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Question About Ebola

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posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:07 AM
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Do you become immune to Ebola(and sister viruses) after catching and surviving it? I need this information for my strange conspiracy mind to work properly.

Having trouble finding legitimate source that says how patients who've survived interact with the virus afterward.




posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: OrphanApology
Do you become immune to Ebola(and sister viruses) after catching and surviving it? I need this information for my strange conspiracy mind to work properly.

Having trouble finding legitimate source that says how patients who've survived interact with the virus afterward.


Work on monkeys suggests that if immunity exists after infection, it is likely that is is virus strain-specific.

However in response to your question; "nobody Knows" as there have been no "second clinical infections",



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: OrphanApology
Do you become immune to Ebola(and sister viruses) after catching and surviving it? I need this information for my strange conspiracy mind to work properly.

Having trouble finding legitimate source that says how patients who've survived interact with the virus afterward.

Apparently the doctor recently released in Atlanta may have been saved by being treated with an ebola survivor's blood via tranfusion.

"Yesterday, an experimental serum arrived in the country, but there was only enough for one person. Dr. Brantly asked that it be given to Nancy Writebol," Franklin Graham, president of Samaritan's Purse, in a statement. "However, Dr. Brantly received a unit of blood from a 14-year-old boy who had survived Ebola because of Dr. Brantly's care. The young boy and his family wanted to be able to help the doctor that saved his life."

CBS News



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Very interesting. Especially in light of the new information that points toward the original black plague as potentially being more Ebola like than anything.

What's also really interesting is that inoculations can be given through tattoo guns using far less serum and the body having far less reactions than traditional intravenous methods.

I was just curious.

Any other information would be greatly appreciated.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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It depends. Some people can become carriers of a virus having it reside in their bodies and not expressing itself. Sort of like the shingles virus. I don't think that people can catch the virus from people with shingles though.

Now they would have to actually study this, some people have natural immunity to things and are carriers also, never showing sickness or just a very brief sickness. These people can pass things on to others. I do not know if this can happen with Ebola though.

I guess we just have to hope our immune system, which part of is our subconscious and it's creation of cravings that can help us fight things. Our subconscious should cause us to get a craving that stimulates special virus fighting T-cells if we get in contact with it. This is genetic knowledge tied to our past consumption of foods. Our body's genetics does know what is in foods, it is not just our mind that holds all the knowledge.

The mind is a processor with a huge onboard memory chip. It is tied to many other circuit boards in our body, all of which have memory chips with capacities that dwarf what is in computer cards. The wiring is in our bodies electrolytes and there are also chemical triggers that trip things. No signal, no life in that card. If the signal is distorted, then the card does not operate correctly. Chemicals are not the only things that run our bodies as many think, their creation is controlled by signals shared between all the circuit boards.

I tried to compare our body to a computer but have to say that no computer made presently comes even close to the physiology that even a small mammal has. We have been steered to believe otherwise but it isn't so. The computing capacity of a seagull is not even in the the same class as a super computer. The seagull is far supperior, even the best of planes can't fly like a seagull on their own and run on garbage. That will take us hundreds of years to get even close to developing at our present rate, and the way things are going, I doubt if we have that long left here on earth.
edit on 21-8-2014 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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originally posted by: OrphanApology
Do you become immune to Ebola(and sister viruses) after catching and surviving it? I need this information for my strange conspiracy mind to work properly.

Having trouble finding legitimate source that says how patients who've survived interact with the virus afterward.


They say yes, immunity. However, one of the physicians who contracted Ebola from Sawyer in Nigeria was treated and released. Then she died of Ebola-like symptoms. Haven't heard anything conclusive about official cause of death.

I wonder this: Since viruses mutate, will a person who has immunity now, have immunity to all future strains? Just look at flu shots. People get them every year b/c one year's flu exposure does not provide immunity to future strains.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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I have a friend that's always telling me my body is telling me it needs something. I've gotten good with, I need an avacado my skin is breaking out. I know
These are good for your liver.

I absolutely love when I crave chocolate! Its a great antioxidant. I'm not an expert on letting my food heal me. I'm a beginner, it seems to be working very well.

a reply to: rickymouse



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: OrphanApology

Unknown - but it IS known that like the new bird flu's, Ebola kills by putting the immune system into hyperdrive and causing a "cytokine storm." ...Weird how that all works. And they're too, too dangerous to study properly. (Can't purposefully reinfect people.) ...Some studies in Gabon suggest people DO acquire immunity from environmental exposures but little is known for sure.




ETA: Good question. F&S&











edit on 21/8/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)






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