the dough and it makes dough easy to handle and works like gluten would in breads, you can make cinnamon rolls etc. Which actually tasted pretty much same.
There is no need to make celiac diet hard ( its pricey tho )
You can dehydrate glutein free bread and make breadcrumbs, which you can use in cooking too, fish and meat..



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:25 PM
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originally posted by: dollukka
There are flours which are naturally gluten free like buckwheat, corn and millet. Pure oats also work too for majority of celiac patients.
A mixture of corn flour and rice flour makes bakings actually taste a lot like wheat. If you want to make bread, add psyllium or xanthan to the dough and it makes dough easy to handle and works like gluten would in breads, you can make cinnamon rolls etc. Which actually tasted pretty much same.
There is no need to make celiac diet hard ( its pricey tho )
You can dehydrate glutein free bread and make breadcrumbs, which you can use in cooking too, fish and meat..



Just a little:

Guar gum works the same at 1/3 the price.

Tapioca flour is also a great way to add to your base for taste, texture and binding. If using psyllium, make sure it's without husks because of waste in weight.

Peace



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Whitefish is great, halibut or rockfish for us. I finally came up with a beer batter for our halibut again. The gluten free beers really aren't worth drinking, but makes the batter as close to authentic as I have found.
I cheated and used king arther GF pancake mix and it was great. The real deal is the last gluten meal I had.

Dolluka, the recipes you have me have been awesome, and just the tip about the psyllium has helped me bake a bit more often again. I react poorly to the gums, so they have been a lifesaver. I just liked the coconut biscuits for the few ingredients they require.

Jude11, I will try the tapioca, thanks for that tip. Almond flour has become another favorite of mine. 2 parts almond flour to 1 part flax meal with some sugar and butter make an awesome cheesecake crust.



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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originally posted by: woodsmom
a reply to: rickymouse

Whitefish is great, halibut or rockfish for us. I finally came up with a beer batter for our halibut again. The gluten free beers really aren't worth drinking, but makes the batter as close to authentic as I have found.
I cheated and used king arther GF pancake mix and it was great. The real deal is the last gluten meal I had.

Dolluka, the recipes you have me have been awesome, and just the tip about the psyllium has helped me bake a bit more often again. I react poorly to the gums, so they have been a lifesaver. I just liked the coconut biscuits for the few ingredients they require.

Jude11, I will try the tapioca, thanks for that tip. Almond flour has become another favorite of mine. 2 parts almond flour to 1 part flax meal with some sugar and butter make an awesome cheesecake crust.


yup,

Substitute the almond for the tapioca. Works the same, 75% less cost.

If you like the almond essence, use extract or oil.

Peace



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 04:31 PM
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I had forgotten about the sorghum flour that I found. I came across 50 lb bags of that as well as the coconut flour I mentioned. I haven't been baking much over the summer and it slipped my mind. The sorghum is nice because it seems more similar to the wheat flavor we are so used to, at least to my palate.

And thanks jude!! I will have to try that, the almond flour is only continuing to get more expensive thanks to the drought.
edit on 26-8-2014 by woodsmom because: Thanks jude11



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 05:21 PM
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As a vegan I cook with either fresh or dried ingredients. The only cans in my cabinet are a few just in case cans I learned I needed when all my pipes froze last winter. All my food required water!

I screen shoted that coconut biscuit recipe. I can make it with egg replacer. Coconut everything is my favorite! Ty for posting. While I'm trying to stock up, my boys must be growing because if its in the house they eat it.



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom

Boy, cooking gluten free is a major change to the diet. It's hard to even fathom how much of a change.

I know someone who has a kid with celiac and the change in diet was hard on the kid. The kid was having all sorts of intolerance's to the new foods, for different reasons than the celiac. Seems that some of the replacements, foods that he don't have the proper enzymes to process because of his genes, were causing him different kinds of problems. They have found many foods that the kid can't eat, and these foods do not taste good to the parents either. The parents were not tolerating these food changes well, meaning that they probably had a metabolic issue with them also.

