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75% of Ebola Victims are Women

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posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:24 AM
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Reports say the reason 75% of Ebola cases and deaths are women is because of their role as primary care-givers, nurses and traders within their communities. It's the obvious conclusion, but I wonder. Could there be another explanation?


75% of Ebola Victims are Women

About 75 per cent of people contracting Ebola are women because they are often the primary care-givers, nurses and traders within their communities, health officials have said.

….The Ministry of Health in Liberia also said about 75 per cent of the Ebola deaths it has counted so far have been women, Buzz Feed reports.




posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:27 AM
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They have more ''fluids''.. (bad joke).

Does seems a bit logical though since woman mostly do the caring part, even at home so they also come in fysicial contact, males much less.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

I would think that this explanation so far makes the most sense considering how Ebola is spread. Women in these African countries are essentially workhorses that feed, clean, bathe, and everything else when a member falls ill. If you can trust the WHO(which you can't but it's the same information found everywhere in regard to ebola transmission):




Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals. In Africa, infection has been documented through the handling of infected chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest.

Ebola then spreads in the community through human-to-human transmission, with infection resulting from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and indirect contact with environments contaminated with such fluids. Burial ceremonies in which mourners have direct contact with the body of the deceased person can also play a role in the transmission of Ebola. Men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus through their semen for up to 7 weeks after recovery from illness.

Health-care workers have frequently been infected while treating patients with suspected or confirmed EVD. This has occurred through close contact with patients when infection control precautions are not strictly practiced.

Among workers in contact with monkeys or pigs infected with Reston ebolavirus, several infections have been documented in people who were clinically asymptomatic. Thus, RESTV appears less capable of causing disease in humans than other Ebola species.

However, the only available evidence available comes from healthy adult males. It would be premature to extrapolate the health effects of the virus to all population groups, such as immuno-compromised persons, persons with underlying medical conditions, pregnant women and children. More studies of RESTV are needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn about the pathogenicity and virulence of this virus in humans.


www.who.int...
There could be a gender related explanation but just judging from conditions this one makes the most sense to me.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:32 AM
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NO, there is no better explanation.

Women are the primary caregivers, my first thought

You won't see very many men willing to care for loved ones sick with anything let alone Ebola.

My husband tries when I am sick, and he is a fairly modern thinking man, but his idea of care is bringing me stuff (food/drink/tv remote)

Most womens idea of caring for the sick is, wiping off their sweat, and doing touchy feely things to care for people.

These are inborn traits in males and females, females are more physically nurturing, men tend to nurture by provision, left over evolutionary traits from cave man days. (some of you will still blast me for this non PC statement - but I taught Human Development in colleges for years and know this is true overall in general, but not in specific cases)

It is the female style of care that quite rapidly spreads Ebola.



edit on 9Thu, 21 Aug 2014 09:34:10 -0500am82108amk214 by grandmakdw because: clarity
edit on 9Thu, 21 Aug 2014 09:35:22 -0500am82108amk214 by grandmakdw because: spelling
edit on 9Thu, 21 Aug 2014 09:36:22 -0500am82108amk214 by grandmakdw because: grammar



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:39 AM
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Kenema (Sierra Leone) (AFP) - It has laid waste to the tribal chiefdoms of Sierra Leone, leaving hundreds dead, but the Ebola crisis began with just one healer's claims to special powers. The outbreak need never have spread from Guinea, health officials revealed to AFP, except for a herbalist in the remote eastern border village of Sokoma.

"She was claiming to have powers to heal Ebola. Cases from Guinea were crossing into Sierra Leone for treatment," Mohamed Vandi, the top medical official in the hard-hit district of Kenema, told AFP. "She got infected and died. During her funeral, women around the other towns got infected."

LINK

Not only that women care most there is also this tradition of so called healers, some of them do it just for money and reputation and many of them are just fakes. More "magic" there is more people believe in what they do.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: dollukka

Sounds like the American healthcare system.

Guess there is "magicks" no matter where you're located.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

That is the obvious reason, but I wonder too. Are you thinking that women are more likely to have a compromised immune system, or something like that?

