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Any Members Born Deaf? Question

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posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: Woodcarver

In short? Yes, it's terribly frustrating. I can "see" what I'm trying to say and the point I'm trying to make but translating something really complex into words is where I'm most likely to get impatient, frustrated, sullen or even just flat out give up (with a huff, of course). You can ask my fiance all about that one because that's when I'm also my most expressive. I don't even say "you don't understand what I'm saying". 99% of the time, I say "you aren't seeing what I'm trying to say" or "you don't see it" and/or "I'm trying to figure out how to describe what I'm seeing but I just can't explain it right." Those are my exact words nearly every time. All the descriptions about what I'm thinking have always been "see". It's the thing that makes me the saddest actually. Cue Trip Like I Do by Filter in the noggin, lol.

I read the dictionary when I was young to basically try to bolster up my available vocabulary in an effort to help communicate better. Most stuff just pops kind of automated out of my mouth so there's frequently no review. Gets me into trouble a lot. However, I've learned to just keep listening before opening my trap and take that extra effort if it's something that seems to be important or delicate to whomever I'm talking with. When I was younger? lol, I had no idea until after the listener was clearly responding negatively to something that what I had just said was rude. I got in trouble. A LOT.




posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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originally posted by: VoidHawk

originally posted by: Woodcarver
I would also bet that if we searched hard enough we could find some music composed by deaf people. I wonder if they could tell the dif. I'm sure we could

Post above yours



yea see how easy that was for me?



posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 06:03 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

how are you artistically? do you write or draw?



posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: dollukka
a reply to: VoidHawk

Its a vibrations not a sound. My grandparents were both deaf, Grandpa was born deaf and Grandma lost her hearing during a war. Grandma did hear a bit with hearing device and Grandpa sensed the vibrations. I believe he also had some kind of 6th sense and he always knew if i was being mischievous.
What comes to reading we imagine the voices so i believe born deaf imagine the vibrations. Deafs can hear loud sounds when those are over 100db but the sounds they hear they can´t recognize, it's more like a solid continuous sound which has no highs or lows in tone.


That's the super interesting thing about those born deaf is that their other faculties seem to get amped up on steroids. A good friend of mine and her daughter were both born deaf and I'm the number one babysitter for the daughter. Even though both have hearing devices to help them hear somewhat, it's very interesting to watch her just being herself. The only time her eyes are ever fixed are when someone is speaking to her (she reads lips) or she's playing a video game. The rest of the time, it's all eye work. Those blue eyes of hers are darting around everywhere. She can also pick up vibrations pretty quick as well like your grandfather. She'll know when someone is coming down the stairs before ever hearing or seeing them.

a reply to: Woodcarver

I can only copy what I see. I'm very good at that. Missed my calling as an art forger, I guess, lol. As far as drawing something creatively? Zilch in that department. I do write poetry. It comes out pretty much like possession. Just put my hand to the paper and it pours out fully formed with no awareness of where it came from. Go figure.
edit on 25/8/14 by WhiteAlice because: added second reply

edit on 25/8/14 by WhiteAlice because: forgot the other part of the question



posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 06:12 PM
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a reply to: Woodcarver

i looked for "vibration music" for the deaf, couldn't find anything. it HAS to have been done already...
but i did contact the Chicago Hearing Society and told them I'd like to compose some pieces using -20Hz vibrations, with chords and some rhythms, then bring a low-frequency tactile transducer system there and try them out.

i have a friend who has one of those slide tunable didgiridoos. i bet with the bell on a wood floor, deaf people could feel that, and the differences in pitches. I've attended a few gong-baths that you could feel the vibrations from as well.



posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice
Always found that fascinating too.
My ex-wife's Mom's ex-boyfriend is a blind piano tuner. He takes the train all over the city by himself doing it, and he's an amazingly gifted musician.
It's hilarious watching him eat. Because of his amazingly amped-up sense of touch, he doesn't use utensils. He just grabs the food with his hands and shovels it on in. He makes a huge mess and just doesn't care. It was awesome at restaurants!



posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: KAOStheory

That got me curious about whether those born blind use visual imagery at all. Turns out they do and they construct imagery. It's just not the same as those with sight. They have spatial ability but sans the visual imagery aspect of it. So while a sighted person with spatial ability can look at an object and turn it, the blind may use the same skill to generate objects and rooms in their heads. Neat.

www.livescience.com...
www.academia.edu...



posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

Yep, they have very vivid eyesight and get much more data through their eyes that norms do. I guess my Granpa read me well when i was about to do something tomboyish



posted on Aug, 25 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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originally posted by: dollukka
a reply to: WhiteAlice

Yep, they have very vivid eyesight and get much more data through their eyes that norms do. I guess my Granpa read me well when i was about to do something tomboyish


Or felt a disturbance in the force for sure. Autism is like that but without the absence of a sense. The end result in severe cases of autism is a completely uncommunicative individual because they're taking in too much. It actually has me toying with a theory. Babies, when they are little, are highly visual beasts that are prone towards sensory overload. Put a baby in a noisy, raucous environment too long and they get overstimulated and cranky as hell. That normalizes as the child develops and grows older. In a baby who is missing a sense, those functioning senses maintain the heightened sensory processing as a fact of survival so instead of diminishing as the child ages, usage of that extra oomph maintains it. Interestingly enough, there was a study done on autism (normal iq high functioning--no savants there as they are a whole different set) that showed that children with autism had tactile sensory deficits that adults with autism did not have.

So maybe it goes like this...the blind maintain an amped up hearing and touch to compensate for their impaired sense of sight. The deaf amp up their sight and touch to compensate for their impaired sense of hearing. Maybe the autistic amp up their hearing and sight to compensate for a delay in tactile development? Problem with the last one is that it auto-corrects. I definitely feel and in fact, nothing can creep me out more than a bad texture.

Hrmmm...

Tactile impairment and autism paper: www.sciencedirect.com...


edit on 25/8/14 by WhiteAlice because: added paper link



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: KAOStheory

Ok...I will stress again. The "hearing" part is off. They would "FEEL" it in their chests. So Im sure you mean could THAT FEELING be recognizable as their own...FEELING (not as hearing).

I absolute agree with you! That feeling of vibrations are just as identifiable and unique to them!

Thanks!



posted on Aug, 27 2014 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

Right right. For instance, you kick a bass drum tuned at "C" then one tuned at "D".
We hear the higher-end "click" and '"punch" sound, as well as feel the low vibration.
The deaf would only feel the vibration. Vibration can be felt from tones above the hearing range as well as below it.



posted on Aug, 27 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: KAOStheory

Additionally? The deaf like to dance as much as anyone. And they "feel" the music and rythmn by the vibrations.



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