Funny how we evolved with foods like that. After a couple of years they finally got things figured out and the kid is doing pretty well. Good thing they had good insurance and the maximum life time limit was taken off by Obama. I don't think that the kid is going to have nearly as much problems in the future now, hopefully anyway.



posted on Aug, 27 2014 @ 06:27 AM
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I have been exposed to gluten free for about 10 years now because of various family members and friends and I am the primary cook in my family. There are people with wheat intolerance and people who are true coeliacs, your case is unusual. Usually true silly yaks cannot handle even the smallest trace of gluten, which how your situation sounds. But they also cant handle oats or rye. Some coeliacs who aren't as sensitive can handle rye flour because the gluten protein in it is slightly different but I have never heard of gluten free oats. Whatever your situation, here are some tips I found.

Glutinous rice flour has no gluten in it, it is the type of starch that makes this rice sticky, it isnt a complete substitute but worth using instead of normal rice flour. Most gluten free flours have soy bean flour or chick pea flour (besan) in them which gives it a strange taste. Guar gum and Xanthan gum can be used to help the binding quality of the flour but they have a peculiar taste, one is worse than the other, experiment and see what you prefer. Some other flours you may not have thought of: chestnut flour non-bitter (expensive but yummy), millet, quinoa, buckwheat, urid flour (from Indian stores) has a taste like soy bean and besan but a bit different, potato. Mung bean flour has no flavour but is like potato flour, it goes translucent when wet and you cant use too much of it in a mix. There are "glass noodles" you can buy that are made from mung bean flour.

I found that mixing at least 3-4 flours with rice and/or corn as the main ones and 5% mung or potato used to give me a flour that was pretty neutral in taste. So I would use say 50-60% glutinous rice and/or corn, 10-20% millet, 10-120% buckwheat (goes well with cocoa), 10% chestnut, 10% urid/soy/besan and 5% mung or potato and half the recommended rate of gum. The more rice flour you have the more moisture it takes up. You can have a mix looking about right consistency but if you have used a lot of rice flour in it, you look at it again in 3 minutes and it is too dry.

It will never be the same and you cant make real bread anymore, any bread you make will be more like a cake than bread, but you can get used to it. I find that some biscuits my mother in law makes for my father in law are better than the ones made with wheat flour.

If you can use oats then there is enough gluten in them to make up for what is lost from wheat.

Dont bother with barley, it is just a poor cousin of wheat with 1/3 the gluten.

Spelt, Einkorn, Kumut are wild wheat ancestors and can either have a lot of gluten or a little, they are very variable and can depend on the growing conditions.

Some crispbreads are gluten free and have long storage.



posted on Aug, 27 2014 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Luckily, we are getting it figured out. I'm very lucky to have the support of my husband and boys. We are also pretty lucky in the fact that we were already trying to produce as much of our own food as possible, and eat as fresh as possible. So much damage was done in the 34 years it took to figure it out, that it has taken awhile just to heal initially. 8 months in, and I have quite a bit of healing to to although I have made leaps and bounds of progress. Maybe that was the case with the little guy? My doc did tell me it would take a couple of years at least to get back to normal, but since it has never been normal I'm already feeling the healthiest of my life some days. Other days not so much, and I have still managed to get myself sick at least once a month through the summer. Once the system heals though and the poison is gone, we are just like anyone. I have always been active, now I feel supercharged some days and its amazing. We have done more removing from the diet than adding to it, so maybe that's why we don't react too bad. Except for the gums, and I'm not too worried about not eating them.

I'm glad to hear he's doing better, poor kid. I'm glad it's me and not one of my sons. At least they can still go to a birthday party and have cake. Thank goodness the insurance is good. We have pretty good insurance too, and in the state of Alaska an insurance company has to pay a naturopath the same as they would an MD. It has helped, but since I am going the natural route a lot of the cost is out of pocket. Goodness though, my naturopath is the gentleman who finally figured it out, and within minutes of being there he already had me feeling better. Most of the cost also lies in the diet, and trying to build back up my pantry and emergency food storage. It's now harvest season and I have been able to put up six cases so far of home canned goodies, my salmon, pickles, mustards, jams, etc, etc. my veggies should be ripening in the next couple of weeks too. That helps a lot, and one side bonus of the more expensive food is that the few processed foods that we do get are typically part of the Non-GMO project and certified organic, so they are at least healthier versions than we would purchase before due to cost. I still need a few easy things.