Very interesting, S&F



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: soficrow

That is the obvious reason, but I wonder too. Are you thinking that women are more likely to have a compromised immune system, or something like that?

Very interesting, S&F


My guess was the OP thinks Ebola is a genetically engineered virus as part of some sort of conspiracy.

I think, I may be wrong, the OP is wondering if it was genetically engineered to be more easily transmitted to females.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: grandmakdw

I agree with the caregiver role conclusion.

A whole other issue which may further result in women being more likely to be infected:

The Ebola virus can remain alive/transmittable in semen up to several months beyond the recovery of a male Ebola patient. How many women does the average man have relations with in that time period? (Rhetorical question because... who knows???) Point is, I'm just throwing this concept out there as a possible additional reason that women may be more affected.

If each recovered man had sex with 3 women within the 3 month window, well... you get the picture.
edit on 8/21/2014 by new_here because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: grandmakdw

Oh, I see, thanks grandmakdw
. That's horrible. I'm a crap conspiracy theorist, I don't think mean enough!
So no women, no babies, no future? That is a bleak outlook, very evil.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: grandmakdw

Oh, I see, thanks grandmakdw
. That's horrible. I'm a crap conspiracy theorist, I don't think mean enough!
So no women, no babies, no future? That is a bleak outlook, very evil.



I've been on this site long enough to see how people think when they ask questions like this.

Now, I admit I could be wrong about what the OP is trying to get at, but the OP never said, so we can only hypothesize.

I'm going for a common conspiracy type reason that would be found on ATS, again, I'm not a mind reader and can only guess.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:04 AM
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originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: grandmakdw

I agree with the caregiver role conclusion.

A whole other issue which may further result in women being more likely to be infected:

The Ebola virus can remain alive/transmittable in semen up to several months beyond the recovery of a male Ebola patient. How many women does the average man have relations with in that time period? (Rhetorical question because... who knows???) Point is, I'm just throwing this concept out there as a possible additional reason that women may be more affected.

If each recovered man had sex with 3 women within the 3 month window, well... you get the picture.


excellent point

And Africa has different mores regarding sex than many in the west do.

Multiple sexual partners is not frowned upon on Africa as it is in other places in the world.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: dollukka

Just to clarify - many reports say the Ebola epidemic started in Kenema, Sierra Leone, at the hospital where the US-based consortium was researching viral hemorrhagic fevers (including Ebola).



In collaboration with its research partners from the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Consortium (VHFC), Corgenix recently completed a multi-year study conducted at the Kenema Government Hospital (KGH) in Kenema, Sierra Leone. The clinical trial investigated the clinical utility of several VHFC diagnostic products, including Corgenix' recently CE marked ReLASV(R) Antigen Rapid Test for Lassa virus. The VHFC is a collaboration of academic and industry members headed by Tulane University and partially funded with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

[NOTE: This consortium includes military bio-war scientists from Fort Dettrick.]








posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:21 AM
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originally posted by: grandmakdw

originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: grandmakdw

I agree with the caregiver role conclusion.

A whole other issue which may further result in women being more likely to be infected:

The Ebola virus can remain alive/transmittable in semen up to several months beyond the recovery of a male Ebola patient. How many women does the average man have relations with in that time period? (Rhetorical question because... who knows???) Point is, I'm just throwing this concept out there as a possible additional reason that women may be more affected.

If each recovered man had sex with 3 women within the 3 month window, well... you get the picture.


excellent point

And Africa has different mores regarding sex than many in the west do.

Multiple sexual partners is not frowned upon on Africa as it is in other places in the world.


True that. And considering they've had a difficult time convincing them to fore-go their burial customs, how much more difficult is it to convince them not to have sex for 3 months! I think they are distributing condoms, but they can't exacltly police them to make sure they use them.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:29 AM
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originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: grandmakdw

Oh, I see, thanks grandmakdw
. That's horrible. I'm a crap conspiracy theorist, I don't think mean enough!
So no women, no babies, no future? That is a bleak outlook, very evil.



