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Best Bass Players

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posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 11:01 PM
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originally posted by: Bilk22
John Entwistle

I have to agree with this. He's the first who came to mind upon seeing the thread title. Wasn't even going to post, but I saw someone agreed with me
Entwistle was a pioneer for the instrument in many ways.





posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

For your viewing and listening enjoyment





posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 11:20 PM
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a reply to: Bilk22

This explains what he did for the bass and rock in general.




posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 11:20 PM
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a reply to: Bilk22

Epic! I don't know if he's the "best," but damn he's funky! Certainly my favorite



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 11:31 PM
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Good call on Entwistle.

Danny Glover from Deep Purple



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 12:39 AM
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This thread was posted on John Deacon's birthday. He was awesome.

Philippe Bissonnette, Jannick Top, and Bernard Paganotti are gods. Look them up.

Stanley Clarke kicks the crap out of Jaco any day.

Doug Keyser of WatchTower is great, too.

Kinley Wolfe (Barney) is pretty scary.



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 03:00 AM
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a reply to: ZetaRediculian

No love for Roger Waters yet? For shame. JPJ is a fav.

Carol Kaye and James Jamerson...

Story goes, Marvin Gaye specifically requested him for the session, someone went and found him drunk in a bar playing a jazz gig, and he rocorded this while laying down on the floor.


And of course... that one guy in that band.



edit on 8202014 by CloudsTasteMetallic because: forgot vid link



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 07:27 AM
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originally posted by: NarcolepticBuddha

originally posted by: Bilk22
John Entwistle

I have to agree with this. He's the first who came to mind upon seeing the thread title. Wasn't even going to post, but I saw someone agreed with me
Entwistle was a pioneer for the instrument in many ways.



John Entwistle was regarded by his peers as the greatest bass player.

If that was good enough for them then that's good enough for me.



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 07:51 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
Those guys are just show-offs. The best bass players in the world are (and were) people like James Jamerson and Paul McCartney.


Sorry to sound blunt, but you really have no idea what your talking about .
Theres a technicality and finesse that these guys incorperate into jamming that is not found in many other bassists .
Maybe you should do abit of research or listen to some music beyond your personal bias .
Paul McCartney had some great basslines but to call people like Flea and Woten showoffs is totally ignorant and asanine.

- A Bassist



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 08:04 AM
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I think Fieldy is up there, different class but still deserves a spot in this thread IMO.



He can groove for sure .
edit on 20/8/2014 by Omega85 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 11:59 AM
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Stanley Clarke and Marcus Miller for sure. In the Rock world you have to consider Chris Squire (from Yes) as one of the best. Sting was no slouch either.



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 12:09 PM
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Some great bassists here, no doubt, but it does not have to be fast or flashy.

Monolithic and eternal basslines work too

Robbie Shakespeare
Flabba Holt
George Fulwood
Leroy Sibbles

are some true greats



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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I'm shocked that I'm 2 pages into this and not a single whisper of the name Mingus
Greatest jazz bassist of all time and one of the best composers ever to stride the earth.


To everyone who posted about Entwistle- spot on. The Ox could play circles around any of his peers including John Paul Jones who was no slouch at all.

Jack Bruce is another under rated guy from that era as well.

It's not about flash and pomp. You're not worth your salt on bass if you don't know how to get yourself in the pocket and lay down a groove too. When I was in my 20's sure, I was definitely a show off but over the years I've learned that
It requires a delicate balance and everything has its place. It's just a matter of knowing when and where to show off a little. That's what I love about Entwistle. He knew when to lay back and get in that pocket with Moon but could out play just about anyone else that came before or after him.
edit on 20-8-2014 by peter vlar because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: CloudsTasteMetallic


No love for Roger Waters yet?



one of these days.



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 07:26 PM
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originally posted by: peter vlar
I'm shocked that I'm 2 pages into this and not a single whisper of the name Mingus
Greatest jazz bassist of all time and one of the best composers ever to stride the earth.


To everyone who posted about Entwistle- spot on. The Ox could play circles around any of his peers including John Paul Jones who was no slouch at all.

Jack Bruce is another under rated guy from that era as well.

It's not about flash and pomp. You're not worth your salt on bass if you don't know how to get yourself in the pocket and lay down a groove too. When I was in my 20's sure, I was definitely a show off but over the years I've learned that
It requires a delicate balance and everything has its place. It's just a matter of knowing when and where to show off a little. That's what I love about Entwistle. He knew when to lay back and get in that pocket with Moon but could out play just about anyone else that came before or after him.
Yup. Entwistle didn't just provide rhythm. He infused the music with ambiance and a mood. Pete Townshend said it best in the interview I posted. John filled the void and only an orchestra could compensate for his absence. Entwistle was an innovator and a master. We lost him too soon.



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: spacedoubt

Have to agree with you about Stanley Clarke.......... once saw him play two guitars at once (one on a support) and it was no gimmick, he really played them.

I would add Michael Manring -- who might be considered the 'Michael Hedges of bass', and in fact played extensively on Michael Hedges's Breakfast in the Field album.

ETA: don't turn away from the opening gambit.......... watch the whole metamorphosis.





edit on 20/8/14 by argentus because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: argentus

Lot of Stanley Clarke votes. I saw him in 89. That was my first taste of that kind of bass player. Just amazing.
Here he is with Marcus Miller & Victor Wooten. SMV.




posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: ZetaRediculian I always thought that Stanley Clarke and Stanley Jordan should have done a set or two together. WOW! It would almost be too much sound.



posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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I can't believe I forgot Tony Levin of King Crimson fame. The first clip he starts playing at about a minute and a half in, its from an Ernie Ball Music Man clinic so there's a bit of talking at the beginning.



This next one is him jamming on a Chapman Stick



And this last one is him playing with Bill Bruford also from King Crimson




posted on Aug, 20 2014 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: ChaosComplex


Every video so far has been a 'solo' or 'jam' spot. That's the idea! Show what you got, put it all on the line, push your skills to the limit and melt some faces!

Just as I said: showing off. It isn't music. It's athletics.

Here is someone who combines athletics with genuine musical skill (though he's still a bit too much of a show-off):

His name, by the way, is Bruce Thomas.


edit on 20/8/14 by Astyanax because: of the butcher, the baker and the bassline maker.



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