Wow, sorry for the ramble haha! I'm still working on my first cup of coffee.



posted on Aug, 27 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad

I love the silly yaks! That's cute.

Yes, I have full blown, blood test confirmed celiacs. With allergies to wheat, green beans, dogs, cats, horses, alfalfa, alder and birch among many other more minor players. I was essentially told the week before Christmas 2013 that I was allergic to my life. My firewood had to be removed from the house and every stick replaced with spruce, and we had three years worth of firewood in various states of cure. Since we live in a birch forest, that what we had. We were blessed with a new friend who has traded us for every piece of wood we had though. My puppy dog now lives with and belongs to some good friends of ours. We go see him often. It's been very emotional, and frustrating as well as a wonderful blessing in our lives. Celiac messes with a person so bad that its not just a sour tummy. It messes with your head and emotions, it saps your energy and destroys your digestive and immune systems. Removing every allergen though really has given me new life.

On behalf of your family and friends, thank you for your patience and willingness to help them eat! I typically don't eat if I don't cook it myself in my own kitchen. My own mom tried to bring beer brats and buns over this summer and was offended when I told her how sick that would make me. Well, they ate my food but brought their own buns anyway and I still ended up contaminated.

We just don't realize how pervasive something is in our lives until we have to rid ourselves of it completely. I can't have any, not a single gluten molecule. It acts as an on-off mechanism, and either its on and causing damage or its off and I'm perfectly fine.

The deal with the oats is that they are cross contaminated unless they have been harvested, transported and stored in a dedicated gluten free facility. As a Midwestern girl originally, it was easy to understand, as everything is taken on the same trucks, dumped in the same silos and hauled in the same train cars or semi trucks. I have stood inside the grain silos and watched them work. It's dusty and dirty honestly. There is no possible way to have clean oats that way. I have found two sources of safe oats and eaten them both safely, glutenfreeda and Bob's Red Mill. Bob's went as far as to just start doing it all themselves from seed to store so there is never a chance that a single oat will touch any wheat. Barley and rye are both also off limits to me completely.

Thanks for the ratio ideas for flour blends. I'm not a huge fan of the rice flours, but they have their place. You are so right about the bean flours. I made some gluten free Christmas cookies and they had bean flour, they were gross. Cookies should not taste like beans. I do like the bean noodles though and they store well. I will look into the quickbreads. This will give me more room to play around. Thanks for your insight and advice! I'd also be interested in that biscuit recipe if you want to share.


One quick question though, do you know which of the flours have the longest shelf life by chance? I should have asked jude11 too. I know that brown rice will tend to go rancid and so will almond flour due the the high fat content. On the other hand the coconut flour (which works like the rice flour to absorb moisture) has almost as long of a shelf life as coconut oil. I like amaranth and millet, but they are high protein, does that translate to higher fat content too? Sorry, I'm still figuring it out.



posted on Aug, 27 2014 @ 11:29 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

My kid was like that, he was diagnosed with celiac at age of 4, he is a type 1 diabetic since age 3 and on yearly lab tests there was celiac antibodies sky high which lead to biopsy. He has been gluten free diet now 6 years, in the last year we have been able to bring fish back to the diet little by little, he couldn´t consume fish (he likes fish, but after 30 minutes he threw up) and spices also citrus fruits gave him blisters in the mouth.
When hubby got a celiac diagnosis, he had lost 44lb within 3 months, he looked very sick and skinny. To him it was really fast as usually celiac takes many months or years to show any symptoms. Well i had my suspicions due the sounds he made with almost each steps ( you know what i mean )





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