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GPS Discovers the West Is So Dry, It's Rising

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posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: Mianeye

I dont know why this didn't dawn on me until I read your post. Heat= expansion Cooling=contraction. Mountains have more heat near the surface because there is more mass to produce pressure near the surface. Lose ground water, get warmer ground, get expanding rock?




posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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Is it true that ants make the grass grow by tugging on it?



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 09:41 PM
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I'm thinking the way it works is like a wet sponge. The weight of the water weighs it down and lowers the height of the sponge. When it's dry the sponge dries out and fluffs up, increasing it's dimensions.

edit: another poster pointed it out before me. Lots of water related reports and this big drought. Very strange and we messed up the planet.
edit on 22-8-2014 by Yeahkeepwatchingme because: extra



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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Sound a bit like what happening here in northwest Ontario first we had the glacier which
melted then we got some supper big lake bigger then all the great lake now so now the land is coming up
and the lake around here are lower

Lake Agassiz



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 10:04 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Oddly, there is nothing particularly unusual going on here.

Geosynclines

The geosyncline known as the Gulf of Mexico will likely, one day, be the largest mountain range in the world.. wont be any time soon though



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 10:15 PM
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originally posted by: beezzer
Wouldn't it be a hoot if GPS somehow caused it to rise?

(Schrödinger's Mountain)


Dammit Beezer, I caught a case of the lolz after reading that.
Funniest thing I've read in a while on ATS. Heres your prize . Unfortunately its Natty Ice... I'm on a budget .



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 10:16 PM
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Sorry, I don't have time to read all posts. What if it's tectonic plates shifting? That would make more sense to me. Got your bugout bags ready?



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: w8tn4it

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Geology...



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 10:41 PM
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California has been "drying out" since the 1800's.

There are many examples of dried out lakes and marshes.



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: DeepImpactX

That is because people think it's a big pocket that contains the water.
Actually it's very very small pockets and cracks in the rock and relatively loose soil/ and sandstone, some rock can actually contain a lot of water that is not directly visible and still feel compact, it's kind of like a sponge.
The water isn't flowing completely free, it has to find a way through the rock or sediments, though there are underground rivers but they are kind of different.

Some water rest or flow on top of bedrock, and some goes deeper into the bedrock itself.

So when you suck the water out of the rock or loose sediments there is no collapse, there might be some compacting of loose sediments.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 12:19 AM
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originally posted by: DeepImpactX
I'm sorry, but this makes no sense to me. I was never good at science, but land rising because of a lack of water underneath it doesn't make sense. And the mountains rising for the same reason makes even less.

Water has substance right? If water is underneath something else of substance, like the earth, and the water goes away then the earth will lower because of gravity. Right? When a sponge loses water it shrinks. Right? Seriously, someone set me straight with this.

Know what I think? I think there are pranksters out there raising those stations just enough to freak pepole out. That's what I think.


This isn't rocket science. Wet things way more. Go grab a dry towel and pile it in your hand. Not very heavy right? Now soak the towel. It's heavy. Water laden soils are actually heavier than dry.

Now, we typically imagine that if you dig down deep into the earth, it'll be just a ton of dirt. It's actually way cooler than that down there and is actually layers. Not all layers of dirt, depending on what caused those formations are less permeable (less able to pass water through them) than others. In some cases, particularly in deserts, you can actually get an impermeable layer that forms (called hard pan) that causes the water to sit up top and results in flash flooding during rainstorms. In non-desert areas, you can dig down and start hitting saturated soils after a few feet, depending on where you live. That's called the water table and so you do have a thick heavy towel effect down there that acts like an immense suppression device. Now remember that it's not all solid dirt to the core down there but that there's actually a liquid ocean of magma underneath us.

It'd be like taking that heavy towel and sticking it on a towel sized boat. Boat is going to sink down a little. Dry towel, it's not going to sink very much.

Take away the water, it moves upward because of relief. Just have to remember that we're all floating here.

Make sense now?



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: Trillium

Star for teaching me something I'd never heard of before. I appreciate that.




posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 01:52 AM
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originally posted by: DeepImpactX
I'm sorry, but this makes no sense to me. I was never good at science, but land rising because of a lack of water underneath it doesn't make sense. And the mountains rising for the same reason makes even less.

Water has substance right? If water is underneath something else of substance, like the earth, and the water goes away then the earth will lower because of gravity. Right? When a sponge loses water it shrinks. Right? Seriously, someone set me straight with this.

Know what I think? I think there are pranksters out there raising those stations just enough to freak pepole out. That's what I think.


