The Stairway to Sirius.

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posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: KilgoreTrout

The only immediate answer I can propose is that the sun, in reference to Masonry, is always considered overhead and this parallels the All Seeing Eye of God which the Blazing Star now represents, i.e. omnipresence.




posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 04:32 PM
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originally posted by: Saurus

originally posted by: KilgoreTrout

It appears as though there is some division between UGLE and US as to the identity of the Blazing Star.


Indeed... I even get the question "Are we sun-worshippers?" every now and then after delivering the first Degree lecture to Entered Apprentices.

In fact, going back in the history of English Masonry, the Blazing Star was once a representation of the Divine Shekinah which appeared over the Ark of the Jewish Covenant, but in making Masonry amenable to men of all religions, it was written into the lectures as representing the sun.

One should also take note, however, that in 18th century English Lodges, the letter G was always found on the floor of a Lodge within a Blazing Star.



Whatever else Freemasonry is or isn't, it is influenced by the Judeo-Christian tradition and as such has the same remnants of functional ritual. Judaism and Christianity in turn are derived from the Mesopotamian and then Egyptian, then Greek traditions which leaves us with a huge syncretic mess to untangle. In terms of metaphorical usage though, which applies to all the above arriving at that point eventually in their history, it doesn't matter so much, it is merely a medium on which to apply the message. The Mesopotamians, in particular, did the same thing, constructed their cultural narratives and stories according to the relevancy of the celestial movements at any given times. They were not to be taken literally, however, there was a greater relevancy to the performance of the plays and mysteries. The festival that celebrated Sirius was particularly significant and it is likely that the culmination was the magical reappearance of Sirius after two months (or so) of invisibility. I have little doubt that the initiates and participants believed to at least to some extent that the return of the star was dependent upon the proper observance of the 12 days of ritual.

But yeah, either way, you're Sun worshippers.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 04:51 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: KilgoreTrout

The only immediate answer I can propose is that the sun, in reference to Masonry, is always considered overhead and this parallels the All Seeing Eye of God which the Blazing Star now represents, i.e. omnipresence.


I can see how the metaphor can be reapplied, but in what way is the Sun always overhead? I don't know, I think there was a lot of on the feet thinking going on when they decided that and they didn't think it through properly.

That said, what is particularly prudent about Sirius? However, esoterically, the three magi, as the belt of Orion, do point to Sirius and Sirius does proceed the Sun rise. The Mesopotamians used it as an illustration of the Ishtar/Tammuz mystery and that whole birth/rebirth cycle that aided in the planning of the agricultural year. All the beliefs derived from that Once and Future King mythos have been stripped of the practical applications and left only with the ritual...which is all you need, as long as it is understood that it is all, really, metaphors teaching us how to be better people. Unfortunately, a little too much of the taking such things literally and you have everyone sat on their hands waiting for their saviour while Rome burns around them.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: KilgoreTrout
I can see how the metaphor can be reapplied, but in what way is the Sun always overhead?


Since Masonry is worldwide the metaphor is similar to that of the British Empire.


That said, what is particularly prudent about Sirius?


Nothing I can think of, neither is it omnipresent.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:12 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: KilgoreTrout
I can see how the metaphor can be reapplied, but in what way is the Sun always overhead?


Since Masonry is worldwide the metaphor is similar to that of the British Empire.


Now, have you read any Rudyard Kipling?


Freemasonry long proceeds it's colonial diaspora both by English and their mainland brethren...could be justification for the change of metaphorical emphasis. It doesn't ultimately matter on that level anyway, it is only of concern to those initiates who want to dig deeper and understand the underlying meaning of the metaphor. They might hit a brick wall, but the majority of Freemasons, I hear, are in it for the wining and dining, so that shouldn't be a problem too often



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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originally posted by: KilgoreTrout

I can see how the metaphor can be reapplied, but in what way is the Sun always overhead?


OMG - I just realized you're not a Mason!
For some reason, I always had it in my mind that you were....




posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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originally posted by: KilgoreTrout
Now, have you read any Rudyard Kipling?


I have indeed and he is one of my favorite authors who happens to be a Mason.

Freemasonry long proceeds it's colonial diaspora both by English and their mainland brethren...could be justification for the change of metaphorical emphasis. It doesn't ultimately matter on that level anyway, it is only of concern to those initiates who want to dig deeper and understand the underlying meaning of the metaphor. They might hit a brick wall, but the majority of Freemasons, I hear, are in it for the wining and dining, so that shouldn't be a problem too often


I sent you a U2U on the metaphor for better clarification.

As for the 'wining and dining' aspect I think this is beginning to change (thankfully) as more and more members (at least in my area) join looking for a deeper meaning and not just for the 'hang out' factor.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:16 PM
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originally posted by: Saurus
OMG - I just realized you're not a Mason!
For some reason, I always had it in my mind that you were....


I think Kilgore, if I remember correctly, would not be able to join our boys club.

The funny thing is she knows more than 99% of most Masons I associate with.


edit on 3-9-2014 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer, and I am not speaking metaphorically



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:24 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Saurus
OMG - I just realized you're not a Mason!
For some reason, I always had it in my mind that you were....


I think Kilgore, if I remember correctly, would not be able to join our boys club.

The funny thing is she knows more than 99% of most Masons I associate with.




I'm a contrary old bitch any way, so even if you all changed the rules just for me or I grew men bits, I still wouldn't join.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:51 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: KilgoreTrout
Now, have you read any Rudyard Kipling?


I have indeed and he is one of my favorite authors who happens to be a Mason.


