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if man starts to live on different planets, how would we tell eachother's ages???

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posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 07:17 PM
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if man starts to live on different planets, how would we tell eachother's ages???

for example, if we start to live on mars, the mars year is longer than earth's year...

if i lived on mars for 10 mars years than came back to earth and lived there would i say: "hi i am 10 in mars years and X number of years on earth"???

its kinda wierd doing this...






posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 07:23 PM
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Perhaps people would adopt a "standard year" not tied to a particular planet's orbit around its primary.

Of course, if we as a race spread out to different planets, the different environments would probably, within a couple hundred generations, cause us to evolve so we wouldn't even be the same species any more!



posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by Off_The_Street
Perhaps people would adopt a "standard year" not tied to a particular planet's orbit around its primary.

Of course, if we as a race spread out to different planets, the different environments would probably, within a couple hundred generations, cause us to evolve so we wouldn't even be the same species any more!


yupp...

i heard this thought before...

only the future will tell...





posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by Off_The_Street
Perhaps people would adopt a "standard year" not tied to a particular planet's orbit around its primary.

Of course, if we as a race spread out to different planets, the different environments would probably, within a couple hundred generations, cause us to evolve so we wouldn't even be the same species any more!


I dont think evolution works that fast, I believe for even the minor changes takes thousands of years.



posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 08:14 PM
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Here is a link to answer some questions on evolution:

www.pbs.org...



posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 08:42 PM
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I think a earth year will be adopted by any humans that leave earth as the standard.

About evolution if humans were living on Mars for a few thousand years maybe even a few hundred, I would bet they would start to be alot weaker then humans born on earth. Since mars has about 0.38 Earth's gravity humans would not have to be as strong as they do on earth and their bones would not have to be as strong.

[edit on 5-12-2004 by ShadowXIX]



posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by ShadowXIX
I think a earth year will be adopted by any humans that leave earth as the standard.

About evolution if humans were living on Mars for a few thousand years maybe even a few hundred, I would bet they would start to be alot weaker then humans born on earth. Since mars has about 0.38 Earth's gravity humans would not have to be as strong as they do on earth and their bones would not have to be as strong.

[edit on 5-12-2004 by ShadowXIX]


Yes, but nothing of the human would change.

Like, say your born on Mars, and say your 25 years old, then you decide to live on earth, the only thing you would need to be is stronger, but overtime just from walking around and what not you would grow accustom to it, and then when your 60 and decide to go back to Mars to live It would feel strange to its low grav but within a few years it would be back to being "the norm".



posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 11:33 PM
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Yeah your right it would be more of a change due to the enviroment rather then evolution. If you worked out enough you might be able to cancel the effect you could still lift weights on mars but it would take more for the same effect.



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 07:51 PM
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May i suggest reading the red planet trilogy, by kim stanley robinson? great books.

we would, as stated, adopt a standard year of measure, to begin with. once mars becomes its own governing entity, it will undoubtebly count time in its own format. each will use the others' dates, but mainly their own. theres no point putting an extra date anywhere, nobody on mars is going to access data directly from earth, and vice-versa.

the reason i suggest the books, other than that they are great, is that she deals with the longer martian day very well. the extra half hour or so simply becomes a time slip. your clock counts, 11:59, 12:00, 12:00, 12:00, and so on until it is equalized with earth. although initially very odd, it makes sense. if you have different times you are in much more of a connundrum than just dates. its also a great time to have parties.



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by Amorymeltzer
May i suggest reading the red planet trilogy, by kim stanley robinson? great books.

we would, as stated, adopt a standard year of measure, to begin with. once mars becomes its own governing entity, it will undoubtebly count time in its own format. each will use the others' dates, but mainly their own. theres no point putting an extra date anywhere, nobody on mars is going to access data directly from earth, and vice-versa.

the reason i suggest the books, other than that they are great, is that she deals with the longer martian day very well. the extra half hour or so simply becomes a time slip. your clock counts, 11:59, 12:00, 12:00, 12:00, and so on until it is equalized with earth. although initially very odd, it makes sense. if you have different times you are in much more of a connundrum than just dates. its also a great time to have parties.


maybe, over the christmas vacation, i will read them...

Mars is my FAVORITE planet and i really want to live there one day...

only the future will tell...





posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by they see ALL

maybe, over the christmas vacation, i will read them...

Mars is my FAVORITE planet and i really want to live there one day...

only the future will tell...


really do, theyre lengthy, but theyre worth it. one of the best stories ive ever read, and ive read a lot. of everything.

i look forward to meeting you on one of Mars' new cities


[edit on 12/6/2004 by Amorymeltzer]



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by Amorymeltzer

really do, theyre lengthy, but theyre worth it. one of the best stories ive ever read, and ive read a lot. of everything.

i look forward to meeting you on one of Mars' new cities


[edit on 12/6/2004 by Amorymeltzer]


yupp...

i liked Ender's Game...

and i, too, look forward to meeting you on mars






posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:32 PM
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Another very interesting thing to think about when discussing living on other planets and how you will measure age is relativity. One of the principles of relativity states that the closer you are to a massive body such as the earth the slower time progresses. This is because there is a relation between energy of light and its frequency: the greater the energy the higher the frequency. This principle was tested in 1962 using a pair of very accurate clocks, mounted at the top and the bottom of a water tower. The clock at the bottom, which was nearer to the massive body, was found to run slower, in agreement with relativity.