All land "floats" on magma so if you remove water from under a mountain you're removing water from land that floats above the under lying layers of the earth, effectively reducing the weight of the mountain even though you're removing something from underneath it. One cubic mile of water weighs over 9 trillion lbs. One rain storm produces nearly 10b lbs of water over 100sq miles. water is incredibly heavy on these large scales.

Removing that much water from the land can easily cause land masses to rise.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 07:25 AM
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So California is utilized to much water. That lack of water is leading to physical changes in the Earth. California is allowing millions of illegal aliens into their state. The millions of illegal are utilized more water, which will cause more physical changes to the earth. Therefore

Illegal Allen's = Climate Change




posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

The west coast honey industry has also dried up.

abcnews.go.com...

California's honey production is 10% of what it was in 2003, when it was the country's largest supplier.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 09:07 AM
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originally posted by: thinline
So California is utilized to much water. That lack of water is leading to physical changes in the Earth. California is allowing millions of illegal aliens into their state. The millions of illegal are utilized more water, which will cause more physical changes to the earth. Therefore

Illegal Allen's = Climate Change



Of course! Why didn't I think of that?



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 09:10 AM
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originally posted by: Mianeye
a reply to: DeepImpactX
The earth crust is very flexible, the water is/was in the ground not underneath it.

In this case it's the weight of the water that weighs down the crust of earth, when that weight of water is gone the flexibility of the earth crust will make it rise and the magma underneath the crust will push it up.

I'm just surprised it haven't caused any earthquakes as that seems to be a lot of movement in an already tense earthquake area.



Hm.m.m.m...Best description I've come across for what's happening.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 09:51 AM
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Possibilities:

Expanding earth theory

Geophysical events such as plate tectonics

Bulging magma chambers

Galactic motions pulling at Earth's core

Alterations at Earth's core affecting mantle

Magnetics

The rising because of lack of water seems the least likely cause IMO.

Research suggests that rising mountains caused the arid conditions of the Gobi desert. Many mountain ranges are rising and not because of lack of water.

news.stanford.edu...


Rising mountains dried out Central Asia, Stanford scientists say

The uplift of two mountain ranges in Central Asia beginning 30 million years ago expanded the Gobi Desert and set Central Asia on its path to extreme aridity, a Stanford study suggests.


www.factmonster.com...


THE ANDES
The Andes is the longest mountain range on land. It was formed along the western margin of South America, where two tectonic plates (rocky plates that make up the Earth’s crust) collided. The mountains are still rising by about 10 cm (4 in) every century.


www.amnh.org...


One might think that all this precipitation and glaciation would grind down these mountains faster than tectonic plates can collide to push them up. Yet St. Elias is the steepest mountain belt in the world, rising from sea level to more than 5,500 meters in just 10 kilometers. (To compare, the peaks in the Himalayas rise from a base that’s already 4,600 meters above sea level. From that baseline, Everest is “just” 4,300 meters high. St. Elias is also among the world’s fastest growing ranges, rising 3 to 4 millimeters per year.


www.sciencedaily.com...


Mountain Ranges Rise Dramatically Faster Than Expected
Date:
January 26, 2006
Source:University of Rochester

Summary:
Two new studies by a University of Rochester researcher show that mountain ranges rise to their height in as little as two million years -- several times faster than geologists have always thought. Each of the findings came from two pioneering methods of measuring ancient mountain elevations, and the results are in tight agreement.

Both studies yielded the same results: between 10 million and 7 million years ago, the Andes shot up.

edit on 23-8-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 09:57 AM
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The article and it's headline is not written very well, I think this article does a much better job of explaining the phenomena:

GPS is Tracking West’s Vanishing Water, Scientists Surprised to Learn


To their surprise, researchers have discovered that the GPS network has also been recording an entirely different phenomenon: the massive drying of the landscape caused by the drought that has intensified over much of the region since last year.

Geophysicist Adrian Borsa of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and his colleagues report in this week's Science that, based on the GPS measurements, the loss of water from lakes, streams, snowpack, and groundwater totals some 240 billion metric tons—equivalent, they say, to a four-inch-deep layer of water covering the entire western U.S. from the Rockies to the Pacific. (Related: "Water's Hidden Crisis"

The principle behind the new measurements is simple. The weight of surface water and groundwater deforms Earth's elastic crust, much as a sleeper's body deforms a mattress. Remove the water, and the crust rebounds.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 03:02 PM
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What amazes me is that human beings can detect a half inch change in the height of a mountain.
edit on 23-8-2014 by eboli because: (no reason given)



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