The Cat that Walked by Himself is one of my all time favourites of his. I have a print of his illustration of said cat on my wall. The reason I mention it though, is your reference to the colonial relationship combined with the article I linked before and the Man Who Would be King. The article states that one of the primary reasons that Freemasonry proved so successful in India was due to a shared affiliation with Sirius which they identified with Sudarshana Chakra, and if you compare the mythology there are a number of correlations with the Mesopotamian stories which were later imported into Egypt. Sudarshana translates as 'vision which is auspicious' and chakra provides the active, it is therefore a good path to follow.



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:52 PM
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originally posted by: KilgoreTrout
I'm a contrary old bitch any way, so even if you all changed the rules just for me or I grew men bits, I still wouldn't join.


Hah.

Probably more fun than networkdude anyway...



posted on Sep, 3 2014 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: KilgoreTrout
The Cat that Walked by Himself is one of my all time favourites of his. I have a print of his illustration of said cat on my wall. The reason I mention it though, is your reference to the colonial relationship combined with the article I linked before and the Man Who Would be King. The article states that one of the primary reasons that Freemasonry proved so successful in India was due to a shared affiliation with Sirius which they identified with Sudarshana Chakra, and if you compare the mythology there are a number of correlations with the Mesopotamian stories which were later imported into Egypt. Sudarshana translates as 'vision which is auspicious' and chakra provides the active, it is therefore a good path to follow.


I also like that one as well.

That is a distinct possibility which makes sense. That article reminds me of how the Romans so easily coopted other peoples by incorporating their Roman beliefs and ritual into their newly conquered subjects creating a admixture of both which more easily homogenized the pacified people.



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 04:04 PM
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originally posted by: KilgoreTrout
a reply to: Kantzveldt





I had a total 'Doh!' moment while cleaning the candlesticks (sadly not a euphemism) while at work today. In that bottom sketch Ungnand is transposing the Genesis narrative onto the Mesopotamian world view isn't he? That would explain why he decided it was 'paradise'. Talk about confusing matters!

Anyway, remove that distraction, and your OP starts to make much better sense, with 'The Field' being the apex of the Mesopotamian axis mundi in it's settled form.

Much less 'heaven is a place on earth' and much more 'there's no place like home'.



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 05:54 PM
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Just reading this which nicely covers all bases in terms of the Blazing Star...


Egyptian Idolatry: This idolatry was early learned by the Israelites from their Egyptian taskmasters; and so unwilling were they to abandon it, that Moses found it necessary strictly to forbid the worship of anything “that is in heaven above”; notwithstanding which we find the Jews repeatedly committing the sin which had been so expressly forbidden.

Saturn was the star to whose worship they were more particularly addicted under the names of Moloch and Chium, (already mentioned in the passage quoted from Amos).

The planet Saturn was worshiped under the names of Moloch, Malcolm or Milcom by the Ammonites, the Canaanites, the Phoenicians, and the Carthaginians, and under that of Chium by the Israelites in the desert.

Saturn was worshiped among the Egyptians under the name of Raiphan, or as it is called in the Septuagint, Remphan. (For more about the Septuagint, see Freemasonry and the Bible.

(Acts 7:43): St. Stephen, quoting the passage of Amos, says: “ye took up the tabernacle of Moloch and the star of your god, Remphan”. (also see Acts 7:43).

Hale, in his Analysis of Chronology, says in alluding to the above passage:

“There is no direct evidence that the Israelites worshiped the Dog-Star in the wilderness, except this passage; but the indirect is very strong, drawn from the general prohibition of the worship of the sun, moon and stars, to which they must have been prone.

This was peculiarly an Egyptian idolatry, where the Dog-Star was worshiped, as notifying by his heliacal rising, or emersion from the sun’s rays, the regular commencement of the periodical inundation of the Nile.

The Israelite sculptures at the cemetery of Kibroth-Hattaavah, or graves of lust, in the neighborhood of Sinai, remarkably abound in hieroglyphics of the Dog-Star, represented as a human figure with a dog’s head.

There is express evidence that they sacrificed to the Dog-Star. In Josiah’s description of idolatry, where the Syriac Mazaloth (improperly termed planets) denotes the Dog-Star; in Arabic, Mazaroth.”

Notwithstanding a few discrepancies that may have occurred in the Masonic lectures, as arranged at various periods and by different authorities, the concurrent testimony of the ancient religions, and the hieroglyphic language, prove that the star was a symbol of God.

It was so used by the prophets of old in their metaphorical style, and it has so been generally adopted by Masonic instructors.

Masonic Blazing Star...As A Christian Emblem

The application of the Masonic Blazing Star as an emblem of the Savior has been made by those writers who give a Christian explanation of our emblems, and to the Christian Freemason, such an application will not be objectionable.

But those who desire to refrain from anything that may tend to impair the tolerance of our system, will be disposed to embrace a more universal explanation, which may be received alike by all the disciples of the Order, whatever may be their peculiar religious views.

Such persons will rather accept the expression of Doctor Oliver, who, though much disposed to give a Christian character to our Institution, says in his Symbol of Glory, page 292, “The Great Architect of the Universe is therefore symbolized in Freemasonry by the Blazing Star, as the Herald of our salvation.”


In fact, all round a very interesting article.

www.masonic-lodge-of-education.com...

I suspect that there is an issue of timing, in terms of the Babylonian captivity and the importation of the Babylonian calendar to Egypt...which came first could clarify much.



posted on Sep, 4 2014 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: KilgoreTrout

That is a very good article and I think it succinctly covers the evolution of the Blazing Star as a Masonic Emblem.



posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 05:51 AM
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a reply to: KilgoreTrout

A field is never going to be the apex of anything, it's were you plant your sacred Mes Tree, the Date Palm in the case of Enki and the Abzu enclosure.



It's only that lowest level that was seen as lending itself to being established on Earth also, the rest is climbing up the tree.




posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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Very Interesting.





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