So in other words if we colonize Mars the people who live there will actually age faster than their earth breathern. So just coming up with a standard year may not solve the problem.



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:41 PM
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Originally posted by BlackJackal
Another very interesting thing to think about when discussing living on other planets and how you will measure age is relativity. One of the principles of relativity states that the closer you are to a massive body such as the earth the slower time progresses. This is because there is a relation between energy of light and its frequency: the greater the energy the higher the frequency. This principle was tested in 1962 using a pair of very accurate clocks, mounted at the top and the bottom of a water tower. The clock at the bottom, which was nearer to the massive body, was found to run slower, in agreement with relativity.

So in other words if we colonize Mars the people who live there will actually age faster than their earth breathern. So just coming up with a standard year may not solve the problem.


very good example!!!

but can you explain it to me again because i don't get it...

the clock on the bottom was slower than the one on top???





posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 08:56 PM
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Originally posted by they see ALL
but can you explain it to me again because i don't get it...

the clock on the bottom was slower than the one on top???


yup. think of it as gravity bending space. the more mass, the more gravity, the more bending. the more bending, the slower time goes. and so, since earth weighs more than mars, those on earth will, in fact, age slower.

however, it wont make a bloody difference. the amount of time 'gained' by mars relative to us is going to be insignificant. besides, the times we all use are estimated anyway, everynow and then we have to adjust things to be proper. we can easily factor this in every 400 years or so (coincide with the leap year).



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by Amorymeltzer

yup. think of it as gravity bending space. the more mass, the more gravity, the more bending. the more bending, the slower time goes. and so, since earth weighs more than mars, those on earth will, in fact, age slower.

however, it wont make a bloody difference. the amount of time 'gained' by mars relative to us is going to be insignificant. besides, the times we all use are estimated anyway, everynow and then we have to adjust things to be proper. we can easily factor this in every 400 years or so (coincide with the leap year).


man, i thought i was good in physics


this is crazy stuff...





posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 09:13 PM
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Originally posted by they see ALL
man, i thought i was good in physics


this is crazy stuff...




hehe, it gets crazier. fun stuff though.



posted on Dec, 6 2004 @ 09:26 PM
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I believe when mankind does venture to other planets for habitation purposes, they'll have to adapt to the standard used here on Earth.

1 sec.=1 sec. anywhere in the universe, even when time bends. It will just be different for two different observers.

Take for instance when a traveler is approaching the speed of light. A stationary observer would see the traveler "come to a complete stop." Yet, to the traveler, the observer would seemingly "speed up" to where they would seem like a blur, yet 1 sec. would be 1 sec. to both the traveler and the observer.

Since Earth is the center of the universe,
with 1 astronomical unit = 1 Earth distance from the Sun, it would be logical for mankind to continue to use Earth based calculations throughout the universe, if they should go!

So a person on Mars for 2 Earth years may be 1 Mars year older, but in reality, they've aged by 2 Earth years, so don't card me when I buy a beer on Mars!


[edit on 6/12/04 by Intelearthling]



posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by Intelearthling
I believe when mankind does venture to other planets for habitation purposes, they'll have to adapt to the standard used here on Earth.

1 sec.=1 sec. anywhere in the universe, even when time bends. It will just be different for two different observers.

Take for instance when a traveler is approaching the speed of light. A stationary observer would see the traveler "come to a complete stop." Yet, to the traveler, the observer would seemingly "speed up" to where they would seem like a blur, yet 1 sec. would be 1 sec. to both the traveler and the observer.

Since Earth is the center of the universe,
with 1 astronomical unit = 1 Earth distance from the Sun, it would be logical for mankind to continue to use Earth based calculations throughout the universe, if they should go!

So a person on Mars for 2 Earth years may be 1 Mars year older, but in reality, they've aged by 2 Earth years, so don't card me when I buy a beer on Mars!


[edit on 6/12/04 by Intelearthling]


cool example...

this is a really good discusion and i am glad that i started this thread...





posted on Dec, 7 2004 @ 03:44 PM
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I think the usage of years could go through a series of stages...

1.) The crews and colonists use Earth years during the trip and beginnings of the colony; when the colony is still most dependant on Earth.

2.) The colony, still depending on Earth but also creating its own industry, will have this intermediate step. The year could be measured in how long it take for Earth to be in reasonable position to send supplies/people back and forth.

3.) Once the colony is no longer dependant on Earth it would go to what others have already said; Having its own time scale, but also using Earth's in order to keep some things in order.




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