There is a book about just that thing ... "The White Plague" by Frank Herbert. An engineered virus that kills only women.

The White Plague
edit on 21-8-2014 by eeyipes because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: beansidhe
a reply to: grandmakdw
a reply to: new_here
a reply to: OrphanApology

About a decade ago, when women in Africa were dramatically and disproportionately found infected with HIV/AIDS, I tripped over several studies showing that the unprecedented rates of HIV/AIDS infections in African women resulted from the very successful campaign for pre-natal healthcare. Turns out limited budgets forced medical personnel to re-use speculums, needles and other devices that ended up transmitting the virus between patients in the pre-natal clinics.

...As women tend to seek healthcare in clinics and hospitals MUCH more than men do, seems likely the same "risks" are in play here.

...Add to that the very real possibility that the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Consortium (VHFC) researchers were most likely using patients from the Kenema Hospital to test out their "rapid diagnostic testing" for Lassa and Ebola - well, the conspiracy theory pretty much writes itself.


AGAIN:

In collaboration with its research partners from the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Consortium (VHFC), Corgenix recently completed a multi-year study conducted at the Kenema Government Hospital (KGH) in Kenema, Sierra Leone.

The VHFC is a collaboration of academic and industry members headed by Tulane University and partially funded with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

[NOTE: The Consortium includes military bio-war scientists from Fort Dettrick.]


Press Release - Corgenix expands Lassa virus rapid test research to Ebola test development


The DoD gave a contract worth $140 million dollars to Tekmira, a Canadian pharmaceutical company, to conduct Ebola research, which apparently involved injecting and infusing healthy humans with the deadly Ebola virus.

The DoD is listed as a collaborator in a “First in Human” Ebola clinical trial (NCT02041715, which started in January 2014 shortly before an Ebola epidemic was declared in West Africa in March.


Four out of five families who contracted Ebola in 1979 received the deadly virus from a local hospital, according to a World Health Organization report from 1983.

“Between 31 July and 6 October 1979, 34 cases of Ebola virus disease (22 of which were fatal) occurred among five families in a rural district of southern Sudan; the disease was introduced into four of the families from a local hospital. Chains of secondary spread within the family …”







edit on 21/8/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)
edit on 21/8/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)
edit on 21/8/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:33 AM
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There could be another reason. There are differences in the chemistry balances of men and women which could make them more susceptable. We cannot discount this idea just because there is the other relationship without evidence to show it is not happening. This happens a lot in the world today, we ignore things that may be important because we think we know what is going on. S&F.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: soficrow


Ok, so I was correct in my assumption of what you were trying to get at in your OP

Thanks for the confirmation.

I don't agree with you, but appreciate the clarification

and all the research you have done to support your theory.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 10:57 AM
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originally posted by: grandmakdw
a reply to: soficrow


Ok, so I was correct in my assumption of what you were trying to get at in your OP

Thanks for the confirmation.

I don't agree with you, but appreciate the clarification

and all the research you have done to support your theory.


My guess was the OP thinks Ebola is a genetically engineered virus as part of some sort of conspiracy.

I think, I may be wrong, the OP is wondering if it was genetically engineered to be more easily transmitted to females.


You are totally misinterpreting -and misrepresenting- the information I have provided. I do NOT think the virus was "genetically engineered to be more easily transmitted to females." You did NOT get that from what I posted. It's not at all what I said or might have implied. But very interesting you want this post dismissed as the rantings of a crazy conspiracy theorist, and buried.



posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

I wasn't implying you were crazy.

You did great research.

I just don't agree that it was purposely set upon the world. Some things are, I just think, not this.

Population killing virus come along regularly in history,

and globally,

where they come from is normally a mystery,

but they happen and it is part of the normal (although awful and terrible) cycle of life on earth.

They happened long before genetic manipulation of viruses was even possible,

and will continue to happen as long as there is life on earth, sad but a true fact of the history of the earth.

Didn't mean to insult you or derail the thread. Sorry if I came off that way, communication is after all 90% nonverbal, and we only have the verbal to work with here on ATS.





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